"The Woman from NRW, she say No"

ugly

LE
Moderator
#61

ugly

LE
Moderator
#62
I have never shot and killed an animal (except a dog in Afghan and that was only because it was in my GPMG beating zone!) but I've always felt I should try it and eat the end result.

No idea where to start (no guns for one!) or, as I'm now reading, how to do it..... Ethically?

Any pointers?
I'm sure someone down the nick will know!
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#63
I'm sure someone down the nick will know!
Nah, there's no interest here. Not suggesting at all that you might be in for winning every compo we run from now on for kit if you can square me away with a couple of shoots. :mrgreen:
 
#64

ugly

LE
Moderator
#65
I'm given unwanted birds by the keeper off one of the local shoots when he's left with them.
I'm not particulary enamoured to those who shoot the birds, then don't want them.
In a small syndicate like ours we let the beaters take a brace each, then the guns (who have paid for the sport) and finally I get to divvy up whats left around the estate. Often there is nothing left, shooting 20 birds a day with 15 guns and ten beaters means some go without. Many of the beaters take them for friends, its not that they dont want them themselves its that their own freezers like mine are full. I still have geese in there from the summer crop cull of Canada geese. Those aren't being given away to anyone!
Lots of shoots didn't used to give birds away, then came the glut and the Eu regs shut down little game dealers everywhere meaning bags of less than 200 weren't economical to collect. Shoots started to prep oven ready ones for guns to take which usually means you aren't getting the birds you shoot. The guns aren't there to fill the freezer on the big shoots they re usually there for the company and sport. No different to them than watching boxing or horse racing!
The attitude slowly changed with the introduction of take home oven readies but frankly shoots can give game to charities if only the charities were amenable. They are in Canada and the USA but here its seen as dirty. Public urban led tastes mean that countryfolk take home and eat. The others can carry on as long as it keeps estates afloat and the industry alive. They have to follow a code of conduct to advertise on certain means.
But it doesn't affect Ravers and I and frankly we dont care if you dont like it!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#66
Nah, there's no interest here. Not suggesting at all that you might be in for winning every compo we run from now on for kit if you can square me away with a couple of shoots. :mrgreen:
Nobs will get you beating, a good shoot will have a beaters day. Its free and art of the payback for the seasons work. After a season you should be swamped with invitations. Ravers is closer to you geographically so ping him, that said he has more free kit than the QM!
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#67
Nobs will get you beating, a good shoot will have a beaters day. Its free and art of the payback for the seasons work. After a season you should be swamped with invitations. Ravers is closer to you geographically so ping him, that said he has more free kit than the QM!
I may do - though I'm terrified he's running some sort of Hostel-esque torture/sex dungeon place from what I've been hearing.

Also, FYI, cough cough

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/t...pro-military-down-jacket.287286/#post-8858298
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#68
Game shooting/hunting is a triple threat to any standard lefty
If you dont like the thread put us all on ignore or just **** off from the thread!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#69
Depends on how many deer you harvest to be honest. If you shoot one or two a year and use the plot to feed the rest during the lean times I would say no. If you just use it to bait them and shoot whatever walks into it during the season so you can rack up the body county it is a bit frowned upon.....
On the low ground here its common to site blinds or high seats near crops that attract the deer not the other way around. Planting crops on your own ground isn't as simple as you would like to believe. As a small island we are heavily populated with deer. Scotland is particularly bad but when the Deer Commission says you must shoot 2000 head on your ground and at the end of the season you dont produce the game records agreed with the game dealer they come in and cull then send you the bill. We have Muntjac here now (Sussex) an agricultural pest and its one of the most difficult deer to manage. They can be very shy but they damage crops and shrubs at an alarming rate. Salt licks and molasses on fence posts can help in getting them to an area where they can be culled but nothing is guaranteed and the crops come first and their protection.
 
#71
On the low ground here its common to site blinds or high seats near crops that attract the deer not the other way around. Planting crops on your own ground isn't as simple as you would like to believe. As a small island we are heavily populated with deer. Scotland is particularly bad but when the Deer Commission says you must shoot 2000 head on your ground and at the end of the season you dont produce the game records agreed with the game dealer they come in and cull then send you the bill. We have Muntjac here now (Sussex) an agricultural pest and its one of the most difficult deer to manage. They can be very shy but they damage crops and shrubs at an alarming rate. Salt licks and molasses on fence posts can help in getting them to an area where they can be culled but nothing is guaranteed and the crops come first and their protection.

I tend to think that deer hunting in the UK would be similar to hunting on the East Coast. My fil has 40 acres in NC, and they have quite a few places to set up blinds, and they try to keep the deer population under control. The White Tails eat his crops and are a nuisance. Out in the West we have our Mulies and a few White Tails which are pretty stout compared to their peers out East but hunting them is all glassing and stalking. Setting up plots is just not feasible unless you own the land to hunt on. However hunting and the brutal winters tend to keep the population under control and at reasonable levels.

How big do the Muntjac get? How in the hell did an Asian species get introduced to the UK btw??
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#72
Added to that feeding near access roads in scotland is an accepted practice. The deer in general aren't shot on the feed but it ensures the vitamins they miss in harsh winters are available and that the Ghillie will know where they will be at certain times.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#73
How big do the Muntjac get? How in the hell did an Asian species get introduced to the UK btw??
Mainly from private park herds which escaped over the years. They tend to be about the size of a large spaniel/small Labrador. Judging distance is fun!
STALKC9%20-%20Deer%20Identification%20Sheet%20(BDS)-320x320.jpg

I used to keep a copy of this with me all of the time!
Its available for less than £2 from the BDS shop online
 
#74
This year I've bagged 20 ducks and five Canadian geese, a week ago I took a doe. All are now in the freezer ready to be eaten. By around August of next year they will all have been consumed. As far as deer are concerned I don't sit in a blind and wait for them to show up.

I spend a good part of the year getting to know their habits, where they bed down, what trails they mostly use where they are feeding. Unfortunately for me all that can be undone if the large predators such as wolves or mountain lions show up in the area.

My views on large predators showing up is one of they have to eat as well and I can always go to the shops for food if the year is a bust. I do hate it though when I come across an untouched deer carcass that the wolves have killed just for the fun of it, on the other hand that carcass will supply food for the other critters of the woods and mountains.
 
#75
The attitude slowly changed with the introduction of take home oven readies but frankly shoots can give game to charities if only the charities were amenable. They are in Canada and the USA but here its seen as dirty.
Donating food to charity is nightmarish complicated and costs money

We donate food to the local homeless shelter but do so fairly informally. One of the vans drops off some of the over production 3 or 4 times a week

We did a lot of work with a couple of national charities recently trying to sort out donating foodstuffs.
After a vast amount of time and effort wasted I wouldn't bother trying again, complete waste of time which culminated in them expecting us to pay them to take it.
Don't expect the charities to be amenable or even ethical, most of their interest lies in getting their wages paid, charitable works come after that. Its bugger all to do with how they view game shooting and all to do with them having to make some effort, they don't like to do that.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#76
Don't expect the charities to be amenable or even ethical, most of their interest lies in getting their wages paid, charitable works come after that. Its bugger all to do with how they view game shooting and all to do with them having to make some effort, they don't like to do that.
Yet the yanks manage it easily
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#77
#78
Only if you tell coke can. My planting a cover crop for the birds that provides feed for the deer must be making his head explode!
Big thing here is we are starting to harvest field corn (for the next month at least) and with the combines comes a lots of spillage, so deer aren’t exactly scarce. As long as I get my freezer full, coke can is more than welcome to come watch. Guess he’d have a stroke if he knew some farmers burn the corn stubble and drive the deer out of the fields......
 

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