The 'What did they die for' thread

Why would you have died for the army?

  • To get away from an abusive family

    Votes: 4 4.9%
  • To get away from a place with no job prospects

    Votes: 20 24.4%
  • To avoid ending up in prison through bad life choices

    Votes: 4 4.9%
  • Because they had no education to speak of

    Votes: 4 4.9%
  • Because life had just shat them out and they had no other option available to them

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Because they were in a rut and couldn't find another way out

    Votes: 10 12.2%
  • For shits and giggles

    Votes: 40 48.8%

  • Total voters
    82
Not that easy. King penguins are just the right height to smash you in the balls with their beaks, the dirty rats. Try walking through a nesting colony with your arms folded if you want a test of real courage.

It's not real courage in your case though, is it? Your hooves are so big they'd trip over them and land flat on their beak before they got you.
 
And that's why you get GEAS training.
No offence to the poster but the last time I heard GEAS Training discussed was at PTA meeting at the boys first school. The 'progressive' parent who proposed it was left in no doubt that either he shut up or he could toss a coin as to how he would be leaving the room, on a stretcher or in a body bag.
MNP*

*motion not passed
 
No offence to the poster but the last time I heard GEAS Training discussed was at PTA meeting at the boys first school. The 'progressive' parent who proposed it was left in no doubt that either he shut up or he could toss a coin as to how he would be leaving the room, on a stretcher or in a body bag.
MNP*

*motion not passed

Ground Effect Air Swirl.

Nothing to do with children.
 
There, fixed it for you.... no, no thanks needed.
Image7.jpg
 
Ground Effect Air Swirl.

Nothing to do with children.
Whenever I had a 'dink' in a police vehicle I blamed the sudden appearance of SBD* but lightning reflex's that preserved a life, albeit some bodywork was now required at taxpayers expense.

Whenever a para ends up upside down with his strides around his knees it is GEAS.
(Do drop zones have a garage sergeant on call?

*Some Black Dog
 
It crossed my mind during my last year at school, a couple of my teachers were in WW2 (one was at Arnhem). Some lads had already been accepted for juniors. I toyed with it for a couple of years, then decided to do it. Three years turned in to five, turned into eight etc. Did about eleven in the end. Quite a few joined from my school, three just from my class, two Fusiliers, one REME. Seemed to be a thing in the eighties.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
I joined the Army because the RAF didn't want me. Or rather, they said "Right young TMW, you've passed all the tests, and we're delighted to offer you a position in 1986." This was in 1984. So I went round the corner and joined the Army, served 25 years in the REME, then 5 as a REME STAB.

Why I wanted to serve?

Partly because I was and am a patriot, and believe that our nation is in general on the side of right. It was the height of the cold war and unsurprisingly I was of the opinion that I didn't want my parents and sisters to be incinerated, and having seen the state of CND placed no faith in their path to peace. A strong military seemed a logical and desirable option, and I wanted to play my part. I read Heinlein's "Starship Troopers" as a young teen, and the ethos of that book stuck with me: to serve and fight for your tribe is honourable.

Partly because it was 1984, there were 3 million unemployed and I lived in the west midlands; manufacturing was on its arse and I had few qualifications. I was probably destined to sign on, work as an office clerk or flip burgers, and the Army was an escape from that dull, bleak existence. I was on the YTS and working for Provident Personal Credit as a trainee loan clerk, by the time I left for basic training in '85 I'd been offered a permanent job there. I sometimes think what that path would have led to; nowhere I would want to be I think.

What did they die for?

For many, they died for their comrades, it's a cliche because it's true. And as CSgt Bourne says in Zulu, "Because we're 'ere, lad"; another cliche and another truth. I'm sure there were some idealists who utterly believed in the mission and died in Afghanistan with a Union Jack on their shoulder too.
 
Someone once said in my presence that soldiers were happy to die if they were killed doing their job.

I responded by saying don’t be so f*cking stupid. Nobody wants to die or is happy at the prospect of it happening.

It is in some circumstances a possibility that might happen as a consequence of where you are and what you are doing but every soldier will do everything in their power to avoid ending up in that situation.

In fact, a lot of training in the infantry is designed to prepare you to operate in a way that avoids being killed even in dangerous circumstances.

Sometimes though, it can and does happen.

Those that have lost their lives were doing their jobs. Their deaths were certainly not in vain. Why would anybody take the risks that soldiers are sometimes compelled to take if it was for nothing.

Those soldiers will never be forgotten by those that are still here and in the meantime, those still serving will continue to do a fantastic job wherever they are required to do so and we all pray that they will keep coming home safely.
 
It's not real courage in your case though, is it? Your hooves are so big they'd trip over them and land flat on their beak before they got you.

They have long beaks. High speed smack in the passion fruit can slow the world down in a nasty manner for a few seconds and concentrate the attention.
 
Crabeaters are in a class of their own. You can smell their breath/burps from the deck of the Babelaas while they're parked on an ice floe at water level.

dsc_1165.514x600.jpg
 

Robme

LE
None of the above. I was a pad’s brat and thus the Army was all I ever knew.
Joined because I wanted to and left for the same reasons
Would rejoin tomorrow jag the same knaves, spivs and crooks were there. But not the woke snowflake outfit it has become.
Like many people who served, dying early came with the job and I never thought about it.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
None of the above. I was a pad’s brat and thus the Army was all I ever knew.
Joined because I wanted to and left for the same reasons
Would rejoin tomorrow jag the same knaves, spivs and crooks were there. But not the woke snowflake outfit it has become.
Like many people who served, dying early came with the job and I never thought about it.
Seems dying didn't come early enough though eh?
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Like many people who served, dying early came with the job and I never thought about it.
I bet everyone else in your section did though.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I joined up for the free socks. I miss them, alot.
 

Proff3RTR

Old-Salt
As surely as I can't nail two bits of wood together without causing an explosion, the press is now starting to fill up with pictures of soldiers coffins and 'what did they die for?' heart-wrenching spiel.

With my blood currently boiling over and out of various orifices, I feel compelled to mention to people that dare utter that sentence near me that they died for:

A wage

Because sure as shit no-one I shared a squeaky bum moment with was ever in Iraq or Afghan to 'free the people' or change the way the country worked. Every single one of us was there because we were getting paid a fairly decent wedge of cash to do so, and also someone with a pointy stick would shout at us and make us do press-ups if we didn't.

If we look even deeper than that though, there are numerous other examples of what they died for:

1. To get away from an abusive family
2. To get away from a place with no job prospects
3. To avoid ending up in prison through bad life choices
4. Because they had no education to speak of
5. Because life had just shat them out and they had no other option available to them
6. Because they were in a rut and couldn't find another way out (this is me)
7. For shits and giggles (That'd be the guy who in my basic, said he joined up as he was on his way to Borders bookshop to pick up FHM and thought '**** it, why not' as he passed the recruitment centre)

As in, they died because they joined the army.

It's a fairly reasonable assumption to make that doing one would lead to the other - history tends to have a good supply of examples, and yet we are treated with the woes and wails of people who maybe need to look a bit harder at themselves for the reasons that young Johnny fucked off and joined up.

We lost three lads in Herrick. Absolutely devastating. There's nothing like holding the upper half of a grown man, trying to figure out how to put an FFD over the open wound that is their entire waist as he gently moans out before dying to put things into perspective, but each one had in theory of a choice to not go, not to do it, not to be there. It started with not signing up in the first place, or simply refusing to soldier and taking the hit that comes with that.

Yet they signed, they went, and each one was there doing a ******* top notch job. Each one also knew what a waste of time it was being there and how things would go to shit the moment we left, even as soon as 500m down the road when the insurgents would just wander back in and knock **** out of the villagers we just tried to protect.

We can blame politicians, and rightly so for making such ill advised commitments, but whether wee Johnny was in the army or not wouldn't have mattered, the army would have still been sent to Iraq, Herrick, Glasgow, or some other place at some other point in time and people would still have died.

I would like to think we all knew the risks we took on. None of these lads were stupid (well....) and there wasn't one of us who wasn't afraid at some point, but we cracked on, did our job to the best of our abilities and maybe, just maybe, made a wee difference for someone, somewhere out there, however temporary.

The press and families making a big grieving show about all of this now the inevitable has happened and they should realise how much they're disrespecting their lost loved one, and realise that if that soldier could speak to them from the grave, it would probably be to say, "Get a ******* grip mum. The rest of the lads up here are laughing at me.".

So, if you had been deployed and killed, what would it have been for?

The poll is up. If it's not there, let's hear it. 'Got a lass pregnant, dad was a monster, had to flee for my life', 'Whistled on a Tuesday', etc.
For me, I was in a rut of work and nothing else, and needed to get out of it.

P.S - Worth keeping an eye on Snapchat. Go to the world map, tap on Kabul. Some very interesting videos there of chaos, panic and suddenly lots of guns.

EDIT: The options are mainly negative (as pointed out) because it's aimed at the people wailing and grieving (or attention whoring, as it's known) who maybe were to blame or could've fixed those reasons. Plenty of people joined for solid, strong and sensible reasons - career, Queen & Country, getting your hole etc, but my anger is aimed at those people who could really have helped young Johnny onto a different path if, as a parent, they'd actually given a ****.
The best serious post I have read here, my hat is off to you my friend, and having ‘been there’ as they say I fully agree, if it was my time to get it I would say this, it would of been for the man to my left and right. And yes, there were times in NI, Iraq & Afghan when I was shitting myself, but you just dealt with it, and you dealt with it for them, no one else, for your mates who were dealing with it the same as you were, and for one I always hoped if it was my time it would be quick.
 
None of the above. I was a pad’s brat and thus the Army was all I ever knew.
Joined because I wanted to and left for the same reasons
Would rejoin tomorrow jag the same knaves, spivs and crooks were there. But not the woke snowflake outfit it has become.
Like many people who served, dying early came with the job and I never thought about it.
The bit I hate most about today's army is those that claim they have a MM, MiD, OBE and to have been in the SAS.

What do you think about those that claim things like that, which are patently untrue?
 
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