The Universal Carrier

It's the carrier version of a hedgehog then! But the limited range of the PIAT must have been a disadvantage.
There's been discussion of that too. @Listy is your chap for discussion of range when the PIAT was used as a mortar but a canal's width and beyond (that is, some hundreds of yards). There are few photos on the PIAT thread of the weapon in use as a mortar.
Cool-looking thing (the PIAT carrier multiple mortar).
 
Last edited:
I've no problem with the PIAT being used as a mortar, it has a rudimentary inclinometer built in after all, and that's why the white stripe is painted on as well. But being hollow charge it's only going to have much effect if it hits a hardened target??? I'll dip into the PIAT thread.
 
It's the carrier version of a hedgehog then! But the limited range of the PIAT must have been a disadvantage.
It looks like an extreme example of the EM's handiwork - "I dare you to fire these off while going flat out in reverse".
 
Extract from the book The Bren Gun Carrier Story.

Screenshot_20181020-121930_Samsung Internet.jpg


Wouldn't it make more sense if it was used as an ambush type weapon, fire and try and get a hit on the upper surfaces of a tank where the armour is thinnest and then leggit at full speed? The effect of 14 bombs raining down would hopefully keep the enemies heads down!
 
Last edited:
I'll bite :)
What's wrong with the Matilda? (colour scheme?)
Correct.

The story of sky blue in caunter camo goes back to the 70s. A certain very well known museum, who shall remain nameless (Face the bloody wall IWM!) Wanted to paint it's A12 in caunter. So they went to look up the exact colours from accounts, and do all that lengthy research into period colours etc etc...

Not a hope, they grabbed the airfix kit and coppied that. The airfix kit had a typo on the colour chat, and had the wrong colour code.

Soon every bloody place was copying the sky blue. The above picture was taken at Bovy.

So two of the big guardians of historical facts ballsed it up. Equally look at some of the YouTube videos that Bovy are putting out. They contain easy to errors, and this is with people like David Willey or David Fletcher giving the presentation. Just because a museum says it, doesn't mean it's any more credible than your mate down the pub. To stand a chance you need to find a SME on the topic.
 
Extract from the book The Bren Gun Carrier Story.

View attachment 358292

Wouldn't it make more sense if it was used as an ambush type weapon, fire and try and get a hit on the upper surfaces of a tank where the armour is thinnest and then leggit at full speed? The effect of 14 bombs raining down would hopefully keep the enemies heads down!
That's a good theory. An anti-armour mortar, with the natural dispersal of the rounds in flight allowing for a degree of inaccuracy. I defer to @Listy, and @HE117 and others about the practicality of sighting the PIAT, when battery mounted, against armour.
It makes a hit more sense to me, fwiw, than the canal-crossing idea.
 
Like I trust museums to get stuff right...
That museum with a nice collection of PzKpfwVI's has a blurb plate for the Jagdtiger that describes the damage from two 75mm rounds from a Sherman as being clearly visible on the left side of the vehicle.

It is clearly visible on the right side of the vehicle...
 
That's a good theory. An anti-armour mortar, with the natural dispersal of the rounds in flight allowing for a degree of inaccuracy. I defer to @Listy, and @HE117 and others about the practicality of sighting the PIAT, when battery mounted, against armour.
It makes a hit more sense to me, fwiw, than the canal-crossing idea.
Theories scare small children and academics.

But this is the least likely of the lot, that it's in a book means nowt. When I get home I shall post up a snippet from a book which will show what I'm talking about.

The bombardment weapon or mine clearing device seems much more likely, due to it being a Canadian engineer unit.
Let's also talk about how hard it is to hit a tank with IDF, with tube arty when you know the ballistics pretty well.
 
My simplistic thoughts were what you would actually use a hollow charge warhead against? Would that have more or less effect on a minefield then, say a 2" mortar? But I can see that as a shoot and scoot weapon it would be pretty much luck and just a bit suicidal. Be really interested to know more about this vehicle, being an ex carrier owner and bit of a PIAT collector.
 
So two of the big guardians of historical facts ballsed it up. Equally look at some of the YouTube videos that Bovy are putting out. They contain easy to errors, and this is with people like David Willey or David Fletcher giving the presentation. Just because a museum says it, doesn't mean it's any more credible than your mate down the pub. To stand a chance you need to find a SME on the topic.
You are of course factually correct, the problem is Willey and Fletcher are SMEs.
 
You are of course factually correct, the problem is Willey and Fletcher are SMEs.


They are SME's, but on all of the stuff they talk about? Take the recent Sherman video. I can barely tell a Sherman I from a Sherman V, ergo I wouldn't presume to give a presentation about them without some serious time in the archives. Yet people who I know who DO know Sherman's have said its riddled with errors.
 


They are SME's, but on all of the stuff they talk about? Take the recent Sherman video. I can barely tell a Sherman I from a Sherman V, ergo I wouldn't presume to give a presentation about them without some serious time in the archives. Yet people who I know who DO know Sherman's have said its riddled with errors.
Sherman's what? its whose?
 
Came across this on the TFB site with what looks to be a Carrier with a roof and a Stuart style turret mounted on it. Its at the El Alamein museum in Egypt, so I wonder if it was a WWII mod or a later Egyptian one that made it back into the museum. Came across a few carriers with different guns mounted but none roofed with a turret.
Found more pics of the same wagon here, with it listed as a carrier with a Stuart turret
Universal Carrier

El-Alamein Military Museum; Memories of WW2 Desert War - The Firearm Blog
From what I've read of their exhibits, it seems the El Alamein museum isn't too fussed about historical accuracy, but more about visual impact, like an Egyptian souk merchant.
 
Aside from 8mpg, what's the most expensive part of running one? Replacing the tyres?
The tyres on mine were fine, had a small lump or two of rubber missing, but never got any worse. You could also find the occasional good used wheel and tyre. I was more worried about track. High mileage track is only going to last so long before it becomes a problem, then where are you going to find another set? At least with my halftrack I've got two NOS sets that I have squirreled away.

Thinking about it, I suppose you could drill and repin the tracks to take out some of the wear, but that is a lot of work, and if you had to have the pins made, a lot of money.
 
Last edited:
The tyres on mine were fine, had a small lump or two of rubber missing, but never got any worse. You could also find the occasional good used wheel and tyre. I was more worried about track. High mileage track is only going to last so long before it becomes a problem, then where are you going to find another set? At least with my halftrack I've got two NOS sets that I have squirreled away.

Thinking about it, I suppose you could drill and repin the tracks to take out some of the wear, but that is a lot of work, and if you had to have the pins made, a lot of money.
I considered track wear but thought it wouldn't be too difficult to get new ones cast, either from an original supplier or using a good link to create a mould. That said, there's quite a few of them. Regarding pinning, wouldn't drilling and sleeving be a better way forward?

I thought tyres would be a bigger problem as there'd be the compound to match and, 70+ years on, the rubber of the originals must be suffering from embrittlement.
 
It would be very, very expensive to have track re cast then machined up. Both the track and the pins wear (and the sprockets). You could sleeve, but may be better to weld up and re drill, assuming the pins are serviceable. Not sure if anyone has had to do that yet as you can remove several links before the track becomes US, but it doesn't last forever. At least with my halftrack spare sets were available and might still be.

Never had a problem with either carrier or halftrack tires. If I broke/threw a track I suspect that they wouldn't take too kind to running on a road though.
 
The tyres on mine were fine, had a small lump or two of rubber missing, but never got any worse. You could also find the occasional good used wheel and tyre. I was more worried about track. High mileage track is only going to last so long before it becomes a problem, then where are you going to find another set? At least with my halftrack I've got two NOS sets that I have squirreled away.

Thinking about it, I suppose you could drill and repin the tracks to take out some of the wear, but that is a lot of work, and if you had to have the pins made, a lot of money.
theres a bloke in NZ casting and making carrier track, I cant remember his name, but hes a part of the NZ military vehicle collectors club.

Home - New Zealand Military Vehicle Club
 

Latest Threads

Top