The unimaginatively titled general cricket thread.

Bob Upndown

War Hero
Pretty much agree with you, but more so with the rugby, however I think the Indian cricketers have been treated very shabbily especially in Queensland.

And they rose above it all to deliver the series win. Testament to the character of the team that they delivered that win despite the brickbats being lobbed and devoid of Kohli who was supposed to be the only key to a win. Not so now.

Looking forward to the inevitable scapegoat enquiry in the Aus team, who’s going to be crying at the presser this time???

Can’t wait for the England series then the Ashes, 2021 is shaping up to be a good year at the crease.
 
And they rose above it all to deliver the series win. Testament to the character of the team that they delivered that win despite the brickbats being lobbed and devoid of Kohli who was supposed to be the only key to a win. Not so now.

Looking forward to the inevitable scapegoat enquiry in the Aus team, who’s going to be crying at the presser this time???

Can’t wait for the England series then the Ashes, 2021 is shaping up to be a good year at the crease.
Australian first class cricket is in a real mess thanks to T20. The first class Sheffield Shield is representative cricket; players are selected from their grade teams to represent their state. Very different from County Cricket with its professional squads. In the past it was pretty brutal; you got selected, performed or were dropped. When you were dropped, that was pretty much the end of your professional career, so there was no equivalent of the country trundler making a career of first class cricket.

With T20 and the Big Bash, players can stay professional for much longer, so the state Shield teams are now full of ageing nearly men who never quite made Test cricket. Thus bright, young talent struggles to get a first class game.

The other issue is the demise of the back yard. Listen to any great Aussie test cricketer and they talk about playing in their back yard (garden) when they were kids. Now, population growth, real estate inflation etc has built over back yards.

The conveyor belt of talent has stopped.
 

Scorcher68

Old-Salt
Mate of mine who played county 2 nd XI in his younger years played first grade club cricket out there and said that level club cricket in Australia was as at least as tough as county 2s . Wonder if that is still the case.
 

Bluenose2

Old-Salt
Mate of mine who played county 2 nd XI in his younger years played first grade club cricket out there and said that level club cricket in Australia was as at least as tough as county 2s . Wonder if that is still the case.
Cricket has always struck me as a sport where the gap between professional level and the one below it is enormous.

In the 90s, I occasionally stepped up from Hampshire league 2nds to the first team. We played against the occasional Aussie grade/state cricketer who was an overseas 'pro' (ours was Sri Lankan) for a league side.

The difference in technique and ability was an eye-opener. No doubt an English county pro would have appeared likewise, but it was like they were a different species, never mind a different level.

We were the first team to dismiss one chap that season, but only after he'd scored 130+ and that was his 5th ton on the bounce. We had 2 opening bowlers who probably hit high-70s/low-80s mph, and the lad in question just looked like he was facing toddlers in his back garden.
 
Mate of mine who played county 2 nd XI in his younger years played first grade club cricket out there and said that level club cricket in Australia was as at least as tough as county 2s . Wonder if that is still the case.
Grade cricket is now called Premier Cricket as part of a Cricket Australia initiative to standardise the brand across the States. It’s still highly competitive, but half the games between clubs are T20.

The problem is that the States don’t take risk on young players like they used to. Instead, they select from the ranks of cricketers making a living in T20.

BTW, this is not my original opinion; it’s Ricky Ponting’s analysis of why Australia isn’t producing batsmen.
 
Grade cricket is now called Premier Cricket as part of a Cricket Australia initiative to standardise the brand across the States. It’s still highly competitive, but half the games between clubs are T20.

The problem is that the States don’t take risk on young players like they used to. Instead, they select from the ranks of cricketers making a living in T20.

BTW, this is not my original opinion; it’s Ricky Ponting’s analysis of why Australia isn’t producing batsmen.
And what would he know about batting:)
 
Cricket has always struck me as a sport where the gap between professional level and the one below it is enormous.

In the 90s, I occasionally stepped up from Hampshire league 2nds to the first team. We played against the occasional Aussie grade/state cricketer who was an overseas 'pro' (ours was Sri Lankan) for a league side.

The difference in technique and ability was an eye-opener. No doubt an English county pro would have appeared likewise, but it was like they were a different species, never mind a different level.

We were the first team to dismiss one chap that season, but only after he'd scored 130+ and that was his 5th ton on the bounce. We had 2 opening bowlers who probably hit high-70s/low-80s mph, and the lad in question just looked like he was facing toddlers in his back garden.
I'm in awe of your prowess ( if not the Bluenose, moniker)
I'm assuming you would be sharing a dressing room with the great Malcolm Marshall during your career?

He Pro'd up here for a spell later on, our League champions drew his lot in a knockout Cup, much mirth was has teasing the mature opening batsmen, of the delights of learning to wear a helmet in the twilight of their dotage.
Come the night, the (gobby) skipper and no.3 bat exclaimed to one and all he could "easily pick" his outswingers from the induckers.

I knew what he meant, I could too.
However, we were sitting on the sightscreen 70 yards away, and MM was coming off three paces.
His last ball was of the dramatically marked full length run up, pure poetry, it came out of the back of his hand and turned square!
The night after, when they came back to knock the runs off, MM turned up, baseball mitt in hand, and spent all evening coaching, chatting to and encouraging every child that had turned up to nets.
He was still signing autographs in the dark.

We've been blessed in the Lancs. Leagues with many of the Greats....
None surpass MM.

( A certain Blond Kiwi opener, you can put in the same bracket as Sir Geoffrey however)

Back on thread, it's interesting the reading Indian Press' opinion of the calm and assured captaincy of Rahane, and his huge contribution to winning against the odds.
Imo Kohli's undoubted genius, masks a certain 'excitability' which isn't condusive to the teams' best interest.
Paine let himself down terribly, I doubt he'll get chance to redeem what was looking like a fine legacy.


( Bloody great innit?)
 

Bluenose2

Old-Salt
I'm in awe of your prowess ( if not the Bluenose, moniker)
I'm assuming you would be sharing a dressing room with the great Malcolm Marshall during your career?

He Pro'd up here for a spell later on, our League champions drew his lot in a knockout Cup, much mirth was has teasing the mature opening batsmen, of the delights of learning to wear a helmet in the twilight of their dotage.
Come the night, the (gobby) skipper and no.3 bat exclaimed to one and all he could "easily pick" his outswingers from the induckers.

I knew what he meant, I could too.
However, we were sitting on the sightscreen 70 yards away, and MM was coming off three paces.
His last ball was of the dramatically marked full length run up, pure poetry, it came out of the back of his hand and turned square!
The night after, when they came back to knock the runs off, MM turned up, baseball mitt in hand, and spent all evening coaching, chatting to and encouraging every child that had turned up to nets.
He was still signing autographs in the dark.

We've been blessed in the Lancs. Leagues with many of the Greats....
None surpass MM.

( A certain Blond Kiwi opener, you can put in the same bracket as Sir Geoffrey however)

Back on thread, it's interesting the reading Indian Press' opinion of the calm and assured captaincy of Rahane, and his huge contribution to winning against the odds.
Imo Kohli's undoubted genius, masks a certain 'excitability' which isn't condusive to the teams' best interest.
Paine let himself down terribly, I doubt he'll get chance to redeem what was looking like a fine legacy.


( Bloody great innit?)

Great story. Totally agree on Kohli too, although I did like his response to Chappel's comment about him being the 'most Australian' of opponents (i.e., you're so good, you remind us of us) by saying he represented New India. I think that passion and assertiveness holds as much appeal to his besotted fan base as his skills with the bat.

Mind you, have you noticed Indian broadcasters cut to him in the field before and after every ball? And then show a slow motion of him overacting? Drives me potty.

As for my skills, I had a pulse, could field a bit and was slightly less hungover than whichever first teamer had overslept and not turned up. I was generally ecstatic if I middled one and walked off without a broken bonce.
 
In a brilliant and well timed response to Australia’s very poor performance against India and losing at the GABA for the first time since 1998 to any team?, Cricket Australia has shoved its head even further up its own arse by making a woke political announcement that big bash games played on Australia Day will not be referred to as being played on Australia Day
 

Scorcher68

Old-Salt
Grade cricket is now called Premier Cricket as part of a Cricket Australia initiative to standardise the brand across the States. It’s still highly competitive, but half the games between clubs are T20.

The problem is that the States don’t take risk on young players like they used to. Instead, they select from the ranks of cricketers making a living in T20.

BTW, this is not my original opinion; it’s Ricky Ponting’s analysis of why Australia isn’t producing batsmen.


Seem to recall on the last two Ashes series over here both Alan Border and Steve Waugh were absolutely scathing in their criticism of the majority of Aussie batsmen's defensive technique against the seaming ball.
 
Seem to recall on the last two Ashes series over here both Alan Border and Steve Waugh were absolutely scathing in their criticism of the majority of Aussie batsmen's defensive technique against the seaming ball.
Ponting is very critical. The only Australian batsman with good technique is Marnus Labuschange. I think India worked out Smith and he didn’t have much of an answer. Here’s hoping Stuart Broad has been watching!
 
Seem to recall on the last two Ashes series over here both Alan Border and Steve Waugh were absolutely scathing in their criticism of the majority of Aussie batsmen's defensive technique against the seaming ball.
The 2019 Ashes had some of the worst batting I can remember, on either side. The sole exceptions were Smith, Labuschagne, Burns & Stokes.
 
Cricket has always struck me as a sport where the gap between professional level and the one below it is enormous.

In the 90s, I occasionally stepped up from Hampshire league 2nds to the first team. We played against the occasional Aussie grade/state cricketer who was an overseas 'pro' (ours was Sri Lankan) for a league side.

The difference in technique and ability was an eye-opener. No doubt an English county pro would have appeared likewise, but it was like they were a different species, never mind a different level.

We were the first team to dismiss one chap that season, but only after he'd scored 130+ and that was his 5th ton on the bounce. We had 2 opening bowlers who probably hit high-70s/low-80s mph, and the lad in question just looked like he was facing toddlers in his back garden.
I agree. I know some players who are almost too good at 1XI level at good clubs that just about scraped a couple of minor county games. To get to first class career, I think you've got to get picked up young and then grow in a county academy, otherwise you'll never break in. International is another massive jump beyond that.

And I agree that part of the problem is that playground cricket has all but died. This means that many talented players don't realise they have the talent until they take up the game as an adult, by which time they are too old to make the jump from club to county because they couldn't grow in an academy.
 
Jimmy Anderson is just extraordinary. Six wickets (so far) in the heat of Galle is an amazing feat, particularly when you take into account his age.
Oh Jimmy, Jimmy!
 
Yes, fantastic achievement. Albeit with the benefit of a bit of rest. In the short term, it may not be enough, especially if the lions get close to 400. Only a question of whether they can bowl England out twice.
 
Jimmy Anderson is just extraordinary. Six wickets (so far) in the heat of Galle is an amazing feat, particularly when you take into account his age.
Oh Jimmy, Jimmy!
Can't help wondering what the hell we'll do when he retires. I know there are lots of contenders for the opening bowler slot but the best, like Wood & Stone, get injured all the time.
 
Whilst overshadowed by Anderson, some fine batting by Root today. Given his average and age, he will almost certainly overtake Alastair Cook in terms of runs.. However, given his ODI pedigree I wonder if there's a case for him becoming England's greatest batsman...
 

Latest Threads

Top