• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

The wounded platoon on BBC 2

#2
Watching it now, interesting seeing CO's etc and their opinions compared to their soldiers, some of which being interviewed in Prison after returning from Iraq.
 
#6
I think the Yanks could benefit from having some sort of TRiM courses based on the evidence of last night's programme.

Watching this,which highlighted the manpower shortage for "The Surge", it brought home to me how they do everything in terms of numbers and quantity not quality.
 
#7
The quantity not quality rings true.

A lot of these soldiers were on drug programmes after being diagnosed with PTSD from previous tours, it’s incredible that they were scooped up for the “surge” and expected to perform normally? in a Battlefield environment. It’s no wonder that they went a bit OTT in Iraq and even more incredible that they were expected to blend back into peace time mode on their return. The prescription drugs they were given just to get through the day and night would turn them into unfeeling and uncaring Zombies until their reality becomes the norm. Perhaps that’s what the CoC wanted all along.
 
#12
I may not have caught it all (phone call while watching) but I could not understand why there seemed to be query as to why that pln was sustaining higher than average losses? They seemed to be very gung ho and this might have explained it. I am still unsure about the PTSD bit - some of them were pretty psychotic and may have been diagnosed PTSD because they were not closely examined when they got home.
 
#15
I watched the programme, and whilst it was really sad and depressing, I couldn't help thinking that the British Army does not seem to have the same problems, or am I being naive? When my Bn came back from Iraq and Ghanners, sure we had a few numpties who got into a scrape or two (and I am not passing judgement on them, they may have been experiencing PTSD), but on the whole our front line personnel seem to be coping better when returning home. Why are the Yanks having these problems? Are their tours too long? Are their combat units suffering operational overstretch?
 
#16
From a Spam's view

One if the key issues brought up by the program that helps to explain my army's PTSD woes is that of lowered enlistment requirements. When the war in Iraq really started to heat up our political leaders and senior army general decided to issue criminal history waivers for enlistment to young people who would not have been accepted prior to 2003. What's the that wonderful word you have for these types... oh yes... chavs. We basically started to allow a whole lot of chavs into the United States army. Yet another case of the brass taking the easy wrong instead of the hard right.
 
#17
Pretty bloody grim watching , in terms of how not to treat service men (women) did not actually see any females, interested to know if they are having similar problems.
None of these guys should have been discharged or jailed before undergoing physc assessments, and to then boot the one guy out without any help from the vet's administration stinks in my view, irrespective of what he had done, he should have been fixed up ,and then okay your out. As warmonger has stated the goalposts have been moved reference recruiting, i have a nephew in USMC who has said the same thing had been going on with the marines, criminal convictions maybe, but drug offences no way, the u.s. military worked hard in the 80's to spread the "not in my army" doctrine, but seem to be losing their way again, where the hell were the officers and nco's when that clown was kissing and hugging the iraqi women during the follow ups and searches? Are we any better or worse at taking responsibility for the people willing to put themselves on the line? Hope so.
 
#18
From a Spam's view

One if the key issues brought up by the program that helps to explain my army's PTSD woes is that of lowered enlistment requirements. When the war in Iraq really started to heat up our political leaders and senior army general decided to issue criminal history waivers for enlistment to young people who would not have been accepted prior to 2003. What's the that wonderful word you have for these types... oh yes... chavs. We basically started to allow a whole lot of chavs into the United States army. Yet another case of the brass taking the easy wrong instead of the hard right.
When you say "MY ARMY" are you an american / septic ? or a serviceman american/septic???
 
#20
I would think that a 12 or 15 month tour where you´re under constant fire and on fighting patrols,losing or having wounded comrades on a weekly or even daily basis must be totally nerve wrecking,I´d be surprised If anybody could go through that without some kind of mental damage.
After Wars like Korea or Vietnam the soldiers were returned mostly by ship which gave them time to cool off and sort out their demons before they reached home,now they´re back within hours and there´s no rest period between action and peace.You could be walking around during your groceries whilst still being a bit deaf after a grenade blast etc,a bit of a shock even if you´re glad to be home?
 

Latest Threads