Things Canadian.

I am sorry (how very Canadian, eh? growing up a bit next to Canada thought me that), but I have to post one of my favorite clips about the Canucks again. It's been a while. This popped up in my head again.

 
Had a band. The new CO ordered all civilian volunteers to turn in their kit, so the band was reduced to something like two pipers and two cadets.
Shïte deal considering the majority of reg force P&D’s are volunteer, some CO’s never see the big picture of the benefits of civvy augmented bands.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Maybe. I dunno. I sorta liked it at the time. Was a very long time ago. One of the very few Canuck shows I ever watched. Apart from Trailer Park Boys.
Only one funny Canadian prog, the Red Green show
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
This is a cracking tradition at the Ottawa Citizen, We Are the Dead, at 11am a name is spat out of a computer, the journalists then have till the end of that days working shift to find out everything they can about them, the project is now in it's 8th year. Here's a thread that details the search, the link at the bottom is the finished profile


We Are The Dead: George Jameson enlisted early in WW1, died at Ypres
 
This is a cracking tradition at the Ottawa Citizen, We Are the Dead, at 11am a name is spat out of a computer, the journalists then have till the end of that days working shift to find out everything they can about them, the project is now in it's 8th year. Here's a thread that details the search, the link at the bottom is the finished profile


We Are The Dead: George Jameson enlisted early in WW1, died at Ypres
Interesting that he was one of the first Pat’s as the majority of the original battalion were, well ex-pats.....
 
The NDP continues to slide in the polls, or as the sub-heading puts it, the "Orange Wave is at a low ebb". NDP hits new polling low in Quebec with Outremont byelection test looming | CBC News
Three surveys conducted over the last few weeks suggest that the NDP is in trouble in Quebec, where the party won 16 seats in the 2015 federal election. The Quebec contingent makes up the largest provincial grouping in the federal NDP caucus.
In recent elections the NDP had been able to take advantage of the collapse of support for separatists in Quebec to offer themselves as an alternative vaguely socialist-themed party without the separatist baggage. They scooped up so many seats that Quebec became the core region of their support.

During the last election the NDP ran neck-and-neck with the other parties and had a serious chance of winning before the Liberals pulled ahead of the other parties late in the campaign.

After the election the party activists took the loss badly and blamed it on the leader, Tom Mulcair, and dumped him. This was in my opinion a serious mistake, as he had more credibility than the party in general and they would be hard pressed to find someone else as good.

Their new leader, Jagmeet Singh, has done his best to impersonate the Invisible Man. He appeals to party activists, but not to the public at large. This is a bit of a problem if the goal is to be elected to power rather than to act as a social club.

The collapse of NDP support in Quebec has been catastrophic, down to between 8 and 11 percent. That could put them as low as fourth place.
Three surveys conducted over the last few weeks suggest that the NDP is in trouble in Quebec, where the party won 16 seats in the 2015 federal election. The Quebec contingent makes up the largest provincial grouping in the federal NDP caucus.

The most recent four-week rolling poll from Nanos Research pegged NDP support in Quebec at just under 11 per cent. In a poll published last week, Mainstreet Research put it at nine per cent, while the Léger/Journal de Montréal survey published on Monday gave the New Democrats just eight per cent support in Quebec, ranking it in a distant fourth place.
In terms of personal popularity for who would be the best PM, Singh is at 6% in Quebec, behind Trudeau (Liberal) at 44%, Scheer (Conservative) at 18%, and Bernier (People's Party) at 10%. Bernier's rating is worth noting, as the People's Party are only a few months old. See previous posts in this thread for more information on them.
Nanos finds that just six per cent of Quebecers choose the former Ontario MPP as the best person to be prime minister, well behind the current occupant of the office, Justin Trudeau (44 per cent), Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer (18 per cent) and People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier (10 per cent).
Singh just barely edges out the new Bloc Québécois leader, Yves-François Blanchet (who isn't running for the job of prime minister), and Elizabeth May of the Greens.
The CBC are projecting that the NDP will likely win no seats in Quebec at the next election, and have a chance at only one.
Regardless of how its support is distributed, the NDP would struggle to hold any seat in the province if its support dips into single digits. The CBC Poll Tracker currently projects the party is favoured to win no seats in Quebec and is in contention in only one: Alexandre Boulerice's riding of Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie on the island of Montreal.
The Liberals are projected to win all but one of the NDP's seats in Quebec.
If these trends hold, the NDP's rivals will be circling. The Poll Tracker suggests the Liberals are favoured to win all but one of the NDP's 16 seats in the province, but the Bloc is in contention in as many as six of them (primarily in and around Montreal) and the Conservatives in three (mostly in central Quebec).
Prior to becoming federal NDP leader, Jagmeet Singh was an NDP MPP in Ontario provincial politics, where he was almost unknown outside of party circles. He apparently appeals to party activists, but has made no impression on the public at large. He doesn't currently hold a seat in Ottawa. He is running in a by-election in Vancouver in what should be a safe seat for the NDP. However, it is by no means certain that he will win there. If he loses in that riding, the NDP will be going into a general election this autumn in an even more weakened position.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
A dim question for the Canucks...

'True North ...Proud & Free '

Is it part of the Canadian National Anthem ?
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Thanks...son is in Toronto.
 
A dim question for the Canucks...

'True North ...Proud & Free '

Is it part of the Canadian National Anthem ?
Here's information about the nation anthem.
Anthems of Canada - Canada.ca

Here's the English version.

O Canada!
Our home and native land!
True patriot love in all of us command.

With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
The True North strong and free!

From far and wide,
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

God keep our land glorious and free!
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

The French version can be found at the above link. The lyrics of the French version are quite a bit different from the English version. The French version was the original, the English lyrics came much later.

The French lyrics were written in 1880 by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier for the National Congress of French Canadians and remain unchanged to today. Routhier was a Quebec judge who was also a poet. Routhier was made a knight of the The Most Honourable Order of the Bath in 1911.

The music was written in 1880 by Calixa Lavallée, also for the National Congress of French Canadians, to go with the lyrics. Lavallée was a successful composer from Quebec in that era, and travelled about various parts of the world pursuing a musical career.

This original version was performed in Quebec in 1880, but remained obscure for some years thereafter. It was first heard in English Canada in 1901, when it was sung by schoolchildren for the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall (later King George V and Queen Mary) when they toured Canada.

The English version has undergone multiple revisions, with at least three prior completely different versions. The current lyrics were written in 1908 (with a minor change in 2018 ) by Robert Stanley Weir, another judge and part time poet.

However, for most of its history its use as a national anthem was unofficial, and only became the official anthem in 1980.
 

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