Things Canadian.

#21
I had gathered you are of Native decent, so I figured he’d be right up your alley crying and trying to right every misdeed done by whitey to the indigenous peoples....
Not me. I didn't drink the Kool-Aid. We need a real Indian as chief (president) to fully address the injustices that have been done to my people over the years.
 
#24
I used to think that until I married one, a shâg is one thing , marriage wise, they aren’t that great......and ya, the morning bj wake up is an interesting Canadian trait among the ladies....
I'm married to a Canadian, I need to show her this post.
 
#25
Dunno if it's just me, but many "how do I do that" videos on Youtube seem to be Canadians. Say change a headlamp bulb in a car with fancy lights that are hard to get to the back of. Or change a part on a lawnmower or chainsaw. Not a criticism, just an observation that there's a vast band of instructional-video makers in Canada, it seems. I've used them many times!
 
#26
People here bad mouth Justin, but the reality is nobody really cares. Parliament doesn’t have Corbyn or Trump in it, so compared to other western countries, we’re in pretty good shape politically. If Trudeau wants to hug some Indians with hurt feelings or give some Syrian a minimum wage job, so be it. Same guy is also fighting with the dirty hippies in BC to get an oil pipeline to the coast and is actually spending money on defence, so he’s trying at least rather than whining like politicians in other countries governments. Besides, the dude made weed legal......
What is different in politics between Canada and the UK or US is that politics is less polarised here and focuses much less on ideology. There is generally more consensus on what ought to be done in terms of the big issues that people care about, so the politics is more directed towards who can best bring it about.

The political differences between the two largest parties today have more to do with image than substance. To a large extent that is a reaction to Harper. To take your pipelines example, Harper utterly failed to get anything accomplished throughout his time in power because he systematically alienated all the people whose cooperation he needed and then raged against them for not snapping to attention and obeying the glorious leader.

Trudeau wants the same ends, but listens sympathetically to the other side, makes soothing noises, and tries to get the general public on his side and isolates the irreconcilables by making an effort to appear fair and reasonable. He has said unequivocally though that he is going to get his way on this issue despite opposition from the BC government. As a result, public opinion is on his side even in BC.

On the night of the last election when it became apparent that Trudeau had taken his party from third place to victory, he quietly said "sunny ways my friends, sunny ways" as he stepped up to the podium. This was a reference to Sir Wilfred Laurier's solution to the political crisis known as the "Manitoba Schools Question", which was an attempt by the Manitoba government in the late 19th century to revoke minority rights (it was basically anti-Catholic legislation). Laurier solved the crisis through compromise. During the federal election campaign Laurier said:
If it were in my power, I would try the sunny way. I would approach this man Greenway with the sunny way of patriotism, asking him to be just and to be fair, asking him to be generous to the minority, in order that we may have peace among all the creeds and races which it has pleased God to bring upon this corner of our common country. Do you not believe that there is more to be gained by appealing to the heart and soul of men rather than to compel them to do a thing?
It has to be emphasised that Harper wasn't the whole of the Conservative Party, and indeed during the last days in the bunker several prominent Conservatives came out in public asking people to not vote Conservative in order to defeat Harper. They saw him as too divisive, as utterly devoid of moral principles, and as too focused on holding on to power by any means possible regardless of the cost to the political fabric of the country.

Trudeau sold himself to the public as an anti-Harper, as someone who would bring people together instead of setting them against one another. You won't understand his government without understanding what came before.

The turning point in the last election was probably when Harper analysed the political entrails of his focus groups and poll figures and decided that going full-on "THE MOOSE-LIMBS ARE GOING TO MURDER US IN OUR BEDS" mode would give him an edge against the NDP in a few marginal ridings in Quebec (where xenophobia often dwells just below the surface). Mulcair (NDP leader) took the bait and took a forceful stand right where Harper wanted his opponent to be standing. Trudeau stood aside and more or less said "this is not the sort of discussion we want to engage in, we don't agree with Harper but we're not going let him create a pointless polarising debate on this issue". And the rest is history.

Trudeau has already found that there are some people you just can't negotiate with (e.g. hardcore environmentalists). His strategy though is to isolate his opponents by appearing to be the reasonable one who considers all sides of the issue and acts fairly instead of demonising his opponents.

He has also found that the best laid plans can be throw awry by things you didn't anticipate, such as Boeing's attack on Bombardier which shifted the ground out from under the new fighter acquisition program. This had to be salvaged by some high speed course adjustments which are still being sorted out.

His major political advantage has been that he feels fairly secure in his position and so has appointed some fairly good ministers to actually run things for him, so the performance of the government doesn't actually depend on him. Sajjan in Defence and Freeland in Foreign Affairs come to mind as good examples. Harper by contrast suffered from chronic feelings of insecurity and would in most cases appoint as ministers people whom he felt posed no political threat to himself.

On the wider political front, the new Conservative leader (Scheer) is uninspiring to say the least and the new NDP leader (Singh) seems to be vying for the role of the invisible man. As a result Trudeau is seeing little in the way of effective political opposition in parliament. His main political problems are coming from provincial leaders who are squabbling between themselves.

The most immediate problems on Trudeau's agenda are the pipeline fight between BC and Alberta and the NAFTA renegotiations with the US. He is backing Alberta in the former and has the public in BC, if not the provincial government, on his side. With the latter, while Trump may threaten, the weight of political power at many levels in the US is not in favour of torpedoing the trade agreement despite the bluster emanating from the White House. Canada would be perfectly happy with the status quo and has been carefully working to minimise any substantive changes which affect Canada.

The darkest cloud on Trudeau's political horizon though is the election in Ontario. This post is getting too long as it is, so I won't at this time go into the bizarre twists and turns that have been taking place in the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party over the past few months. To make a long story short though, the current provincial government (Liberal) have been too long in power and the public have tired of them. The Conservatives however have after their traditional flurry of intrigue, backstabbing, and self-immolation, defied all reason and picked the most unsuitable leader (OK second most unsuitable, there was a worse one) available to them. If the Conservatives win, then going by their new leader's past performance in municipal politics it will be an absolute clown show in Queen's Park (provincial legislature). If the public reacts by voting in the NDP (the polls show them gaining rapidly), then Trudeau faces the problem that an NDP government that does well in Ontario might make the federal NDP look more appealing. A minority government threatens political paralysis. Ontario is by far the largest province in Canada, so what happens there matters in ways that wouldn't for the smaller ones.
 
#27
Dunno if it's just me, but many "how do I do that" videos on Youtube seem to be Canadians. Say change a headlamp bulb in a car with fancy lights that are hard to get to the back of. Or change a part on a lawnmower or chainsaw. Not a criticism, just an observation that there's a vast band of instructional-video makers in Canada, it seems. I've used them many times!
Donnyboy73 from the Muskoka’s in Ontario is in my opinion the best small engine guy on YouTube. Bit of an odd duck, but runs a professional business and channel, guy is thorough to say the least.
 
#28
What is different in politics between Canada and the UK or US is that politics is less polarised here and focuses much less on ideology. There is generally more consensus on what ought to be done in terms of the big issues that people care about, so the politics is more directed towards who can best bring it about.

The political differences between the two largest parties today have more to do with image than substance. To a large extent that is a reaction to Harper. To take your pipelines example, Harper utterly failed to get anything accomplished throughout his time in power because he systematically alienated all the people whose cooperation he needed and then raged against them for not snapping to attention and obeying the glorious leader.

Trudeau wants the same ends, but listens sympathetically to the other side, makes soothing noises, and tries to get the general public on his side and isolates the irreconcilables by making an effort to appear fair and reasonable. He has said unequivocally though that he is going to get his way on this issue despite opposition from the BC government. As a result, public opinion is on his side even in BC.

On the night of the last election when it became apparent that Trudeau had taken his party from third place to victory, he quietly said "sunny ways my friends, sunny ways" as he stepped up to the podium. This was a reference to Sir Wilfred Laurier's solution to the political crisis known as the "Manitoba Schools Question", which was an attempt by the Manitoba government in the late 19th century to revoke minority rights (it was basically anti-Catholic legislation). Laurier solved the crisis through compromise. During the federal election campaign Laurier said:


It has to be emphasised that Harper wasn't the whole of the Conservative Party, and indeed during the last days in the bunker several prominent Conservatives came out in public asking people to not vote Conservative in order to defeat Harper. They saw him as too divisive, as utterly devoid of moral principles, and as too focused on holding on to power by any means possible regardless of the cost to the political fabric of the country.

Trudeau sold himself to the public as an anti-Harper, as someone who would bring people together instead of setting them against one another. You won't understand his government without understanding what came before.

The turning point in the last election was probably when Harper analysed the political entrails of his focus groups and poll figures and decided that going full-on "THE MOOSE-LIMBS ARE GOING TO MURDER US IN OUR BEDS" mode would give him an edge against the NDP in a few marginal ridings in Quebec (where xenophobia often dwells just below the surface). Mulcair (NDP leader) took the bait and took a forceful stand right where Harper wanted his opponent to be standing. Trudeau stood aside and more or less said "this is not the sort of discussion we want to engage in, we don't agree with Harper but we're not going let him create a pointless polarising debate on this issue". And the rest is history.

Trudeau has already found that there are some people you just can't negotiate with (e.g. hardcore environmentalists). His strategy though is to isolate his opponents by appearing to be the reasonable one who considers all sides of the issue and acts fairly instead of demonising his opponents.

He has also found that the best laid plans can be throw awry by things you didn't anticipate, such as Boeing's attack on Bombardier which shifted the ground out from under the new fighter acquisition program. This had to be salvaged by some high speed course adjustments which are still being sorted out.

His major political advantage has been that he feels fairly secure in his position and so has appointed some fairly good ministers to actually run things for him, so the performance of the government doesn't actually depend on him. Sajjan in Defence and Freeland in Foreign Affairs come to mind as good examples. Harper by contrast suffered from chronic feelings of insecurity and would in most cases appoint as ministers people whom he felt posed no political threat to himself.

On the wider political front, the new Conservative leader (Scheer) is uninspiring to say the least and the new NDP leader (Singh) seems to be vying for the role of the invisible man. As a result Trudeau is seeing little in the way of effective political opposition in parliament. His main political problems are coming from provincial leaders who are squabbling between themselves.

The most immediate problems on Trudeau's agenda are the pipeline fight between BC and Alberta and the NAFTA renegotiations with the US. He is backing Alberta in the former and has the public in BC, if not the provincial government, on his side. With the latter, while Trump may threaten, the weight of political power at many levels in the US is not in favour of torpedoing the trade agreement despite the bluster emanating from the White House. Canada would be perfectly happy with the status quo and has been carefully working to minimise any substantive changes which affect Canada.

The darkest cloud on Trudeau's political horizon though is the election in Ontario. This post is getting too long as it is, so I won't at this time go into the bizarre twists and turns that have been taking place in the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party over the past few months. To make a long story short though, the current provincial government (Liberal) have been too long in power and the public have tired of them. The Conservatives however have after their traditional flurry of intrigue, backstabbing, and self-immolation, defied all reason and picked the most unsuitable leader (OK second most unsuitable, there was a worse one) available to them. If the Conservatives win, then going by their new leader's past performance in municipal politics it will be an absolute clown show in Queen's Park (provincial legislature). If the public reacts by voting in the NDP (the polls show them gaining rapidly), then Trudeau faces the problem that an NDP government that does well in Ontario might make the federal NDP look more appealing. A minority government threatens political paralysis. Ontario is by far the largest province in Canada, so what happens there matters in ways that wouldn't for the smaller ones.
Ontario is in for rough days ahead no matter who wins. Ford is an utterly useless self entitled moron who has nothing substantial to say, and good old Wynne has to figure out how to recoup all the cash the government has been hemorrhaging through Hydro cuts, free prescription drugs, etc. Andrea is, well, useless from the get go.
You aren’t by chance a Poly Sci prof at Western are you?
 
#29
(...) Ford is an utterly useless self entitled moron who has nothing substantial to say, (...)
Having nothing to say isn't just coincidence by the way. Conservative party strategy is to keep Ford as isolated from the voters as possible to keep him from self destructing and taking the party's chances down in flames with him.

As for Wynne, her own MPPs are asking her to stay away from their ridings.

Horwath is the only candidate whose appeal to voters increases the more they know about her. Of course she is facing a very low bar on that account considering whom she is being compared to.

The Conservative leadership convention had one, job, one job, and that was to pick between Christine Elliot and Caroline Mulroney, and they failed miserably at it.
 
#30
Having nothing to say isn't just coincidence by the way. Conservative party strategy is to keep Ford as isolated from the voters as possible to keep him from self destructing and taking the party's chances down in flames with him.

As for Wynne, her own MPPs are asking her to stay away from their ridings.

Horwath is the only candidate whose appeal to voters increases the more they know about her. Of course she is facing a very low bar on that account considering whom she is being compared to.

The Conservative leadership convention had one, job, one job, and that was to pick between Christine Elliot and Caroline Mulroney, and they failed miserably at it.
Not sure about you, but when I got an automated call from Ford he sounded like a boxer who’s been punched one to many times attempting to read cursive writing......
 
#31
A couple of elections ago I was called numerous times from an automated caller from one of the local political parties. I'm (supposedly because it doesn't work) on the do not call list. When I called to ask them to stop they said the DNC list didn't count for political parties and that they couldn't (or wouldn't) take me off the list. Luckily it only lasted that election.
 
#32
Not sure about you, but when I got an automated call from Ford he sounded like a boxer who’s been punched one to many times attempting to read cursive writing......
Be that as it may, he's still miles ahead of Premier Clamjouster.
 
#33
This is what Canadians want from their politicians, for them to get misty-eyed about the demise of an entertainment figure?
I got myself a nice 30-day stint in facebook jail for being somewhat less than fawning over Gord Downie's career and legacy of atrocious garage band music that has polluted the airwaves for nearly 30 years.

And no, I don't want a leader of Canada to be some dewy-eyed simpleton who weeps on cue. Too bad that backbone and a stiff upper lip have been taken over by that cretin's "emotion". Makes me sick.
 
#35
Apparently some of the busybodies in BC are upset that people are getting vanity plates for automobiles made which say naughty things in Punjabi.
Vanity plate declares 'I'm drunk' — in Punjabi | CBC News


Supposedly, PK-TUNN means something like "I'm drunk" in Punjabi, and "PK3PEG" means "after three drinks".

Some people are finding these plates offensive and are outraged that the government allowed the plates to be issued.
Saini, a mother of a six-year-old girl, says she feels the plates are offensive.

"My concern [is] what are we telling our kids? Whoever is looking at these plates is getting the message it's OK to get drunk and be on the streets," she said.

"These should be off the street."
The government has pointed out that they have one person reviewing vanity plate applications and it is not possible for him to know all languages and they have no plans to change their review procedures.

They are none the less revoking the ones already issued.

This apparently is not good enough for the permanently outraged.
Saini says that isn't good enough.

"I think they're lazy about it, that's how I see it."
 
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#36
And as if the Ontario election isn't enough of a train wreck, Rob Ford's widow is suing her brothers-in-law Doug and Randy for allegedly looting their late brother's estate of which they were trustees. Doug Ford is the current leader of the Conservative party in Ontario.
PC Leader Doug Ford faces lawsuit alleging millions withheld from late brother's family | CBC News
Rob Ford's widow has launched a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against brothers-in-law Doug and Randy Ford and their family businesses claiming she and her children were bilked out of millions of dollars.

In the suit filed Friday in Ontario Superior Court, Renata Ford says Doug and his brother Randy, who run the Ford family businesses, "conspired together" to deprive her and her children of shares in the family company Deco Toronto and the proceeds of a life insurance policy. The brothers are trustees for their late brother's estate.
This comes just three days before the election, and the Conservatives are neck and neck with the NDP.

Since this involves the Fords, I'm not going to even attempt to guess who is right or wrong in this one.

Considering the number and scope of scandals more directly associated with the election campaign already surrounding Ford and his team, I woudn't care to bet that this new one will hurt his chances any more than the others already have.

I am going to sit back and just marvel at it all though.
 
#38
Saini says that isn't good enough.

"I think they're lazy about it, that's how I see it."
Says the woman with nothing better to do than monitor other people's licence plates for foreign homonyms.
 

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