There are decent people out there.

#1
A long time ago I was dropping my car of at the garage for its MOT. As I walked into work I witnessed someone hit a car with their and drive away. Being the pillar of society that I am, I made a note of the number plate and went to ensure that the driver of the car involved in the hit and run was ok.

I gave him my details (and obviously the number plate) and didn't expect much more. A witness statement to the police who were very friendly and that was the end of the matter. Or so I thought.

This morning, the very nice man pulled up out side my house (in his brand new car!!) and dropped of a bottle of wine and a box of chocolates. Although i'm not at all materialistic and don't 'do' Christmas I was genuinely touched at his kindness. This has rekindled my believe in man kind, that we're not all completely self centred and that there is hope for society.
 
#8
i remember a young lady doing something similar at a VCP in east tyrone in about 91. careful when you open that tin of quality street mate ;)
 
#9
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
i remember a young lady doing something similar at a VCP in east tyrone in about 91. careful when you open that tin of quality street mate ;)
Classic. Did it leave a majic moment when it crumped
 
#10
He didn't give you anything else apart from the bottle and the chocolates did he? ;-)
 
#11
B'astard- he gets a new car and all you get is a bottle of plonk and some chocolates?

Look in the bottom of the chocolate box.
I think you will find a card that reads
"Happy Xmas Sucker."
 
#12
I remember being on Sanger duty on Christmas eve 1972 on my first Op BANNER tour at the Portacabined SF base at Musgrave Park Hospital.

It was blinding snow, there were two of us in the Sanger and we could not see much more than a few few out of the firing port. Out of the snow came the sound of children singing carols and about 40 of them came into vision, all wrapped up in scarves and gloves, carrying Christmas Lanterns.

They stood in front of the Sanger singing carols to us. Their teacher handed us a large egg box full of goodies such as chocolate, cigarettes cans of beer etc to share out among the soldiers, goods that had been donated by the parents for us at Christmas. Parents who themselves did not not have much.

I was completely choked by that gesture which certainly taught me that there are decent people about, even if, at times, they seem to be in a minority.

We saw other decent people at tea stops, on that and on many subsequent tours. Little old ladies that gave us a mugs of tea and biscuits despite being intimidated by local thugs. Ordinary people, even in hard Republican areas who would surrepticiously pass a bottle of whisky or a packet of cigarettes out of a window to a foot patrol in freezing weather.

The kindness of ordinary people in that place is something that stays in the memory and tends to cloud out the lesser pleasant ones and I will take them the grave with me.

It is the little single acts of kindness on the part of ordinary people that stay with you.
 
#13
I was stagging on Redford Bks front gate, Xmas 88, and a carful of young ladies stops and they all jump out and give me a kiss and box of chocolates. The guard commander rightfully bollocked me for not getting them in the guardroom for some proper seasons greetings from the lads.
 
#14
Iolis,
those folk weren't 'decent people' they were prossies thanking you for turning up to give the republicans a good kicking.
 
#15
SLRboy said:
Iolis,
those folk weren't 'decent people' they were prossies thanking you for turning up to give the republicans a good kicking.
Or Republican touts, offering a "nice hot cup of tea" but with something of themselves in it?
 
#16
Cuddles,
Being its Ireland your interpretation is probably the more accurate.
 
#18
Bad_Crow said:
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
i remember a young lady doing something similar at a VCP in east tyrone in about 91. careful when you open that tin of quality street mate ;)
Classic. Did it leave a majic moment when it crumped
failed to go off luckily. but it gave him an interesting new emotion when he took it out of his locker and opened it on christmas day, to find a sizeable quantity of semtex below the top layer.
 
#19
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
failed to go off luckily. but it gave him an interesting new emotion when he took it out of his locker and opened it on christmas day, to find a sizeable quantity of semtex below the top layer.
I don't believe that TBH. What soldier would keep a box of chocolates without opening them within the first hour of receiving!

Admit it. You're making it up. :wink:
 
#20
they drank the bottle of whisky straight away, forgot about the chocs till xmas day. i still believe the reason it failed to go off is it was during the IRA's annual 3 day xmas ceasefire.

which goes to prove that bombs have souls, unlike the ******* who made it :)
 

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