The UK/European migrant problem

I'm off on a tangent here, so apologies

I'm no supporter of unfettered migration, as much as the next man, however when you experience migration at a face-to-face and personal level, it's a whole different ball game. Let me expand

A couple of years ago, my neighbour and friend, who's Moroccan born, was having a family party for his youngest son's birthday. He also invited friends and customers from his Coffee shop, also some acquaintances from his Mosque. One family that came were the Governments 500+ who were lifted for the Jordanian Refugee camps and offered asylum in the UK. Mum, dad and three young kids. They had been in the UK, just over a week and still wore the clothes they came over in, pretty threadbare and inappropriate for the climate.

The charity that housed them, has sorted out the basics, but a lot of detail of everyday life had not come their way yet.

They looked like frightened rabbits. They hardly spoke to anyone, even though half the hall were talking either Arabic or French (My mates extended family were mostly settled in Belgium). The kids were skinny and looked fairly malnourished. They spent the first few hours clasped to their mum and dad, looking at everyone like they would kill them. Eventually they got some (fantastic) food from the buffet that the family had brought, and ate it like it was their last. My kids tried to make conversation through my mate's brother, but they offered little. It can't have been cultural, as the place was packed with North African Arab's. It was translated to us by the dad, that he hadn't seen his kids smile in a month or so since leaving Syria, as what they had seen on the journey and before was pretty distressing.

Eventually after a few Moroccan Tea's, my mate got the Arabic music on and singing and dancing ensued. He had brought along his daughters Karaoke speaker set for a laugh. All was going well, and there appeared to be interest from the Syrian family. They gently tapped along to the music, then all of a sudden the eldest, around 10, asked for the mic and started singing. The dancing stopped and we all listening to this skinny little girl sing.
The more she sang, the more her manner changed, and eventually she started enjoying herself, broke into a smile and started to came out of her shell.

I've no idea what see was singing, but it seemed pretty upbeat, and everyone knew the chorus. It was one of those life changing moments (for her) and very emotional, (for all of us). When she finished she got a massive round of applause, which lifted her higher. You could see her family physically started to relax, and spent the rest of the afternoon and early evening chatting and making conversation.

I've no idea what they went through or how it affected them, but that moment seemed to change them, and touch everyone else who was their. Migration suddenly got very personal

For interest, the family are doing really well. The three kids are doing great at school. They look and act like kids now, and don't look like scared skeletons. The mum works at the local Primary School. The dad, after a year of depression as he struggled with the language & the culture change, plus trying to understand the ongoing issues in Syria, has finally created a small business at his home making ME food that he sells onto food shops and restaurants in Oxford.

Sorry if it all sounds a bit soppy/gay/boring shite, but I saw them yesterday and it reminded me to post this to remind people that migration is about real people, not just numbers
 
Sorry if it all sounds a bit soppy/gay/boring shite, but I saw them yesterday and it reminded me to post this to remind people that migration is about real people, not just numbers[/QUOTE]

Its great to hear about genuine refugees being welcomed and settling in to life here. It boils my blood that Sub Saharan African economic migrants are being imported in unchecked numbers. This policy is undermining available public services and on a human level, sympathy for families like those you describe.
 
I'm off on a tangent here, so apologies

I'm no supporter of unfettered migration, as much as the next man, however when you experience migration at a face-to-face and personal level, it's a whole different ball game. Let me expand

A couple of years ago, my neighbour and friend, who's Moroccan born, was having a family party for his youngest son's birthday. He also invited friends and customers from his Coffee shop, also some acquaintances from his Mosque. One family that came were the Governments 500+ who were lifted for the Jordanian Refugee camps and offered asylum in the UK. Mum, dad and three young kids. They had been in the UK, just over a week and still wore the clothes they came over in, pretty threadbare and inappropriate for the climate.

The charity that housed them, has sorted out the basics, but a lot of detail of everyday life had not come their way yet.

They looked like frightened rabbits. They hardly spoke to anyone, even though half the hall were talking either Arabic or French (My mates extended family were mostly settled in Belgium). The kids were skinny and looked fairly malnourished. They spent the first few hours clasped to their mum and dad, looking at everyone like they would kill them. Eventually they got some (fantastic) food from the buffet that the family had brought, and ate it like it was their last. My kids tried to make conversation through my mate's brother, but they offered little. It can't have been cultural, as the place was packed with North African Arab's. It was translated to us by the dad, that he hadn't seen his kids smile in a month or so since leaving Syria, as what they had seen on the journey and before was pretty distressing.

Eventually after a few Moroccan Tea's, my mate got the Arabic music on and singing and dancing ensued. He had brought along his daughters Karaoke speaker set for a laugh. All was going well, and there appeared to be interest from the Syrian family. They gently tapped along to the music, then all of a sudden the eldest, around 10, asked for the mic and started singing. The dancing stopped and we all listening to this skinny little girl sing.
The more she sang, the more her manner changed, and eventually she started enjoying herself, broke into a smile and started to came out of her shell.

I've no idea what see was singing, but it seemed pretty upbeat, and everyone knew the chorus. It was one of those life changing moments (for her) and very emotional, (for all of us). When she finished she got a massive round of applause, which lifted her higher. You could see her family physically started to relax, and spent the rest of the afternoon and early evening chatting and making conversation.

I've no idea what they went through or how it affected them, but that moment seemed to change them, and touch everyone else who was their. Migration suddenly got very personal

For interest, the family are doing really well. The three kids are doing great at school. They look and act like kids now, and don't look like scared skeletons. The mum works at the local Primary School. The dad, after a year of depression as he struggled with the language & the culture change, plus trying to understand the ongoing issues in Syria, has finally created a small business at his home making ME food that he sells onto food shops and restaurants in Oxford.

Sorry if it all sounds a bit soppy/gay/boring shite, but I saw them yesterday and it reminded me to post this to remind people that migration is about real people, not just numbers
Well done for posting this.

Immigration is not a black and white issue. As you say on a personal level, things are vastly different. It's good these people had a good time, and it sounds like they will integrate and contribute to society.

However there is a finite limit to the number of people that can be settled in this country, especially when the immigrant community are over-represented in the criminal statistics both here and in other European countries.

Difficult to know where to strike the balance.

One thing is for sure, those who are prepared to work and integrate into society are welcome, but those who come here to rip off the benefits system and indulge in criminal activity and have no interest in integrating are not welcome, and indeed should be shown the door.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Sorry if it all sounds a bit soppy/gay/boring shite, but I saw them yesterday and it reminded me to post this to remind people that migration is about real people, not just numbers



Genuinely, I am touched by the experiences of our Sapper friend, and I am glad to hear that the family in question are moving on from no doubt hugely traumatic experience.

However, comma.............

The UK is utterly skint and we are adding to that debt by c£70bn pa. Now, whilst it seems callous to define people in terms of cost and other financial measurements, it has to happen; if we simply go by the '.....ickle wickle baybees...' emotional school of decision making, we're up s**t creek. Simply put, refugees and economic migrants cost.

I find it rather counter-intuitive that people either explicitly or passively endorse the concept of the generation who lived through total war and brought about the defeat of the 20th century's greatest evils (Nazism and Communism) dying of cold in sub-standard housing because we cannot afford to look after them in their old age, yet we are open house to any chancer who can get off the back of a lorry in Dover and spit the word "Asylum".

Maybe that's an overly simplistic outlook, but I don't think so.
 
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[Genuinely, I am touched by the experiences of our Sapper friend, and I am glad to hear that the family in question are moving on from no doubt hugely traumatic experience............
..................................................................
........................Maybe that's an overly simplistic outlook, but I don't think so.[/QUOTE]

100% agree, if we are to take a step back at look at the bigger picture in a purely financial perspective then "safe havens" are the way forward. They have been proposed and quickly forgotten about in recent years.
To create an area where the migrant / refugee / asylum seeker population can be, health screened, interviewed , given tests to determine their true age and assess if they have any skills that could be used is a no brainer.
To apply this screening process, at a safe distance , at a lower cost to tax payers is the obvious solution. Unfortunately we are up against a coalition of Soros , a host of NGOs and virtue signaling politicians with no regard for their public.
 
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Original article: Die welt
Armed migrant gang refused entry to a club.

Sent from my SM-A500FU using Tapatalk
 
Original article: Die welt
Armed migrant gang refused entry to a club.

Sent from my SM-A500FU using Tapatalk
Dortmund had a problem with Turks but it was the British squaddie that kept them in order, except when ambushed on Straße essen
 
I'm off on a tangent here, so apologies

I'm no supporter of unfettered migration, as much as the next man, however when you experience migration at a face-to-face and personal level, it's a whole different ball game. Let me expand

A couple of years ago, my neighbour and friend, who's Moroccan born, was having a family party for his youngest son's birthday. He also invited friends and customers from his Coffee shop, also some acquaintances from his Mosque. One family that came were the Governments 500+ who were lifted for the Jordanian Refugee camps and offered asylum in the UK. Mum, dad and three young kids. They had been in the UK, just over a week and still wore the clothes they came over in, pretty threadbare and inappropriate for the climate.

The charity that housed them, has sorted out the basics, but a lot of detail of everyday life had not come their way yet.

They looked like frightened rabbits. They hardly spoke to anyone, even though half the hall were talking either Arabic or French (My mates extended family were mostly settled in Belgium). The kids were skinny and looked fairly malnourished. They spent the first few hours clasped to their mum and dad, looking at everyone like they would kill them. Eventually they got some (fantastic) food from the buffet that the family had brought, and ate it like it was their last. My kids tried to make conversation through my mate's brother, but they offered little. It can't have been cultural, as the place was packed with North African Arab's. It was translated to us by the dad, that he hadn't seen his kids smile in a month or so since leaving Syria, as what they had seen on the journey and before was pretty distressing.

Eventually after a few Moroccan Tea's, my mate got the Arabic music on and singing and dancing ensued. He had brought along his daughters Karaoke speaker set for a laugh. All was going well, and there appeared to be interest from the Syrian family. They gently tapped along to the music, then all of a sudden the eldest, around 10, asked for the mic and started singing. The dancing stopped and we all listening to this skinny little girl sing.
The more she sang, the more her manner changed, and eventually she started enjoying herself, broke into a smile and started to came out of her shell.

I've no idea what see was singing, but it seemed pretty upbeat, and everyone knew the chorus. It was one of those life changing moments (for her) and very emotional, (for all of us). When she finished she got a massive round of applause, which lifted her higher. You could see her family physically started to relax, and spent the rest of the afternoon and early evening chatting and making conversation.

I've no idea what they went through or how it affected them, but that moment seemed to change them, and touch everyone else who was their. Migration suddenly got very personal

For interest, the family are doing really well. The three kids are doing great at school. They look and act like kids now, and don't look like scared skeletons. The mum works at the local Primary School. The dad, after a year of depression as he struggled with the language & the culture change, plus trying to understand the ongoing issues in Syria, has finally created a small business at his home making ME food that he sells onto food shops and restaurants in Oxford.

Sorry if it all sounds a bit soppy/gay/boring shite, but I saw them yesterday and it reminded me to post this to remind people that migration is about real people, not just numbers
Wonderful.
Except that the solution is to improve their country, not import them into UK / Europe.

PS: The solution to the NGO ship problem is Mk48 torpedoes.
 

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