The Vulcan Bomber

#1
On "The Military History Channel" just now, an hour long documentary about Vulcans. I saw one of these beasts at an airshow when I was about 13 and never forgot the noise.

Getting to fly / work on a toy like that; jammy old b*****ds.............
 
#2
chasndave said:
On "The Military History Channel" just now, an hour long documentary about Vulcans. I saw one of these beasts at an airshow when I was about 13 and never forgot the noise.

Getting to fly / work on a toy like that; jammy old b*****ds.............
Take a trip to Newark, they got one you can climb about in there
 
#4
Quite a few around the country, RAF Museum at Hendon, RAF Museum at Cosford, IWM Duxford, and one remaining at RAF Waddington (although its within the airfield perimeter fence)as well as the one mentioned at Newark above.The flying one is based at Bruntingthorpe, not sure how close you can get to that one.

They were an awesome sight to see when they flew, remember family postings at Scampton and Akrotiri during the '60s and '70s and was lucky enough to watch the last one flying over my garden on its final flight as an RAF aircraft. I well remember watching one doing the bombing run at the range off Episkopi, certainly an impressive sight to see 21 X 1000lb bombs being dropped into the sea. Nothing like the sound of the Quick Reaction taking off from Scampton during the cold war practises.....
 
#5
Watching footage of the 4-ships; there just wasn't enough in the way of black smoke coming out of the back of those things!!!

RR Olympus engines, if I'm not sounding like too much of a sad spotter.....????
 
#6
Latest news looks to be that XH558, the last flyable Vulcan, may be airworthy again in time for RIAT at Fairford this year.
 
#7
At the time of living in Scampton, in the '60s there wasnt a single window in the house that didnt have vibration cracks in them, the noise from those Olympus engines was so loud.

I well remember the day one of the Vulcans ventured off the runway, following a crash landing, into the car park of the control tower!
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
One on the runway and seventeen in the peat if I remember rightly.

But a very impressive aircraft - I saw Roly Falk slow roll one at Farnborough in the 1950s.
 
#10
Is it rude of me to laugh at the doddering old nav being hung up from a forklift to test the new harnesses?

It's all a bit Camp Breadbasket, is it not...???

PS Dave Thomas taught me, years ago! Bloody hell!
 
#11
Late 80s XH 558 spent a short spell at Scampton during Waddos runway repair. Fortunately I got to look around the jet and took quite a few piccies that are posted on http://www.site.vulcantothesky.org/galleries.asp

This the only remaing Vulcan that did all the roles that the Vulcan ever carried out, bomber, maritime recce, and AAR. It was fitted out for the Thunderbolt with strengthened mains spars, which is why it's in such good nick and has so many airframe hours left.

Tin Triangles :D forever.
 
#12
Many years ago when I was walking the Eildon Hills with my then young son we saw two . We were actually higher than the aircraft … it was an incredible sight to see them majestically flying across our line of walking and then the sound as they started to move away from us was deafening .
 
#13
Drlligaf said:
Late 80s XH 558 spent a short spell at Scampton during Waddos runway repair. Fortunately I got to look around the jet and took quite a few piccies that are posted on http://www.site.vulcantothesky.org/galleries.asp

This the only remaing Vulcan that did all the roles that the Vulcan ever carried out, bomber, maritime recce, and AAR. It was fitted out for the Thunderbolt with strengthened mains spars, which is why it's in such good nick and has so many airframe hours left.

Tin Triangles :D forever.
Cheers Driligaf

Some of those shots are absolutely outstanding. They sure don't build them like that any more....!!!!
 
#14
It was a dreadful machine, obsolete pretty much as soon as it entered sevice. Not the least objectionable part of its legacy was the effect it (and the other Vs) had on the wider RAF and on rear crew training in particular - even the term 'rear crew' is a symptom. Sit at the arrse end and fly backwards - they even designed the Dominie around the concept as a mini V. Vile machines. A first posting to Vs was regarded as a fate worse than death by my contemporaries.
 
#15
seaweed said:
One on the runway and seventeen in the peat if I remember rightly.

But a very impressive aircraft - I saw Roly Falk slow roll one at Farnborough in the 1950s.
About a 150,000 tons of fuel with about A2A 11 refuelings. On the 2nd run the bombs weren't armed. What was wrong with using Sea Harriers or GR3's?
 
#16
chasndave said:
RR Olympus engines, if I'm not sounding like too much of a sad spotter.....????
BRISTOL Olympus...

Although to be fair RR did take over when all aero engine manufacture was centralised at RR..

Edited coz I can't speel 'fair'
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#18
I was at school in Seaham, Co Durham on 7 January 1871.

End of lesson, I walked into a classroom to find pupils and teacher still sat there, all with dropped jaws, looking out of the south facing window in the direction of Wingate, where they had just watched the final seconds of this:

http://www.neam.co.uk/wingate.html

Compare with the prologue of Vulcan 607 and the crew list for the designated bomber on Black Buck 1 (which aborted shortly after take-off, leaving 607, the designated back-up, to fly the mission).
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
Vasco said:
It was a dreadful machine, obsolete pretty much as soon as it entered sevice. Not the least objectionable part of its legacy was the effect it (and the other Vs) had on the wider RAF and on rear crew training in particular - even the term 'rear crew' is a symptom. Sit at the arrse end and fly backwards - they even designed the Dominie around the concept as a mini V. Vile machines. A first posting to Vs was regarded as a fate worse than death by my contemporaries.
if that is the case, how do you account for their showing in NATO exercises and on the Black Buck missions? they were hardly up against third world opponents on either occasion I would have thought.
 
#20
The bombs were fused on the 2nd Blackbuck - if not, something extra-terrestrial caused damage at the western end of the runway.

The fusing error may - or may not, it depends upon the source - have occurred on the last Blackbuck sortie, which was targeted against airfield facilities and not against the runway. The bombs were meant to be airburst, but might (again, depends on the source) have been impact fused. Even if they were wrongly fused, notable damage was caused.

The SHARs and GR3s could and did loft bombs against the airfield, with little success in terms of cratering the runway.

Laydown attacks were unlikely to work because the bombs would skip rather than penetrate the runway surface. End result - precious Harriers exposed to AAA with extremely low likelihood of the attack succeeding.

It should also be noted that of the five people most eager to see the Vulcan raids take place, four were Admirals (Leach, Woodward, Fieldhouse and Lewin), with the fifth being AOC 1 Group. The Chief of the Air Staff made clear that if the Vulcan was to shut the runway entirely, he'd want to launch 25 and preferably 50 sorties because the Vulcan's kit wasn't up to the task of achieving the necessary precision (missing the aiming point in a Russian city by 500 yards with a Yellow Sun or WE177 didn't really matter that much, so the cost of getting the latest navkit and weapons aiming gear on the Vulcan was never going to get past the Treasury...)
 

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