The Ultimate High Ground: US Counterspace Strategy

#2
It's an interesting set of concepts - but I can't help feeling that it's a dangerous can of worms for the US to open. They rely on satellites more than anyone else, and so are more vulnerable than anyone else to the weaponisation of space. Basic ASATs were around in the 60s so lashing up something now is technically feasible for quite a few countries. It won't be as advanced as the US kit, but that's not an issue if all you want to do is break things.

Plus it also means that "allied" nations may not be for much longer. If the US blind a sat from country X, then country X blows up a US satellite - as that is all the capability they have - will the US start a war over it ? And I suspect that the US will feel the loss of their kit more than the opposition.
 
#3
http://www.space.com/news/050727_china_military.html
In recent years, some U.S. politicians and analysts have claimed that China's reported efforts to develop anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons pose a direct threat to U.S. space assets (and thus U.S. space dominance).[1] Chinese development of ASAT weapons could constitute a potential threat to U.S. military forces, especially if China developed and deployed a robust ASAT capability. However, reports of Chinese efforts to develop anti-satellite weapons need closer scrutiny and further analysis before reaching an informed judgment on the potential threat.
http://cns.miis.edu/pubs/week/020722.htm
A recently issued report by the U.S. Office of the Secretary of Defense has cast an eye on China’s growing space capability.
The annual report -- The Military Power of the People’s Republic of China 2005 – flatly claims that China is developing and intends to field anti-satellite (ASAT) systems.
http://www.fas.org/spp/guide/china/military/asat/index.html
The 1998 Report to Congress "Future Military Capabilities and Strategy of the People's Republic of China", states "China already may possess the capability to damage, under specific conditions, optical sensors on satellites that are very vulnerable to damage by lasers. However, given China’s current interest in laser technology, it is reasonable to assume that Beijing would develop a weapon that could destroy satellites in the future."
http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/space-weapons/issues/zhang-chinese-perspectives.htm
Thus, many Chinese argue that one real purpose for the Bush administration’s rush for GMD deployment could be to acquire an ASAT capability for its space control strategy.
 

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