The Weasel Cameron.

clever_teacher_lady

Swinger
Book Reviewer
#1
So is David Cameron going to manage to crawl as far up Obama's arse as Blair did with Bush? He has certainly got off to a good start stickin it to the Jocks with it 'wisna me that let that bastard Magrahi go it wiz them....
 

clever_teacher_lady

Swinger
Book Reviewer
#3
Magrahi was released on compassionate grounds as per Scottish law, not really a case of biggin it up on the world stage, simply following recognised protocol. Cameron should respect and support this as despite what many Jocks feel we are still the same country. Hence my feeling that Cameron is stickin it to the Jocks to crawl up Obama.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#4
Yet another one over-obsessing about our relationship with the US are we:

David Cameron: don't obsess about US-UK special relationship | Politics | The Guardian

David Cameron: don't obsess about US-UK special relationship


Prime minister says Britain can no longer rely on 60-year-old version of special relationship
David Cameron begins two days of talks with Barack Obama and senior US administration officials in Washington today, saying he is frustrated by Britain's preoccupation with the health of the "special relationship".
He urges everyone to stop taking the relationship's pulse every second, and recognise that in a modern world Britain and the US will search the globe for a variety of alliances.
His remarks, in an article in the Wall Street Journal, represent the most considered account of his view of the relationship, and are designed to frame a more mature alliance in which Britain recognises it can no longer rely solely on a 60-year-old version of the relationship.
Cameron says he has "never understood the British anxiety about whether the special relationship will survive. The US-UK relationship is strong, because it delivers for both of us. The alliance is not sustained by historical ties or blind loyalty. This is a partnership of choice that serves our national interests today." He faces potentially difficult talks on issues such as Afghanistan, and the global economy, including trade and the role of BP in the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.
Cameron privately believes that the Brown government became obsessed with the symbols of the relationship, and he wants instead to form a special relationship with India, a country he will visit with five other cabinet ministers and a host of business leaders next week.
In a break with Foreign Office practice, Cameron says he disagrees with the US on trade with China. He is due to meet Obama in the White House today, as well as meeting congressional leaders and Pentagon officials. The prime minister claims to see three different sets of misguided analysts ceaselessly fretting over the special relationship: "Those who question the whole concept; those who say it is no longer special; and those fixated on form rather than substance." The anti-American school is "plain wrong", in that America is a force for good, fighting terrorism, seeking peace in the Middle East, and championing the struggle against climate change.
Those who claim the relationship is no longer special due to Britain's inability to bring enough to the table, according to Cameron, ignore the strength of Britain's international relations, the reputation of its armed forces, and the co-operation between the two states' intelligence agencies. He reserves his strongest condemnation for those who "over-analyse the relationship's atmospherics", forensically compute the length of the meetings "whether it is a brush-by or a full bilateral", the number of mentions in a president's speech, the location and grandeur of the press conference, and whether the two leaders stand up or even sit down together. "This sort of Kremlinology might have had its place in interpreting our relations with Moscow during the cold war. It is absurd to apply it to our oldest and staunchest ally."
Britain should recognise it is the junior partner, he says, but behave as a country clear and strong in its values. It should recognise the US is strengthening its ties with rising powers, and do the same. "To do so is both pro-American and pro-British because it is the only way we will maintain our influence," he says.
The prime minister had no differences with the US over the release, by the Scottish executive, of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, convicted of the Lockerbie bombing: "I never saw the case for releasing him, and I think it was a very bad decision."
Last night the PM was forced to reject a request for a meeting with a concerned group of senators, blaming the tight schedule of the two-day tour, which will also take in a meeting with UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon in New York.
He will try to play down the BP issue, to prevent limitless compensation claims piling on the firm. But in a sign of the anxiety at the performance of Obama in some Tory circles, the former cabinet minister John Redwood wrote in his blog: "Mr Obama has declared war on BP, and sought to represent this global company as some kind of British destructive force in the USA. The president is getting a reputation for being anti business, and seems to like having a foreign business whipping boy. His interventions have not helped control the leak or deal with the disaster."
 
#5
I think it more a matter of sticking it to the last government and he did say at the time that it was a bad decision.

The Scottish Government fucked up and it does no harm to admit as such. It was an insult to the relatives of the victims and they got no consideration whatsoever from the Scottish Law Minister.

This stupid decision pissed off a hell of a lot of septics and Cameroon is just trying a damage limitation exercise IMO.

Good luck to him.
 
#6
I'm not too bothered about him sucking up to the President after all Cameron will want many things that the President can either provide or deny him. What twists my scrot is when Cameron says he doesn't have time to talk to congressmen and a few hours later is, what a pussy.
 
#7
Magrahi was released on compassionate grounds as per Scottish law, not really a case of biggin it up on the world stage, simply following recognised protocol. Cameron should respect and support this as despite what many Jocks feel we are still the same country. Hence my feeling that Cameron is stickin it to the Jocks to crawl up Obama.
Bit unfortunate the way things have panned out since, though, isn't it? Megrahi was released on a 3-month-to-go chit in Aug 09, and he's still on the go now (some 11 months later). I think that the right thing was done in that if they genuinely thought he had that little time left (and that was in the opinion of 3 independent oncologists, if what I read was correct. It'll be interesting to see when he does pop his clogs though....!!!!
 
#9
I think that if he had stayed in prison he would have died by now. The sweet taste of freedom can give the very sick a new lease of life. Ronnie Biggs proved that. I think the Scottish Parliament made a just and fair decision given the information they were; in all things there should be compassion.
In the case of Cameron he should have consulted with his Scottish counterparts to ascertain exactly why the decision was made and should have done his best to get their point, or at least their reasoning, across. He can still say that it was a decision he wasn't comfortable with but it was the Scottish Parliament's decision to make, not his. Since we share foreign policy and Westminster takes precedence on that we would have done better to present a united front.
This is all about getting at BP who the Senate seems to think are behind the release, will we be hearing about the BP plot to assassinate JFK next?
As there were US victims it is only fair for the US to make representations to the Scottish Courts but they do not control any British Parliament nor do they decide our law.
 
#10
I think it more a matter of sticking it to the last government and he did say at the time that it was a bad decision.

The Scottish Government fucked up and it does no harm to admit as such. It was an insult to the relatives of the victims and they got no consideration whatsoever from the Scottish Law Minister.

This stupid decision pissed off a hell of a lot of septics and Cameroon is just trying a damage limitation exercise IMO.

Good luck to him.
No according to Dr Jim Swire on local news earlier on.



Is he going to push as hard to find out who actually did it or is he just frantically snatching for headlines in the US press?
Of course he isn't going to go for an inquiry. The Americans don't want one either. There are too many things they don't want to come out.
 
#12
Is he going to push as hard to find out who actually did it or is he just frantically snatching for headlines in the US press?
Probably not a good idea to open that can of worms since it could well lead to Eyeran. That's one conspiracy theory at least.

Or the CIA paying witnesses:

Former State Department lawyer Michael Scharf confirmed that rewards were paid in the context of the Lockerbie trial.

'"I knew that rewards payments were made, but not the amount. The Awards for Terrorism Information program has been around since the 1980s, and has been expanded to rewards for information leading to the arrest or conviction of international indicted war criminals like Karadzic and Mladic. When I worked at the Office of the Legal Adviser of the State Department I was involved in the program."
 
#18
I'm not too bothered about him sucking up to the President after all Cameron will want many things that the President can either provide or deny him. What twists my scrot is when Cameron says he doesn't have time to talk to congressmen and a few hours later is, what a pussy.
Don't forget that 2 of the main audiences he has are Fox News and CNN. They will whip up hysteria at the drop of a hat and I am afraid the American public is now thoroughly accustomed to having their opinions fed to them. The American public is also extremely vocal when it comes to expressing their displeasure and disposing of serving politians has become something of a national pass-time at the moment. With congressional and senatorial elections in the pipeline, they will bend over backwards to show just how much they agree with everything the public says. Agreeing to these meetings is about showing the public that the UK leadership is taking the matter seriously, because if they are satisfied the politicians are satisfied and will not cause trouble.

On the original point though if the cap fits wear it. If everyone thought it was a bad idea except the Scottish government then they should carry the can, I think they should expect the same loyalty they would be willing to show to a conservative government. That being said if releasing him early meant that we made billions of pounds worth of tax revenue and created jobs then I couldn't care less. The moral high ground is all very well, but it doesn't put food on the table.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#19
Kenny MacAskill was very good on Radio Scotland today
He stated that he made decision on basis of three reports as required by Scottish Law.
The Director of Health and Social Care for Scottish Prisons
The Prison Governor
The Parole board.

Magrahi had poor prognosis (though as pointed out above, a change in circumstances can change a medical condition) and he was very unlikely to reoffend

Dr Jim Squires, daughter died in the incident has called it a brave but fair decision .

Cameron is a slimy wee toad who can say what he likes but he has no say in Scottish Law and the Scottish legal system.

The decision to release Megrahi was correct, and I admire Kenny MacAskill for having the balls to do it and to stand up whilst doing it and say it was his responsibility as Justice Minister to take that decision and his alone. Well done to Alec Salmond for standing by his minister.

It's good to see some backbone and resolve in politics
 

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