The tragic loss of gardens

4(T)

LE
I was thinking about putting down a layer of chuckies in the basement to try and lock some of the moisture in without making it a tight seal. There's no damp etc in the building, but it's moist in the basement. Some old wood on the ground left by the previous was damp rotted through.

Fucked if I know what to do about it. No doubt whatever I do will end in an explosion.


A lot of Edwardian/Victorian houses have "wet" cellars. My old place even had a soakaway drain in the centre of the cellar floor. In very wet weather, the cellar would eventually flood a few inches. The ground floor of the building was bone dry though, as were the joists over the cellar. Air bricks kept everything properly ventilated. They built things properly in them days...
 

MrBane

LE
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A lot of Edwardian/Victorian houses have "wet" cellars. My old place even had a soakaway drain in the centre of the cellar floor. In very wet weather, the cellar would eventually flood a few inches. The ground floor of the building was bone dry though, as were the joists over the cellar. Air bricks kept everything properly ventilated. They built things properly in them days...

I'll agree there. Whilst I was somewhat concerned by the amount of moisture in the basement, having ripped the house back to shell for various conversion works, there is not a single fault, issue or problem with any part of the house other than what I have so far fucked up myself.

I feel sorry for the people buying a Cala four bedroom shoebox for £700k on an old bus depot and wondering why they're getting flooded out every year.
 
My basement is concrete with a sump well in the lowest corner, the water comes from perforated drain tile around the outside of the foundation. Rather than water building pressure on the footings and causing damage, it goes into the sump well inside then pumped out 500 m away. In 2008 the power went out during the night and the pumps didn't switch on, the hydraulic pressure from the water under the floor shifted the entire house and was spouting mini geysers out of any crack it could find. I installed a power outage alarm as well disposable water alarms that screech if the floor gets wet, not sure which was worse, the damage costs or sheer aggravation.

Our last house before we moved here had a crawl space with a pump and the pump sat in a small well that gathered water. Laying in bed I asked herself if she could hear water dripping. Open up the crawl space and there was about two feet of freezing water down there.

What had happened was the the ballcock arm had got stuck on the side of the well and the pump couldn't click on to empty the well. Wading through two feet of freezing water and then have to kneel to sort out the pump and stop it moving was such joy on Christmas Eve.
 
Our last house before we moved here had a crawl space with a pump and the pump sat in a small well that gathered water. Laying in bed I asked herself if she could hear water dripping. Open up the crawl space and there was about two feet of freezing water down there.

What had happened was the the ballcock arm had got stuck on the side of the well and the pump couldn't click on to empty the well. Wading through two feet of freezing water and then have to kneel to sort out the pump and stop it moving was such joy on Christmas Eve.
That's exactly why l have a third pump that kicks on if water gets to within an inch of the top of the well. If the floats hang up on the lower ones the top will kick in as it's a column type with nothing in the path of the gravity activated float.
 

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