Theft of weapons from Small Arms School Corp Museum

#42
I wonder if these old boys are thinking about staging a coup when the balloon goes up over Brexit?



Back in the day, when even a TV prop department knew how to put a sling on a rifle correctly!



p.s. was Leonard Rossiter a spook at one time? In 2001: A Space Odyssey he appears to be speaking un-dubbed fluent Russian.
 
#43
p.s. was Leonard Rossiter a spook at one time? In 2001: A Space Odyssey he appears to be speaking un-dubbed fluent Russian.
National Service Int Corps, apparently. Possibly a linguist?
 
#44
The person with the guns at home was an employee of the museum. As the guns are traceable to the museum and he had no apparent legitimate reason for them to be at his home (or sold on), his legal defence is going to have to be innovative indeed to get a not guilty plea.

Wordsmith
I'll have a go ...

Well , M'lud , my client took the weapons in question home to clean them IN HIS OWN TIME , a noble act , you will agree ? Whilst cleaning the weapons , a friend came round and gave my client some money he was owed , which he then took upstairs for safekeeping . On his return downstairs , he found the weapons gone . Being too embarrassed , and afraid of the shame and losing his job , he failed to report the theft to the proper authorities .
 
#45
It never fails to amaze me, the ease with which military weapons and ammunition are lost or stolen.
 
#46
My old man worked in defence contracting. They never made less than 30% profit on those jobs.
That's hearsay - any actual evidence? I'm talking about the last three years or so?
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
#48
It never fails to amaze me, the ease with which military weapons and ammunition are lost or stolen.
As an ex policeman one of them obviously knew how to work the system -







for a while. :oops:
 
#49
National Service Int Corps, apparently. Possibly a linguist?

From Wiki - He was educated at the Liverpool Collegiate School (1939–46).[4] His ambition was to go to university to read modern languages and become a teacher. However, his father, who served as a voluntary ambulanceman during the Second World War, was killed in an air raid in 1941 and Rossiter had to support his mother. He therefore could not take up the place he had been offered at Liverpool University.[5] Instead he did his National Service as a sergeant, initially in the Intelligence Corps, then in the Army Education Corps,.


So you're probably correct. National Service and a sergeant so he must have had something.
 
#50
It never fails to amaze me, the ease with which military weapons and ammunition are lost or stolen as a result of inside jobs.
Fixed that for you.
 
#51
My question if they had carried on doing this there would have been no exhibits left in the museum

Archie
I wonder if they ever worked at the IWM in London. It may answer a few questions.

Pleading not guilty when stolen firearms were found at your home can only be described as "highly optimistic".

Wordsmith
You never know, some people brass it out quite effectively.
wimages.jpg
 
#52
He's obviously been employing Baldrick as a legal adviser. According to the prosecution:


Pleading not guilty when stolen firearms were found at your home can only be described as "highly optimistic".

Wordsmith
If they were famous they could suddenly develop ms / diabetes / alzheimer's etc and then claim they had no knowledge of them and plant enough doubt to get off scot free
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#53
If they were famous they could suddenly develop ms / diabetes / alzheimer's etc and then claim they had no knowledge of them and plant enough doubt to get off scot free
Are you referring to Ernest Saunders, of Guinness fame, who made of of the few recorded recoveries from Alzheimer's and was able to resume his career as a business consultant despite getting early release from prison after apparently developing dementia.

Ernest Saunders - Wikipedia
On 16 May 1991, the sentence was reduced to two and a half years. Lord Justice Neill said that he was satisfied that Saunders was suffering from pre-senile dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease, which is incurable. The decision was based on evidence from Dr Patrick Gallwey, a forensic pathologist, that Saunders was unable to recite three numbers backwards, was unable to use a door and his assertion that Gerald Ford rather than George Bush was the current President of the United States.
I have often thought of writing to the Pope and asking him to make Saunders a saint on the grounds a medical miracle occurred.

Wordsmith
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#54
I wonder if they ever worked at the IWM in London. It may answer a few questions.
The NRA museum seemed to enjoy a similar level of klepto attention from its staff. It must be the brilliant wages these organisations pay.
 
#56
As an ex policeman one of them obviously knew how to work the system -
for a while. :oops:
The weakest link is invariably when the trusted 'collector' they first give/trade/sell the weapon to decides to sell it on and it enters the trade and comes up rather brightly on the radar.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#57
The weakest link is invariably when the trusted 'collector' they first give/trade/sell the weapon to decides to sell it on and it enters the trade and comes up rather brightly on the radar.
Assuming its been done legally! If not then the radar doesn't get a blip
 
#58
The person with the guns at home was an employee of the museum. As the guns are traceable to the museum and he had no apparent legitimate reason for them to be at his home (or sold on), his legal defence is going to have to be innovative indeed to get a not guilty plea.

Wordsmith
Who was Onasanya's brief again?? He seems able to win one against the head......
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
#59

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