The Trump Presidency...

There is no constitutional right to free speech in ANY workplace...
Really?

Limited Forums
A limited forum is a type of a designated public forum. Here, the government limits access to a designated public forum to certain classes or types of speech. In Good News Club v. Milford Central School, 533 U.S. 98 (2001), the Supreme Court held that in a “limited forum,” the government may discriminate against classes of speakers or types of speech. However, the government is still prohibited from engaging in viewpoint discrimination. For example, the government may limit access to public school meeting rooms by only allowing speakers conducting school-related activities. It may not, however, exclude speakers from a religious group simply because they intend to express religious views.

Nonpublic Forums
Nonpublic forums are forums for public speech that are neither traditional public forums nor designated public forums. According to the Supreme Court in Minnesota Voters Alliance v. Mansky, 585 U.S. __ (2018), in a nonpublic forum, the Government may restrict contents of a speech, as long as the restriction is reasonable and the restriction does not discriminate based on speakers’ viewpoints. Examples of nonpublic forums include airport terminals, a public school’s internal mail system, and a polling place.

Finally, some public property is not a forum at all, and thus is not subject to this forum analysis. For example, public television broadcasters’ are not subject to forum analysis when they decide what shows to air.

 
Really?

Limited Forums
A limited forum is a type of a designated public forum. Here, the government limits access to a designated public forum to certain classes or types of speech. In Good News Club v. Milford Central School, 533 U.S. 98 (2001), the Supreme Court held that in a “limited forum,” the government may discriminate against classes of speakers or types of speech. However, the government is still prohibited from engaging in viewpoint discrimination. For example, the government may limit access to public school meeting rooms by only allowing speakers conducting school-related activities. It may not, however, exclude speakers from a religious group simply because they intend to express religious views.

Nonpublic Forums
Nonpublic forums are forums for public speech that are neither traditional public forums nor designated public forums. According to the Supreme Court in Minnesota Voters Alliance v. Mansky, 585 U.S. __ (2018), in a nonpublic forum, the Government may restrict contents of a speech, as long as the restriction is reasonable and the restriction does not discriminate based on speakers’ viewpoints. Examples of nonpublic forums include airport terminals, a public school’s internal mail system, and a polling place.

Finally, some public property is not a forum at all, and thus is not subject to this forum analysis. For example, public television broadcasters’ are not subject to forum analysis when they decide what shows to air.

WHat does that have to do with Federal employees having the right to say anything they want?
 
WHat does that have to do with Federal employees having the right to say anything they want?
Have a read of the full link. If you can't figure it out, I can't tell you. If you believe that being a federal employee means you waive the rights under the US Constitution, God help you all.
 
Public forum vs Workplace.
So what's a Nonpublic Forum then? 'Nonpublic forums are forums for public speech that are neither traditional public forums nor designated public forums.'
 
COMMENTARY & OPINION

Jon Hyman is a partner at Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis in Cleveland.

An opinion, from a lawyer. Is that the best you can do?
You have got to be joking... A vague link to public vs non public forums makes you more accurate than an actual American lawyer, than specializes in the subject matter. Don't be a spacker - Generally there is no freedom of speech in a workplace ( unless its union talk/workplace conditions etc), and trying to usurp the power of the Most powerful LE officer of the land is a bad idea, if you want to keep your job.

 
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You have got to be joking... A vague link to public vs non public forums makes you more accurate than an actual American lawyer, than specializes in the subject matter. Don't be a spacker - Generally there is no freedom of speech in a workplace ( unless its union talk/workplace conditions etc), and trying to usurp the power of the Most powerful LE officer of the land is a bad idea, if you want to keep your job.

Well, it was good enough for your fellow traveller, who's just been dull enough to give your post a like for criticising Cornell as a source, to use to justify his own position - https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/the-trump-presidency.261622/page-1707#post-9855086
 
Well, it was good enough for your fellow traveller, who's just been dull enough to give your post a like for criticising Cornell as a source, to use to justify his own position - https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/the-trump-presidency.261622/page-1707#post-9855086
Skipped, you folks make a big to do about the Nazification of America for no reason. You don't get to thwart the Commander in Chief when you are employed by him. Outside of the office you can do as you like, but you can't use your position in office to hinder him. You folks think the Brown shirts are out in force.....

The EPA is an example of an agency that still thinks the Paris Climate accords are in effect and the US is beholden to them. So if you are still trying to thwart Trumps objectives, and openly do so you not doing your job. You don't get to be a Liberal lobbyist as a GS-15....

Senior Executive Service
 
"SOCALSapper, post: 9855633, member: 98256"]
Well so far the only evidence we have seen is FBI agents/officials lying, making evidence up, deleting said evidence and making plans to stop the Presidents agenda.
Where and when did they try and stop Trump's agenda?

Easy Easy solution...You work for the Government and feel so strongly about opposing the President that you will try to undermine him - Quit.
I can understand that, which I presume you would apply to all civil servants of whatever political persuasion.

I should think though there could be exceptions. As an extreme example, say there was a civil servant in Germany during the 30s and WW2. Should they quit, or try and do something against the Nazi regime?
 
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mercurydancer

LE
Book Reviewer
Pot calling Kettle...The US has been rather busy on the trading front. I imagine a mini deal with the EU by the middle of March. I don’t see anything with India yet.
Exporting toilets may be a potential market.
 

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