"The Wild Geese" Trivia Q

Love it. I wonder if she got through to him on that occasion.

Talking of Burton, there's a good one about his performance in Villain (1971) as the Ronnie Kray-type gangster Vic Dakin. Ian McShane got cast as Dakin's boyfriend, and later recalled a conversation with his co-star that weirded him out a bit:

RB: I'm really glad you're in this film, Ian.
IMS: That makes two of us, Richard.
RB: You know why I'm so happy, don't you?
IMS: Errr ... nope ... why?
RB: You remind me of Liz.
Watched that the other night.

Not a bad film in terms of nostalgia of how London use to look.

Also liked the heist scene where the security guards are fighting off burton's crew like it's their own money

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:
Watched that the other night.

Not a bad film in terms of nostalgia of how London use to look.

Also liked the heist scene where the security guards are fighting off burton's crew like it's their own money

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
It's on my 'to watch' list.

Regarding the heist, given that the film seems to have been based on real crime cases, I'm wondering if it might have been based on the 'Battle of London Airport' in July 1948. Some firm wanted to nick £15m of valuables (using current figures) from the BOAC warehouse in Heathrow, and attempted to drug the security guards beforehand.

Flying Squad got to hear about it, and replaced security with their own officers in security guard uniforms, apparently doped. When the thieves turned up, the 'drugged' officers suddenly came to life and went for the arrest. The whole thing got rather 'Sweeney', and there was added confusion because both the cops and the robbers were all dressed alike.
 
We didn't want to rescue Limbani!
I can't recall if he did survive, it has been a while since I watched the film and on that occasion I was stuck in BMH Hanover so there wasn't a lot else to do.

Perhaps it will be the main Christmas film on one channel or another on the big day in which case I might watch it again, so please don't spoil the end for me.
 
I can't recall if he did survive, it has been a while since I watched the film and on that occasion I was stuck in BMH Hanover so there wasn't a lot else to do.

Perhaps it will be the main Christmas film on one channel or another on the big day in which case I might watch it again, so please don't spoil the end for me.
Dies on the 'plane after dictating a political message that will prove he is onboard so that the gang can get clearance from ATC at Salisbury (or Harare, as it is ironically known these days) to enter Rhodie airspace and land at Kariba, if I remember rightly.
 
Dies on the 'plane after dictating a political message that will prove he is onboard so that the gang can get clearance from ATC at Salisbury (or Harare, as it is ironically known these days) to enter Rhodie airspace and land at Kariba, if I remember rightly.
Yep. He does die on the plane. Not sure if he survives in Carney's original book, "The Thin White Line", which became "The Wild Geese".
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
a few more cap badges
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Yep. He does die on the plane. Not sure if he survives in Carney's original book, "The Thin White Line", which became "The Wild Geese".
I think he does. Faulkner definitely gets killed in Carney's novel. There are some other differences, notably:

(1) Rafer Janders (who is American in the book) is the one who gets into a feud with the mafia.
(2) Pieter Coetzee is Rhodesian rather than an Afrikaner.
(3) There's a rather bollocks romantic sub-plot involving two officers (who provide the basis for Moore's character) while they're training in Mozambique (which was a Portuguese colony at the time of writing). Both go AWOL and end up trying to shag two call-girls, and one of them falls in love with his.
(4) Matheson and MI6 don't actually betray the mercs. The mission falls apart because Faulkner and his men don't secure the airfield before the Simbas turn up.
 
Just recalled a vignette in Melvin Bragg's biography of Burton (excellent book). During the filming of Wild Geese, Elizabeth Taylor, decides to phone Burton as she's all alone in LA.
Apparently it goes like this:
La Taylor "May I speak to Richard Burton please"?
Bartender "Certainly madam, is he black or white"?
An article about Roger and Wild Geese where it mentions how OJ Simpson nearly got Roger Moore's role because American agents didn't know what "black Irish" meant

Roger Moore talks 'Wild Geese'
 
Although I get your point in that the film portrayed Coetzee as South African.
Doubtless for some sort of politcal agenda on the part of the director/screenwriter...

 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
Genuine question:
What as the logic in putting some of the Para Reg blokes in brown berets ?
Does anyone know if the book clarifies this ?
I don't think logic featured in it at all. I'm going to hazard a guess that it was probably a costume dept. free for all. Incidentally, the only cap badges that were actually worn on khaki berets at the time of the film were the Foot Guards and R. Anglians (other infantry regiments continued with dark blue until the winter of 1982-3).
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Fishsoxs The NAAFI Bar 21
DieHard Films, Music and All Things Artsy 13
the_boy_syrup The NAAFI Bar 558

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top