The Trump Presidency...

Another former Trump aide has been caught up in a scandal - Jason Miller has been accused of secretly giving a woman an abortion pill hidden in a smoothie after getting her pregnant during an affair.
It's the gentlemanly thing to do after the rohypnol in the smoothie that cause the problem in the first place.
 
Besides I do get our version of NHS for life
No you don't, the US doesn't have a version of the NHS.

What you get, as a state employee, is the equivalent of the Soviet Union's inside track for nomenklatura denied to the proletariat.
 
Well, Melania's service has earned her family citizenship I suppose.

- The Washington Post

I'd suggest it was hypocrisy, but then I realised they were all white. So that's OK then. Not rapey Mexicans, African sh*thole dwellers, or (G-d forbid) Muslims.

Melanie, what are you....?


(It was the tinny rendition of the Russian national anthem that made me laugh the most).
 
I reckon it would be called the VA Health care system......
If it isn't available to all, free at the point of need, then it's not like our NHS in any way.
 
Minus the taxes you pay into the system. Ain’t nothing free brother. Besides I do get our version of NHS for life, and I still pay for private health care. Sadly I do my best to avoid doctors and the health care industry in general.
Well your “version of the NHS” must be pretty shit then Jonesy.

And “health care industry” is a pretty damning indictment. But hey, out of the mouths of babes and sucklings.
 
Another former Trump aide has been caught up in a scandal - Jason Miller has been accused of secretly giving a woman an abortion pill hidden in a smoothie after getting her pregnant during an affair.
They got the Christian Evangelical vote because of their pro life and pro family stance, I'm thinking of a word that begins with H.
 
What a shame - no is listening to Donny Douchebag - another case of one of the idiots policy's - driving up prices and costing us all money.

BUSINESS NEWS
SEPTEMBER 23, 2018 / 6:41 AM / UPDATED AN HOUR AGO
OPEC, Russia rebuff Trump's call for immediate boost to oil output.

Rania El Gamal, Ahmad Ghaddar, Olesya Astakhova

ALGIERS (Reuters) - OPEC’s leader Saudi Arabia and its biggest oil-producer ally outside the group, Russia, ruled out on Sunday any immediate, additional increase in crude output, effectively rebuffing U.S. President Donald Trump’s calls for action to cool the market.

“I do not influence prices,” Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih told reporters as OPEC and non-OPEC energy ministers gathered in Algiers for a meeting that ended with no formal recommendation for any additional supply boost.

Benchmark Brent oil LCOc1 reached $80 a barrel this month, prompting Trump to reiterate on Thursday his demand that the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries lower prices.

The price rally mainly stemmed from a decline in oil exports from OPEC member Iran due to fresh U.S. sanctions.

“We protect the countries of the Middle East, they would not be safe for very long without us, and yet they continue to push for higher and higher oil prices! We will remember. The OPEC monopoly must get prices down now!” Trump wrote on Twitter.

Falih said Saudi Arabia had spare capacity to increase oil output but no such move was needed at the moment.


“My information is that the markets are adequately supplied. I don’t know of any refiner in the world who is looking for oil and is not able to get it,” Falih said.

However, he signaled Saudi Arabia stood ready to increase supply if Iran’s output fell: “Whatever takes place between now and the end of the year in terms of supply changes will be addressed.”

Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak said no immediate output increase was necessary, although he believed a trade war between China and the United States as well as U.S. sanctions on Iran were creating new challenges for oil markets.

Oman’s Oil Minister Mohammed bin Hamad Al-Rumhy and Kuwaiti counterpart Bakhit al-Rashidi told reporters after Sunday’s talks that producers had agreed they needed to focus on reaching 100 percent compliance with production cuts agreed in June.

That effectively means compensating for falling Iranian production. Al-Rumhy said the exact mechanism for doing so had not been discussed.

The statement from Trump, meanwhile, was not his first criticism of OPEC.

Higher gasoline prices for U.S. consumers could create a political headache for Republican Trump before mid-term congressional elections in November.


Iran, OPEC’s third-largest producer, has accused Trump of orchestrating the oil price rally by imposing sanctions on Tehran and accused its regional arch-rival Saudi Arabia of bowing to U.S. pressure.

On Sunday, Iranian Oil Minister Bijan Zanganeh said Trump’s tweet “was the biggest insult to Washington’s allies in the Middle East”.

OPEC OUTPUT FALLS AGAIN
Seeking to reverse a downturn in oil prices that began in 2014, OPEC, Russia and other allies decided in late 2016 to reduce supply by some 1.8 million barrels per day (bpd).

In June this year, however, after months of cutting by more than their pact had called for, largely due to involuntary reductions from Venezuela and other producers, they agreed to boost output by returning to 100 percent compliance.

That equates to an increase of about 1 million bpd, but latest data show they are some way from achieving that target.

In August, OPEC and its allies cut production by 600,000 bpd more than their pact required, mainly as a result of falling output in Iran as customers in Europe and Asia reduced purchases ahead of the U.S. sanctions deadline.


Iran told OPEC its production had been steady in August at 3.8 million bpd. OPEC’s own estimates, according to its secondary sources such as researchers and ship-trackers, put Iranian output at 3.58 million bpd.

Falih said returning to 100 percent compliance was the main objective and should be achieved in the next two-three months.

Although he refrained from specifying how that could be done, Saudi Arabia is the only oil producer with significant spare capacity.

“We have the consensus that we need to offset reductions and achieve 100 percent compliance, which means we can produce significantly more than we are producing today if there is demand,” Falih said.

“The biggest issue is not with the producing countries, it’s with the refiners, it’s with the demand. We in Saudi Arabia have not seen demand for any additional barrel that we did not produce.”

OPEC also decided on Sunday to adjust the dates of its next meeting to Dec. 6-7 from the earlier-agreed Dec. 3.

The joint OPEC/non-OPEC ministerial monitoring committee will next meet on Nov. 11 in Abu Dhabi.
 
What the Muller investigation has found to date:

Robert Mueller’s special counsel has resulted in dozens of indictments and subsequent charges, which many casual observers on the Left seem to view as confirmation that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Witch hunts (even of the literal nature) always find some “guilty” individuals, though a common theme is that their guilt has nothing to do with the original goal of the hunt. That’s on full display in Mueller’s special counsel.
When Rod Rosenstein authorized Mueller’s special counsel after the firing of James Comey, it authorized Mueller to investigate “any links links and/or coordination bet ween the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump; and (ii) any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation; and (iii) any other matters within the scope of 28 C.F.R. § 600.4(a).”
After reviewing those charges, it’s clear that no evidence of “collusion” has been uncovered.
George Papadopoulos.
First charged: October 3, 2017.
Charges: One count of making false statements to the FBI.
Specifics: Made misleading statements to the FBI about his interactions with “an overseas professor” (Joseph Mifsud) who had alleged ties to the Russian government. Mifsud has donated to the Clinton Foundation in the past. No charges relating to actual Russian collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.
Rick Gates and Paul Manafort
First charged: October 27, 2017, then February 22, 2018.
Charges: Manafort – Found guilty of 8 counts: five tax fraud charges, one charge of hiding foreign bank accounts and two counts of bank fraud. Gates – 2 counts: conspiracy against the United States and false statements.
Specifics: All regarding tax evasion and money laundering. Zero charges are related to collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and the Russian government.
Michael Flynn
First charged: November 30, 2017.
Charges: One count of making false statements to the FBI. Flynn allegedly lied during an interview with two agents.
Specifics: As James Comey confirmed, neither of the FBI agents that Flynn allegedly lied to thought that Flynn was being untruthful. Flynn spoke to a Russian ambassador following the 2016 election, which is standard given Flynn’s former position. Flynn was quizzed on the contents of his conversation with the ambassador, none of which were criminal. The FBI had known this because they surveilled Flynn’s call and knew its exact contents before testing Flynn on how well he could recall it.
Richard Pinedo
First charged: February 2, 2018.
Charges: One count of identity theft.
Specifics: Pinedo operated the website Auction Essistance, which brokered bank account numbers to allow peopl ebanned from eBay and PayPal (and similar websites) to return to those websites under a different identity. Pinedo transferred, possessed and used the identities of other people in connection with unlawful activity, according to a statement of the offense. I’m not sure how this could have less to do with Russian collusion.
Alex van der Zwaan
First charged: February 2, 2018.
Charges: Lying to the FBI and Special Counsel about his interactions with Rick Gates and Konstantin Kilimnik (a Ukrainian associate of Manafort).
Specifics: None relating to Russian collusion with the Trump campaign.
Dzheykhun Aslanov, Gleb Vasilchenko, Internet Research Agency LLC, Irina Kaverzina Vladimir Venkov, Anna Bogacheva Maria Bovda Robert Bovda Mikhail Burchik Mikhail Bystrov Aleksandra Krylova Vadim Podkopaev Sergey Polozov Yevgeny Prigozhin Concord Catering, and Concord Management and Consulting LLC
First charged: February 16, 2018
Charges: Multiple charges of conspiracy to defraud the United States and aggravated identity theft. Conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud.
Specifics: Mueller alleges that the Russians indicted “communicated with unwitting individuals associated with the Trump campaign,” with the key word being “unwitting,” as there’s no evidence that the Trump campaign members knew. More specifically, their crimes include “making expenditures in connection with the 2016 U.S. presidential election without proper regulatory disclosure; failing to register as foreign agents carrying out political activities within the United States; and obtaining visas through false and fraudulent statements.”
While they did try to interfere with the U.S. election, there is no evidence of collusion.
Konstantin Kilimnik
First charged: June 8, 2018
Charges: Two counts: obstruction of justice and conspiracy to obstruct justice.
Specifics: Communicated with Rick Gates and Paul Manafort (who he’d known since 2005), and aided them in laundering money. “Russia” is mentioned in his indictment only when referencing to the country as a location.
Boris Antonov, Dmitriy Badin, Nikolay Kozachek, Aleksey Lukashev, Artem Malyshev, Sergey Morgachev, Viktor Netyksho, Aleksey Potemkin, Ivan Yermakov, Pavel Yershov, Aleksandr Osadchuk, and Anatoliy Kovalev
First charged: August 31, 2018.
Charges: Multiple charges of conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States, aggravated identity theft, and conspiracy to launder money.
Specifics: Attempted interference with U.S. election, but not through collusion with the Trump campaign. Also money laundering and identity theft.
W. Samuel Patten
First charged: August 31, 2018
Charges: Violating the Foreign Agents Registration Act
Specifics: Patten failed to register as a foreign agent with the Justice Department when he represented the Ukrainian political party “Opposition Bloc” from 2014 through 2018. He also admitted to laundering a $50,000 donation from Kilmnik to the Trump inauguration committee (there is no evidence to suggest anyone associated with the Trump campaign knew anything of this).
In Conclusion
Mueller has burned no shortage of witches at the stake with his investigation – but we still have yet to see a single charge of witchcraft.
 
Nope, no hint of an attempt to twist the facts to suit the Orange Agenda there....... 2/10

still , attribution would have been nice....... uncredited cut 'n' paste damages your credibility darling

THE LIST: Not a Single Special Counsel Indictment Mentions Russian Collusion

Dan Bongino - Wikipedia

Short version? Rabid Trumpeter tries to defend Trump, fails shocker

From the Wiki (see? not hard to credit source)

Political views
Bongino is a member of Groundswell, a coalition of conservative and libertarian activists fighting to advance conservative causes, according to public documents.[11]

Bongino opposes the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly referred to as Obamacare) and penned an editorial against it.[12]

Bongino has downplayed the Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections investigation, calling it a "total scam."[13] In May 2018, Bongino was quoted by President Donald Trump in one of his tweets, as Bongino attacked former CIA Director John Brennan. Bongino was quoted as saying Brennan "has disgraced the entire Intelligence Community. He is the one man who is largely responsible for the destruction of American’s faith in the Intelligence Community and in some people at the........top of the FBI."[14] Bongino was also quoted as alleging that Brennan was "worried about staying out of jail."[14]

In May 2018 after Republican Congressman Trey Gowdy and some conservative legal experts refuted Trump's claims that the FBI had spied on his 2016 presidential campaign, Bongino attacked Gowdy, saying that he had been "fooled" by the Department of Justice.[15]
 
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What the Muller investigation has found to date:

Robert Mueller’s special counsel has resulted in dozens of indictments and subsequent charges, which many casual observers on the Left seem to view as confirmation that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Witch hunts (even of the literal nature) always find some “guilty” individuals, though a common theme is that their guilt has nothing to do with the original goal of the hunt. That’s on full display in Mueller’s special counsel.
When Rod Rosenstein authorized Mueller’s special counsel after the firing of James Comey, it authorized Mueller to investigate “any links links and/or coordination bet ween the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump; and (ii) any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation; and (iii) any other matters within the scope of 28 C.F.R. § 600.4(a).”
After reviewing those charges, it’s clear that no evidence of “collusion” has been uncovered.
George Papadopoulos.
First charged: October 3, 2017.
Charges: One count of making false statements to the FBI.
Specifics: Made misleading statements to the FBI about his interactions with “an overseas professor” (Joseph Mifsud) who had alleged ties to the Russian government. Mifsud has donated to the Clinton Foundation in the past. No charges relating to actual Russian collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.
Rick Gates and Paul Manafort
First charged: October 27, 2017, then February 22, 2018.
Charges: Manafort – Found guilty of 8 counts: five tax fraud charges, one charge of hiding foreign bank accounts and two counts of bank fraud. Gates – 2 counts: conspiracy against the United States and false statements.
Specifics: All regarding tax evasion and money laundering. Zero charges are related to collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and the Russian government.
Michael Flynn
First charged: November 30, 2017.
Charges: One count of making false statements to the FBI. Flynn allegedly lied during an interview with two agents.
Specifics: As James Comey confirmed, neither of the FBI agents that Flynn allegedly lied to thought that Flynn was being untruthful. Flynn spoke to a Russian ambassador following the 2016 election, which is standard given Flynn’s former position. Flynn was quizzed on the contents of his conversation with the ambassador, none of which were criminal. The FBI had known this because they surveilled Flynn’s call and knew its exact contents before testing Flynn on how well he could recall it.
Richard Pinedo
First charged: February 2, 2018.
Charges: One count of identity theft.
Specifics: Pinedo operated the website Auction Essistance, which brokered bank account numbers to allow peopl ebanned from eBay and PayPal (and similar websites) to return to those websites under a different identity. Pinedo transferred, possessed and used the identities of other people in connection with unlawful activity, according to a statement of the offense. I’m not sure how this could have less to do with Russian collusion.
Alex van der Zwaan
First charged: February 2, 2018.
Charges: Lying to the FBI and Special Counsel about his interactions with Rick Gates and Konstantin Kilimnik (a Ukrainian associate of Manafort).
Specifics: None relating to Russian collusion with the Trump campaign.
Dzheykhun Aslanov, Gleb Vasilchenko, Internet Research Agency LLC, Irina Kaverzina Vladimir Venkov, Anna Bogacheva Maria Bovda Robert Bovda Mikhail Burchik Mikhail Bystrov Aleksandra Krylova Vadim Podkopaev Sergey Polozov Yevgeny Prigozhin Concord Catering, and Concord Management and Consulting LLC
First charged: February 16, 2018
Charges: Multiple charges of conspiracy to defraud the United States and aggravated identity theft. Conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud.
Specifics: Mueller alleges that the Russians indicted “communicated with unwitting individuals associated with the Trump campaign,” with the key word being “unwitting,” as there’s no evidence that the Trump campaign members knew. More specifically, their crimes include “making expenditures in connection with the 2016 U.S. presidential election without proper regulatory disclosure; failing to register as foreign agents carrying out political activities within the United States; and obtaining visas through false and fraudulent statements.”
While they did try to interfere with the U.S. election, there is no evidence of collusion.
Konstantin Kilimnik
First charged: June 8, 2018
Charges: Two counts: obstruction of justice and conspiracy to obstruct justice.
Specifics: Communicated with Rick Gates and Paul Manafort (who he’d known since 2005), and aided them in laundering money. “Russia” is mentioned in his indictment only when referencing to the country as a location.
Boris Antonov, Dmitriy Badin, Nikolay Kozachek, Aleksey Lukashev, Artem Malyshev, Sergey Morgachev, Viktor Netyksho, Aleksey Potemkin, Ivan Yermakov, Pavel Yershov, Aleksandr Osadchuk, and Anatoliy Kovalev
First charged: August 31, 2018.
Charges: Multiple charges of conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States, aggravated identity theft, and conspiracy to launder money.
Specifics: Attempted interference with U.S. election, but not through collusion with the Trump campaign. Also money laundering and identity theft.
W. Samuel Patten
First charged: August 31, 2018
Charges: Violating the Foreign Agents Registration Act
Specifics: Patten failed to register as a foreign agent with the Justice Department when he represented the Ukrainian political party “Opposition Bloc” from 2014 through 2018. He also admitted to laundering a $50,000 donation from Kilmnik to the Trump inauguration committee (there is no evidence to suggest anyone associated with the Trump campaign knew anything of this).
In Conclusion
Mueller has burned no shortage of witches at the stake with his investigation – but we still have yet to see a single charge of witchcraft.
Bit of a concurrent theme though.
Lying to the Feds
Fraud
Money laundering
Russian mob connections

You might almost think that the Trump campaign was just the American arm of a Russian Organised Crime network, plugged into the Kremlin.

Collusion, perhaps. Criminal conspiracy, certainly.
Treason?
Probably.
 
You might almost think that the Trump campaign was just the American arm of a Russian Organised Crime network, plugged into the Kremlin.
It is odd. I mean Trump seems to like forcing out people who are either experts on Russian organised crime or foreign counter-intelligence. For example,

Bruce Ohr Fought Russian Organized Crime. Now He’s a Target of Trump.

But Trump does know more than the military about DAESH.


I suppose he knows more than the intelligence community as well.

How's it looking from your perspective, Vlad?



Thought so.
 
If it isn't available to all, free at the point of need, then it's not like our NHS in any way.
It's swings and roundabouts when comparing the NHS to insurance based health systems as used in America.

I don't know whether @LJONESY has health insurance. If he does, he will get whatever treatment he needs. Unlike the NHS, American insurance companies can't refuse to treat you because it would be too expensive. On the other hand, if Jonesy does not have health insurance, he could well be stuffed if he has a minor or chronic ailment that charity hospitals, or the VA if he is a veteran, wont treat.

When my wife was ill, she was sent to see a NHS doctor who is the leading expert in the country in her illness. Even well insured Americans don't have access to eminent doctors. Here, you could be homeless and still have Sir Magdi Yacoub, world leading cardiologist, performing your heart surgery.

On the other hand, the NHS regularly kills people due to trivial reasons like dirty hospitals, drug rationing, political interference in funding and even starvation as happened in Stafford Hospital. As a Yank posting on here pointed out, that doesn't happen in America because 1) The company that owned the hospital would be sued into bankruptcy and 2) The individuals responsible, from nurses to the CEO of the company would be in prison, many for the rest of their lives. I don't think there was a single prosecution after the Staffordshire disaster.

There's no clear winner in a comparison between US and UK health systems. Each has advantages and disadvantages. The French system is often viewed as the best in the world. It is a mixture of free service with insurance and some co-payments.
 

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