Ther German Navy.

#1
The German minesweeper FSG Groemitz.

What do you expect when you name you ship after a plastacine dog.
 

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#8
As soon as the RN gets a reputation for anything every one tries to copy.
Very good.

I see they've hoisted the NUC (Not Under Command) signal, the appropriate ' two balls up'. Not really necessary as there are other clues for passing ships.

No sign of any chavs and pikeys waiting to loot stuff. Why ever not?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#10
Unrelated but on-topic wrt the title of the thread. It's a long one but worth it: bear with me.

1985 and Army are about to tonk Crabs in the annual Inter-service Regatta off Kiel. My former 15/19H Unit Paymaster phones my unit and tells me,

"Corporal Alien, you have been chosen from a shortlist of one to represent Army against Crabs. Our crew will consist of the CO and RSM of my new unit."

Cometh the day and the race in question takes us out of Kiel, west of the bouyed channel and round in a big square leaving all the course markers to starboard. One particular course marker is actually one of the channel markers indicating the channel leading into Kiel, which will start our return to BKYC. This will be left to starboard like all the others.

We are quite well placed among the Army crews, and actually ahead of the skipper's worst enemy, his buddy the former Unit Paymaster of 3RTR whose name escapes me. Never mind the Crabs, they are all a long way back. We are closing rapidly on this marker.

As navigator, in the murky weather I notice a small object in the water, moving at speed, apparently too quickly for the size of the vessel. (At this point I could be quoting from The Cruel Sea.) Funnily enough, as in The Cruel Sea, this small object turns out to be a U-Boat, on the surface but low in the water and motoring.

I keep taking bearings to the U-Boat but it doesn't take instrumentation to recognise that the bearing isn't changing. There are two explanations:

1. We are on the same course and speed;
2. We are on a collision course.

Clearly we are on a collision course. I know that he will have left some leeway between himself and the buoy and I know we'll be turning sharply when we get there. It helps that there are yachts ahead and astern and any astute U-Boat commander ought to have done his sums and worked out where we shall be turning. So we just plough on heading for the buoy.

The closer we get to the buoy with the bearing to the U-Boat unchanged, the more heads pop up on top of the conning tower. They certainly look to be getting agitated. After all, our bearing to them hasn't changed either and they ought to know what I know that means.

We reach the buoy only about ten meters from the U-Boat's midships and turn hard - as we would anyway - we were racing after all. There was a collective look of relief on all the faces on the conning tower.

Now our flotilla out of the British Kiel Yacht Club was flying Red Ensigns and technically we were the junior naval craft on the water. This was a U-Boat - Germany's nearest thing to a capital ship.

So I quite calmly dropped the ensign in salute and stood to attention for them.

THAT surprised them. Amused, I watched the scurry of hands on the tower trying to get to their ensign to return the salute. They were still scurrying as the U-Boat shot over the horizon.

Well it made me laugh.
 
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#12
I had the helm on "Lillibulero" (the REME yacht) once upon a time and our trusty Nav said "See that thing on the horizon? That's the Kiel lighthouse. Steer for it". So I did, only to get the feeling that it seemed to be moving... I was a landlubber young Gunner doing as he was told, when it became apparent that it was not a feckin' big black and white stripey lighthouse on a feckin' big rock, but a feckin' big spinnaker on a feckin' big German Yacht! Ahaaaar!
 
#15
I just found it in the interesting pics part on CNN.com.

I am sure there is a story though
 
#16
Here's what happened and when:

http://www.marine.de/01DB070000000001/CurrentBaseLink/W26YNAU8913INFODE

Here's a swift translation for those not so familiar with the German language:

"Minesweeper GRÖMITZ ran aground
During the early hours of Wednesday, 21 February 2007, the minesweeper GRÖMITZ ran aground in Norway.

The ship is at the moment engaged in NATO’s Standing Mine Counter Measures Group (SNMCMG 1). During the night there was very heavy snowfall and thus greatly reduced visibility. The 42-man crew of the GRÖMITZ remained uninjured during the incident.

Preliminary findings indicate that there were no hull breaches and no danger to the environment. At the moment, preparations are being made to float the ship off with the next high tide. The GRÖMITZ is a minesweeper of the FRANKENTHAL-class and is part of the 5th Minesweeping Squadron stationed in Kiel. Since the beginning of 2007, the ship has been part of NATO’s Mine Counter Measures Group 1 (SNMCMG 1), commanded by the Belgian Serge Ots."

MsG
 
#17
AlienFTM said:
So I quite calmly dropped the ensign in salute and stood to attention for them.

THAT surprised them. Amused, I watched the scurry of hands on the tower trying to get to their ensign to return the salute. They were still scurrying as the U-Boat shot over the horizon.

Well it made me laugh.
Similar story coming out of Kiel heading for Denmark on the RE yacht St Christopher a German boat (might have been a mine sweeper) is nearly level with us and the Skipper tells us to put up the White Ensign as technically it's a military vessel cue as ship gets level with us all German crew who were on deck stood to attention as we passed quick wave and dropped the flag and away we went :headbang:
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#18
Sweeping the beach for mines I see!
 
#19
And here’s a Happy Harry ending to the story:

http://www.marine.de/01DB070000000001/CurrentBaseLink/W26YNAU8913INFODE

And, once again, a nifty translation for those too lazy to drag out their rusty German:

Minesweeper GRÖMITZ refloated

The minesweeper GRÖMITZ, which ran aground on Wednesday, 21 February 2007, has been refloated.
A Norwegian salvage tug towed the minesweeper GRÖMITZ to deeper water during the course of the afternoon. The ship is now heading for the Norwegian naval harbour Hakonsvaern under its own power. Once there, the keel of the boat will be inspected more closely.
Heavy snowstorms and thus gravely limited visibility were the prevalent conditions in the early hours of 21 February as the ship ran aground. The 42-man crew of the GRÖMITZ remained uninjured during the incident.
The GRÖMITZ is a minesweeper of the FRANKENTHAL-class and is part of the 5the Minesweeping Squadron stationed in Kiel. Since the beginning of 2007, the ship has been part of NATO’s Mine Counter Measures Group 1 (SNMCMG 1), commanded by the Belgian Serge Ots.
 
#20
Bugsy said:
.......the ship has been part of NATO’s Mine Counter Measures Group 1 (SNMCMG 1), commanded by the Belgian Serge Ots.

Oh no. Tintin at the helm !

With Hercule Poirot as navigator
 

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