The tragic loss of gardens

30 years ago we had the two car families. The mums would get themselves a car, needing two spaces.
Now we have 3- 4 cars in a family ( and sometimes a work van) as the two grown up kids live at home and each own a car.
Hence why people’s gardens are dug up and turned into car parks.
Genuinely quite sad.
Is it sad though? Or is it simply another of the many changes that have happened to domestic life over the previous three centuries, and overall of little consequence?

The quaint mock Tudor homes in leafy suburbs with their dinky little front gardens that we are lamenting the loss of were exactly the horrible, modern monstrosities of the commuter age that took over traditional old villages and townlands in the 1920s and 30s and against which John Betjeman ranted. He wanted friendly bombs to fall on them, filled as they were with their Austin-driving bank clerks and their permed wives and their two little snotty kids, the sort of people who said "pardon" and had a nice port and lemon in the golf club that had replaced the old dairy pastures (the people otherwise known as our grandparents).

Now we lament those same houses being turned into home offices with car ports, converted garages and broadband internet connections inhabited by families from India or Latvia.

Exactly the same as we lamented the fine Regency houses of West London that were turned into ramshackle flats for immigrants in the 1950s, the immigrants who have long since been pushed out as yuppies have moved into the same areas and gentrified them all over again.

Or we regretted the loss of old craftsmen who were priced out of mews houses in Chelsea to make room for Sloane Rangers or the run-down and rusty dockside wharves that are now packed with gleaming waterside apartment blocks.

Or as mentioned above the drafty, damp-infested council houses that suddenly turned into perfect mini-Kardashian palaces as soon as Maggie sold them to their tenants.

At what point in time are we supposed to call a halt and say that this was the time when all the housing and urban facilities were just perfect?

Will we complain when the empty high streets are packed with young families living in affordable inner-city homes and regretting the loss of the former Primark stores and charity shops?
 
I weep. Through Naval radio systems, crystal radios, and amateur radio toil, you’ve come out of it with a licence (that lets you transmit on Her Majesty’s (and others’) airwaves), and the best you can come up with is “beard”? People like @greenbaggyskin, @endure, @Electromagnetic, @itchy300 and I have spent our lives in the service of v=fλ, and ”Beard” is the best you can come up with?

In any case, the 4x sheep are of less interest to me than Mrs Miggins at No73 in the middle, with a plain old Yagi pointing the either way. She’s either onto something the others aren’t, or has been left behind :)
Antennae, not aerials. Ariel was a little mermaid - or something you wash your clothes with.
(yeah, I know, different spelling but...)

And don’t even get me started on if it is antennae or antennas. (Please no more - if we are going to drift lets talk about Mrs Miggins and do we have any pictures. Of her. We can already see the Yagi...)
 

Londo

LE
Of course perhaps I should have clarified no one watches TV that comes in through a piece of wire stuck to the chimney. They watch Netflix or YouTube or Hotstar or Amazon Prime or whatever they have downloaded off pirate sites, either on the big black screen in the corner, on their gadgets or in my case on the PC screen in my home office, but I can't remember anyone actually watching free-to-view TV in months.

I only noticed this fact the other day and actually found it quite disconcerting.
We are old fashioned these days only have the terrestrial channels and freeview and get the signal from an aerial affixed to the chimney .
Was a very early customer of Sky TV when it first started years ago but once they started mucking me about regarding a (paid for) digital box that went wrong after just a few weeks and wouldn't renew it for six months they were told to go forth .

Old memory of Sky when they only had one advert :-D
 
Antennae, not aerials. Ariel was a little mermaid - or something you wash your clothes with.
(yeah, I know, different spelling but...)

And don’t even get me started on if it is antennae or antennas. (Please no more - if we are going to drift lets talk about Mrs Miggins and do we have any pictures. Of her. We can already see the Yagi...)

I didn't describe them as any of those three options :)

But they're antennas. :)
 
30 years ago we had the two car families. The mums would get themselves a car, needing two spaces.
Now we have 3- 4 cars in a family ( and sometimes a work van) as the two grown up kids live at home and each own a car.
Hence why people’s gardens are dug up and turned into car parks.
Genuinely quite sad.
30/40 years back a lot more folk could get jobs within decent striking distance via public transport.
Not any more. Have to go where the contract is, not always where you want and often, I'd bet , a small 60mpg hybrid/diesel will be a load cheaper to run than escalating train fairs.
Now, that's sad plus VAT.
 

endure

GCM
I didn't describe them as any of those three options :)

But they're antennas. :)
aer1.jpg


aer2.jpg


:wink:
 
Re: council housing. I’ve said this before, and I’ll repeat. When my dad left the army we got a council house. Nice. The council did **** all to maintain it, but the rent man (remember them? In the 1980s!) still came round every week.
Then Mrs T let my parents buy the place. Then they got central heating, decent windows, etc. When mum and dad paid for it.
 
Dunno if its been mentioned but with the aspectof global warming and the sudden large downpour of rain we recieve having a garden helps with run off. Rather than all this water flooding into sewers whcih then back up and flood properties it makes sense to have gardens. Also trees - the best air conditioning units in the world. Park under one - happy days - dad why is your car always cool - do you leave the air con on in it? Nope just park under a tree.
 
House bound pensioners, the bone idle work shy chavs, those on sick leave, and retired blokes like me, who after a rigorous day of house maintenance, gardening, shopping, shed work, pursuing my hobbies and browsing the internet, and Arrse, settle down with a mug of hot and sweet, plate of noshables, and enjoy, combat dealers, ww2 footage of the yanks in the pacific, anything by David Attenbourough, Andre Rieu or the old black and white films from the 30's-60's. If not on, a good book.

I know, its very sad, and i don't drink, i must get out more :p

Edit to add: I do not have cable satellite or any subscription TV.
One thing the pandemic has revealed (and contrary to received wisdom) is the degree of digital poverty across the UK. By this I mean regular, uninterrupted internet access - whether broadband at home or out and about on a smart phone. To out it simply, poor people cannot always afford/pass credit checks to get a home broadband package (so have to watch terrestrial/serial TV); similarly cannot always sign up to reasonable mobile packages and have PAYG packages and have to buy data (which is between 5x and 10x normal contract prices). Most acutely affected have been children being home-schooled, but it extends to people loading and using for example NHS apps or even booking Covid tests and vaccinations on line. One stat that sticks in my mind is that 30% of adult social care workers in England do not have access to smart phones; 40% do not have internet available at home and 60% don't drive and even fewer have access to cars. So, when it comes to testing and vaccinations, it's no surprise that so many of these (less than) minimum wage earners, for whom English is a confusing second language, don't get tested away from work or get vaccinated.
 
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Dunno if its been mentioned but with the aspectof global warming and the sudden large downpour of rain we recieve having a garden helps with run off. Rather than all this water flooding into sewers whcih then back up and flood properties it makes sense to have gardens. Also trees - the best air conditioning units in the world. Park under one - happy days - dad why is your car always cool - do you leave the air con on in it? Nope just park under a tree.
Urban runoff from paved areas has roughly the same water quality as secondary treated sewage (ie sewer water with the big lumps taken out). As you say, gardens and grass are excellent filters and flood attenuators.

ETA: Urban runoff has a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD).This includes sediments, particulate matter, hydrocarbon deposits, decaying animal and vegetable matter and so on.
 
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