Theresa May about to Resign?

May will lose the vote tonight. By about 130 votes at least.
A General Election is looking pretty certain and fairly soon. May will lead the Tories into that election because there won't be enough time for a leadership contest.
Whether she'll stay much longer after that will obviously depend on the GE result but my prediction is that the Tories will win but not by enough to keep her job safe.
GE fairly soon followed by a leadership contest. Then the mongs will start the usual wittering about how they didn't vote for (insert name of favourite candidate here) so we should have another GE.
(So how's this fixed term parliamentary act working out so far, then?)
 
Christ, is this reality or an Ealing comedy script rejected as too far-fetched?
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
I can't remember if I've mentioned this before. My wife and I have three bottles of Veuve Clicquot Brut in the fridge. Each is marked for a special occasion. One is for the day the UK officially leaves the EU, one is for the day Teresa May leaves office and one for the day Angela Merkel steps down. By the looks of things, we could be drinking two of them this month.
Is Angela going so soon?
 
Conservative Home is an interesting browse. To an outside non-CP member, it would appear that there are such schisms in basic belief sets between groups that the Conservative Party really needs to split into two or three new entities. Funnily enough, such a split could only work in the environment of, say, a technocratic political regime (no names, no pack drill) - as the grassroots membership appear to be in an entirely different block to the CPHQ and the politicians.
Constituency and Parliamentary Parties are not alike. I know many local Conservatives in my town, and a few of them are dear friends, but none of them are as vicious, self serving and arrogant as those around May today. If I suggested her and her entire cabinet all be hog tied and thrown in the river, I think few would strongly object, as they can clearly feel the damage they are doing to the Tory brand.

Conservative Home has cheered me up. Tory party in utter disarray over a Tory created crisis. I wonder who this bright spark, Shaun_Bennett81 (81 probably his age) wrote:

Labour have already rejected the new deal. The other opposition parties will inevitably follow suit.

But that was inevitable. Labour only do whatever is politically convenient for THEM. They want to cause maximum instability to force a general election. (That's what the opposition is for. Conservatives never do anything to suit themselves, do they? Idiot.)
Whilst the other opposition parties just want a 2nd referendum to overturn Brexit entirely. (It's that pesky opposition thing, again! How dare they!?)

Fortunately the opposition parties are irrelevant. What matters is what the DUP and Tory MPs think about it. If thry are on side, then it will pass. (Irrelevant? Really? why bother with Parliament at all then?)

You, Shaun are Mark Francois MP and gammon-faced hysterical tosspot and I claim my £5...
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
Constituency and Parliamentary Parties are not alike. I know many local Conservatives in my town, and a few of them are dear friends, but none of them are as vicious, self serving and arrogant as those around May today. If I suggested her and her entire cabinet all be hog tied and thrown in the river, I think few would strongly object, as they can clearly feel the damage they are doing to the Tory brand.

Conservative Home has cheered me up. Tory party in utter disarray over a Tory created crisis. I wonder who this bright spark, Shaun_Bennett81 (81 probably his age) wrote:

Labour have already rejected the new deal. The other opposition parties will inevitably follow suit.

But that was inevitable. Labour only do whatever is politically convenient for THEM. They want to cause maximum instability to force a general election. (That's what the opposition is for. Conservatives never do anything to suit themselves, do they? Idiot.)
Whilst the other opposition parties just want a 2nd referendum to overturn Brexit entirely. (It's that pesky opposition thing, again! How dare they!?)

Fortunately the opposition parties are irrelevant. What matters is what the DUP and Tory MPs think about it. If thry are on side, then it will pass. (Irrelevant? Really? why bother with Parliament at all then?)

You, Shaun are Mark Francois MP and gammon-faced hysterical tosspot and I claim my £5...
And thus you prove again that even Bugsy has a better grasp of political realities than you...

The purpose of the loyal opposition is to hold the government of the day to account publicly, to be critical of proposed legislation and to fight election campaigns offering an alternative when elections are called. This is to ensure that constituents are represented rather than just the important voters in the key marginals being bribed. If the government is proposing legislation for the good of the country, or for valid moral or humanitarian reasons, I would argue it is the duty of the opposition for support the government. Examples being increased military spending in the run up to the 1939 unpleasantness or the Syria intervention that the majority of Labour backed (while their top leadership didn't).

It is emphatically NOT the role of the opposition to try and bring down the government every week to force a general election in the hopes of getting power. Government and opposition isn't about power. It's about serving the nation and paying party politics over the issues before parliament right now would be cynical and manipulative if it wasn't so pathetically obvious.
 
Constituency and Parliamentary Parties are not alike. I know many local Conservatives in my town, and a few of them are dear friends, but none of them are as vicious, self serving and arrogant as those around May today. If I suggested her and her entire cabinet all be hog tied and thrown in the river, I think few would strongly object, as they can clearly feel the damage they are doing to the Tory brand.

Conservative Home has cheered me up. Tory party in utter disarray over a Tory created crisis. I wonder who this bright spark, Shaun_Bennett81 (81 probably his age) wrote:

Labour have already rejected the new deal. The other opposition parties will inevitably follow suit.

But that was inevitable. Labour only do whatever is politically convenient for THEM. They want to cause maximum instability to force a general election. (That's what the opposition is for. Conservatives never do anything to suit themselves, do they? Idiot.)
Whilst the other opposition parties just want a 2nd referendum to overturn Brexit entirely. (It's that pesky opposition thing, again! How dare they!?)

Fortunately the opposition parties are irrelevant. What matters is what the DUP and Tory MPs think about it. If thry are on side, then it will pass. (Irrelevant? Really? why bother with Parliament at all then?)

You, Shaun are Mark Francois MP and gammon-faced hysterical tosspot and I claim my £5...
Labour would oppose a bill granting all illegal immigrants leave to stay & a doubling of expenditure on the NHS if it was introduced by a Conservative government.
That's the kind of thing you leftist dolts think is engendered by being in opposition.
 
And thus you prove again that even Bugsy has a better grasp of political realities than you...

The purpose of the loyal opposition is to hold the government of the day to account publicly, to be critical of proposed legislation and to fight election campaigns offering an alternative when elections are called. This is to ensure that constituents are represented rather than just the important voters in the key marginals being bribed. If the government is proposing legislation for the good of the country, or for valid moral or humanitarian reasons, I would argue it is the duty of the opposition for support the government. Examples being increased military spending in the run up to the 1939 unpleasantness or the Syria intervention that the majority of Labour backed (while their top leadership didn't).

It is emphatically NOT the role of the opposition to try and bring down the government every week to force a general election in the hopes of getting power. Government and opposition isn't about power. It's about serving the nation and paying party politics over the issues before parliament right now would be cynical and manipulative if it wasn't so pathetically obvious.
You have a ridiculously rose-tinted view of the Tories, parliament and brexit, don't you?
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
You have a ridiculously rose-tinted view of the Tories, parliament and brexit, don't you?
No. I have a remarkably cynical view as to how far parliament has fallen from the ideal. And you haven't the wit or vision to see that it is the current incarnation of the labour party with its focus on Marxism and identity politics that is acting as the sea-anchor that is dragging things down.
 
Disastrous' £11.4bn NHS IT programme to be abandoned

A multi-billion pound IT project started by Labour to link all parts of the NHS is to be abandoned...The integrated electronic care records system is a central part of Labour’s £11bn National Programme for IT in the NHS, which was set up in 2002 and faced repeated criticism since then over its cost and technical problems, most recently from the National Audit Office.

21 Sep 2011
'Disastrous' £11.4bn NHS IT programme to be abandoned


How Labour broke the NHS – and why Labour must fix it

Some of us found this quite annoying too - and you compare £53 million on a garden bridge to this utter travesty.
I think that you are the only person who has compared the two, I certainly haven’t.
 
No. I have a remarkably cynical view as to how far parliament has fallen from the ideal. And you haven't the wit or vision to see that it is the current incarnation of the labour party with its focus on Marxism and identity politics that is acting as the sea-anchor that is dragging things down.
You are blaming the Labour Party for the failure of the Tory government to govern or deliver Brexit? Do you seriously expect Labour to help the Tories out of this farcical mess, all of their own creation?

Of course you do. You believe the Tories to be the natural party of government in a one party state, and Labour to do the decent thing and support them, but never challenge the status quo, don't you? A nice little supine cap doffing party of the 'umble workin man' who will never hold the Tories to account, or change anything at all.

Those days are over. And sooner the Tories die out, the better for this entire country.
 
May will lose the vote tonight. By about 130 votes at least.
A General Election is looking pretty certain and fairly soon. May will lead the Tories into that election because there won't be enough time for a leadership contest.
Whether she'll stay much longer after that will obviously depend on the GE result but my prediction is that the Tories will win but not by enough to keep her job safe.
GE fairly soon followed by a leadership contest. Then the mongs will start the usual wittering about how they didn't vote for (insert name of favourite candidate here) so we should have another GE.
(So how's this fixed term parliamentary act working out so far, then?)
Regardless of how poorly she has handled the negotiations it was always going to be a poison chalice. Given how tired she looks and sounds I bet she cannot wait to step down.
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
You are blaming the Labour Party for the failure of the Tory government to govern or deliver Brexit? Do you seriously expect Labour to help the Tories out of this farcical mess, all of their own creation?

Of course you do. You believe the Tories to be the natural party of government in a one party state, and Labour to do the decent thing and support them, but never challenge the status quo, don't you? A nice little supine cap doffing party of the 'umble workin man' who will never hold the Tories to account, or change anything at all.

Those days are over. And sooner the Tories die out, the better for this entire country.
My what an emotive stream of barely sentient consciousness...

No, I blame May and her chief advisor Ollie Robins on the UK side and the venal EU mandarins on the other for the utter shambles of a negotiation. Their vision of Brexit wasn't a return of national sovereignty and liberty but rather vassalage. In particular the fallout from the chequers meetings (when it came out that the Brexit ministry was being excluded from negotiation duties because May and the EU viewed it as the means of preparing domestic legislation) proved to me that May was not fit to occupy No. 10.

However at every single turn Corbyn, McDonnell and Abbott have tried to make every single development in the negotiation process more difficult, not out of a sense of duty to the nation but to play party politics. You do NOT demand every red-libe to be publicly scrutinised and debated prior to the meeting with the other side. You give away your entire strategy...

As I have said on these fora more than once, politics is the art and the science of compromise. But it is an art and science Mr. Corbyn has never learned because he has never had to compromise to achieve anything. If he ever gets his feet under the table at no. 10 he would rather achieve nothing and watch the country burn down than compromise his principles. And as those principles are primarily opposition to everything this nation stands for and supporting Dodgy terrorists of every sort as long as they are sticking it to the west, I find that prospect terrifying.
 
As I have said on these fora more than once, politics is the art and the science of compromise. But it is an art and science Mr. Corbyn has never learned because he has never had to compromise to achieve anything. If he ever gets his feet under the table at no. 10 he would rather achieve nothing and watch the country burn down than compromise his principles. And as those principles are primarily opposition to everything this nation stands for and supporting Dodgy terrorists of every sort as long as they are sticking it to the west, I find that prospect terrifying.
I regret I can only give a like for that!
 
Regardless of how poorly she has handled the negotiations it was always going to be a poison chalice. Given how tired she looks and sounds I bet she cannot wait to step down.
I'll not disagree. I think that, she has now got into such a mess and left it all so very late, that she simply cannot step down at the moment.

We have the "meaningful vote" on no deal today, followed by one on an extension tomorrow. I suspect that, despite my personal feelings, that Parliament will hamstring her on leaving without a vote, and vote for an extension. If she does trot back to Europe, cap in hand, for an extension, and be granted one (and the EU will make us pay through the nose for it), she will step down in order for someone else to do the negotiations.

In my opinion, she has failed to deliver (unless we do go without a deal, which we will find out about today). She has failed in the negotiations and failed at uniting her party, let alone the house.

To be honest, I really believe that she has reduced the country to a laughing stock in the EU. They have played her like a five year old looking for some cookies!
 

Oxygen_Thief

On ROPS
On ROPs
Regardless of how poorly she has handled the negotiations it was always going to be a poison chalice. Given how tired she looks and sounds I bet she cannot wait to step down.
I’ll buck the trend.

I don’t see it, even now, as a poison chalice.

It was the opportunity of a lifetime for a PM to go down in the history books alongside the greats.

It was always going to be incredibly difficult and challenging, of course. But with a clear vision and some backbone it could have been delivered to both parties satisfaction.

We’re here now because an avid Remainer was in charge of a Remain heavy Parliament who had every intention of not delivering, but even worse of sabotaging the UKs position.

The concept of Brexit is still a good one, the delivery has been a deliberate shambles.
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
I’ll buck the trend.

I don’t see it, even now, as a poison chalice.

It was the opportunity of a lifetime for a PM to go down in the history books alongside the greats.

It was always going to be incredibly difficult and challenging, of course. But with a clear vision and some backbone it could have been delivered to both parties satisfaction.

We’re here now because an avid Remainer was in charge of a Remain heavy Parliament who had every intention of not delivering, but even worse of sabotaging the UKs position.

The concept of Brexit is still a good one, the delivery has been a deliberate shambles.
That deserves a standing ovation.
 
I’ll buck the trend.

I don’t see it, even now, as a poison chalice.

It was the opportunity of a lifetime for a PM to go down in the history books alongside the greats.

It was always going to be incredibly difficult and challenging, of course. But with a clear vision and some backbone it could have been delivered to both parties satisfaction.

We’re here now because an avid Remainer was in charge of a Remain heavy Parliament who had every intention of not delivering, but even worse of sabotaging the UKs position.

The concept of Brexit is still a good one, the delivery has been a deliberate shambles.
At heart I am a leaver. I voted remain, through gritted teeth, as no one on the leave side could convince me that there was a plan for what would happen next (Bear in mind that I used to work for one of the most prominent Brexiter MPs and even he hasn't managed to convince me of that). Sadly I have been proven right. I loathe the creeping federalisation of an unaccountable EU but I just can't see anything that is going to mitigate the severe economic damage that the country is going to suffer if we leave without a deal.

Watching Japanese TV last night there was report on what is happening in the UK and what we can expect from a no-deal and even the news anchors who, according to my wife were being super-factual about the whole thing, were predicting carnage.

My sensible head says that, whatever happens, it will be neither as good as the leavers suggest nor as bad as the remainers want us to think. I am pretty sure, though, that the UK is going to be very uncomfortable for some time to come.
 
Johnson today, sporting another haircut..........one more shot at the leadership.
Good man.
I think you mis-spelt good, it's actually Arrogant self-serving prick
 

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