The tragic loss of gardens

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
we live in a pre war house, it has a driveway suitable for 2 cars, although only one is ever parked there unless we have visitors, at the side of the house are wooden gates to allow access to the driveway at the side and the motor house at the rear
all pretty much origional, coupled with a lovely front garden full of flowers and grass
our neighbours removed the entire front garden to teh width of the house, including the boundary all at the front, got soem pikies in to block pave it ( its usally pikies) and now think they own the entire footpath fronting their house
they have a small fiat car, a massive 4WD and a 7.2 metre long motorhome
its pikey central

it is the Governments fault they set up the scheme, no doubt so their mates in the brick industry could make some money ( it was going out of business)
we also have houses with graveled over front gardens and the gravel ends up all over the footpath

Had the Government had any intelligence, they would have restricted the scheme to block the smaller front gardens from being removed, and making sure a boundary wall was retained

another problem is failure of services due to these large cars being driven across foot paths, and cars being parked on the footpath making it difficult for the elderly to move

Also it promotes obesity ?
because when you needed to get your car past the gates and drive out it took time, or if it was parked on the street you owuld lose your place to the neighbour who has a fleet of vehicles
, now the fat idle slobs merely waddle out of the front door, into the fatmobile and 1/16th mile to the shops

Gardens absorb water
reduce heat
and in many cases where front gardens have been paved, water pools against the house and saturates the brickwork and erodes it slowly, and leads to damp problems
also houses with bay windows, suddenly find the soil drying out and cracks appearing
 
I don't have a large garden, but it's manageable and my little haven of tranquility.
IMG-20210717-164846.jpg
 

964ST

LE
Haven't got a clue, bog standard digital aerials I believe.
Looks like good weather, unlike here in Germanland:(. Was speaking to my sister in Forres yesterday and she reckoned that the Summer in Scotland has been outstanding so far this year.
 
This was the garden before the new fence went up, I can't plant anything on the right side as the previous occupants had a large greenhouse on that side of the garden on paving slaps, it's full of gravel. The grass just grew there, we didn't seed it.
IMG_20210527_210255.jpg
 
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We used to, but the rabbits and guinea pigs kept getting in and eating everything, so it's easier to buy from Lidl now! XD

Herself has a nice vegetable garden from which my dogs were until recently banned. Shortly after things started sprouting in came the rabbits and we have plenty rabbits this year for some reason as the coyotes usually keep the numbers in check.

I told her to let the dogs back in the garden just keep them to the edges. Sure enough the dogs scent marked the fence that's around the garden and we haven't had any further rabbit problems.

She was delighted it worked but had a go for not mentioning the idea earlier.

I've been telling her this for christ knows how many years every fecking Spring.
 

Londo

LE
This was the garden before the new fence went up, I can't plant anything on the right side as the previous occupants had a large greenhouse on that side of the garden on paving slaps, it's full of gravel. The grass just grew there, we didn't seed it.
View attachment 597629
Looks nice and I see the Master and Mistress are keeping a good eye out for any intruders .
 

Londo

LE
Just as a matter of interest (you might not know!) What the hell are those aerials on the houses across the neutral green zone?
Hope you don't mind me butting in but they look like digital TV aerials to me . Just mounted high on poles due to low signal strength in the area .
Perhaps BossHogg will know more about that .
 
I live on the periphery of West London a mile and a half north of Heathrow. The town is a mixture of old housing and newish post WW2 housing estates originally built by the old Councils that existed in those days but now mostly private having been bought by the families that lived in them. The former council estates form the majority of housing stock in the area.

The houses are well built and a little on the small side but quite comfortable to live in. Most of the housing has decent sized gardens and I remember as a child that many tenants back then grew vegetables in their gardens. It was common to see half the garden laid out as a lawn with flower borders and the other half full of growing food.

Overall the area while predominantly a housing area also had a fair bit of light industry dotted around on small industrial estates which provided employment for local people. We also had a military presence with a fair sized RAF camp and the National Air Traffic Control Centre sharing a large site just up the road.

The quality of the area has always been a fairly pleasant one. The local population is a mixture of ethnicities with everybody getting along with everybody else without any problems. Most people work for a living with local industry and the airport providing work. Part of the original planning for the area included parks for people to use and playgrounds for kids to have fun in. We also have fairly decent sporting facilities particularly for local football teams on Sundays.

We are well served by local supermarkets including some of the big names and although the number of local pubs has drastically reduced over the years like everywhere else in the country, there are still some pleasant local places where you can go and have a pint and meet your mates etc.

The rot in the quality of local housing started when the RAF camp was closed and the National Air Traffic Control Centre was relocated to brand new facilities down towards Southampton. That left a huge piece of land ripe for a developer to build on and that’s exactly what happened.

Frankly, if you drive or walk around the place, you will find a very large example of a massive overdevelopment with predominantly flats crammed into every available inch and more. Some of the roads are single track in places where cars have to give way to each other because there are so many buildings crammed into the place. There is some housing other than flats. The houses that have been built look like a modern day copy of coronation street crammed together in rows.

The development has also blighted the existing surrounding estates as well because of the parking policy set in place by the owners of the estate. The problem is that the land including all the roads and parking spaces on the new estate are all still owned by the company who brought the land originally.

At the planning stage and at local public consultations, parking was discussed and local residents were assured that adequate parking would be provided on the new estate. The reality is that the owners have implemented a parking policy that is design to give themselves income rather than to properly control local parking.

Each resident on the estate is allowed to park one motor vehicle on the estate free of charge. Each additional vehicle is charged for. In modern day families, it’s common to have two cars and if you have grown up children still living with you, there can be three or even four cars in a family. So where a family on the new estate have more than one car, rather than paying the expensive costs of parking a second car etc on the estate, they simply park it on one of the surround estates and walk to their home on the new estate. Unsurprisingly, residents on the surrounding estate often come home from work to find that they can’t park outside their homes. So those residents then have to go and park outside someone else’s house. It’s made parking around here a bit of a nightmare. You never know when you come home where you are going to be able to park!

So local residents who previously didn’t have any problems now because of the greed of the landowners of the new estate are rather annoyed at what’s going on.

Many of the residents on the new estate have a problem that they didn’t foresee either. When the flats and the houses on the new estate were built for sale, they were marketed as luxury homes and accordingly, the prices reflected the “luxury” element of the deal. They aren’t “luxury” at all. They’re just ordinary sized homes crammed into a massive overdevelopment but buyers were obtaining mortgages and paying the price asked for these luxury homes.

The problem many of them now face is that having obtained a mortgage for their “luxury” home and having passed over the money to the seller, they then find that the actual market price for their new “luxury” home kicks in and their investment is actually worth quite a bit less on the housing market than what they paid for it. And of course, having obtained a mortgage which they are now paying off monthly, they now find themselves in a considerable negative equity situation!

A bit of a tale and you would think that the local Council who gave the planning permission for this housing scam as it’s pretty much turned out to be would learn some lessons for the future.

Sadly, they haven’t since this estate was built, there have now been numerous others built all over the town. Thousands of flats have been thrown up all over the place mostly at the expense of the local small industry that used to provide employment for thousands of people.

The really annoying bit is that this Council is controlled by Councillors from the north of the Borough. There is a north/south divide in Hillingdon. The north is an overwhelmingly leafy haven with very decent spread out housing set out adjacent to the most pleasant places to walk around. The south has always been the more industrially minded part with Heathrow just inside it‘s most southerly border. So those Councillors continue go back to their northern constituencies and tell their electors how well they’ve doing in raising more money to provide various things for their residents to enjoy.

We in the south are paying for it though. Not just in cash but also in the rapidly descending quality of life that living around here has become as our neighbourhood is turned into a high rise concrete jungle!

And lastly seeing as this thread is about the tragic loss of gardens. Probably since in my estimate, 95% of these new builds are high volume building developments of flats with just a handful of houses thrown in, there isn’t a garden in sight that I’ve managed to find!
 
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I live on the periphery of West London a mile and a half north of Heathrow. The town is a mixture of old housing and newish post WW2 housing estates originally built by the old Councils that existed in those days but now mostly private having been bought by the families that lived in them. The former council estates form the majority of housing stock in the area.

The houses are well built and a little on the small side but quite comfortable to live in. Most of the housing has decent sized gardens and I remember as a child that many tenants back then grew vegetables in their gardens. It was common to see half the garden laid out as a lawn with flower borders and the other half full of growing food.

Overall the area while predominantly a housing area also had a fair bit of light industry dotted around on small industrial estates which provided employment for local people. We also had a military presence with a fair sized RAF camp and the National Air Traffic Control Centre sharing a large site just up the road.

The quality of the area has always been a fairly pleasant one. The local population is a mixture of ethnicities with everybody getting along with everybody else without any problems. Most people work for a living with local industry and the airport providing work. Part of the original planning for the area included parks for people to use and playgrounds for kids to have fun in. We also have fairly decent sporting facilities particularly for local football teams on Sundays.

We are well served by local supermarkets including some of the big names and although the number of local pubs has drastically reduced over the years like everywhere else in the country, there are still some pleasant local places where you can go and have a pint and meet your mates etc.

The rot in the quality of local housing started when the RAF camp was closed and the National Air Traffic Control Centre was relocated to brand new facilities down towards Southampton. That left a huge piece of land ripe for a developer to build on and that’s exactly what happened.

Frankly, if you drive or walk around the place, you will find a very large example of a massive overdevelopment with predominantly flats crammed into every available inch and more. Some of the roads are single track in places where cars have to give way to each other because there are so many buildings crammed into the place. There is some housing other than flats. The houses that have been built look like a modern day copy of coronation street crammed together in rows.

The development has also blighted the existing surrounding estates as well because of the parking policy set in place by the owners of the estate. The problem is that the land including all the roads and parking spaces on the new estate are all still owned by the company who brought the land originally.

At the planning stage and at local public consultations, parking was discussed and local residents were assured that adequate parking would be provided on the new estate. The reality is that the owners have implemented a parking policy that is design to give themselves income rather than to properly control local parking.

Each resident on the estate is allowed to park one motor vehicle on the estate free of charge. Each additional vehicle is charged for. In modern day families, it’s common to have two cars and if you have grown up children still living with you, there can be three or even four cars in a family. So where a family on the new estate have more than one car, rather than paying the expensive costs of parking a second car etc on the estate, they simply park it on one of the surround estates and walk to their home on the new estate. Unsurprisingly, residents on the surrounding estate often come home from work to find that they can’t park outside their homes. So those residents then have to go and park outside someone else’s house. It’s made parking around here a bit of a nightmare. You never know when you come home where you are going to be able to park!

So local residents who previously didn’t have any problems now because of the greed of the landowners of the new estate are rather annoyed at what’s going on.

Many of the residents on the new estate have a problem that they didn’t foresee either. When the flats and the houses on the new estate were built for sale, they were marketed as luxury homes and accordingly, the prices reflected the “luxury” element of the deal. They aren’t “luxury” at all. They’re just ordinary sized homes crammed into a massive overdevelopment but buyers were obtaining mortgages and paying the price asked for these luxury homes.

The problem many of them now face is that having obtained a mortgage for their “luxury” home and having passed over the money to the seller, they then find that the actual market price for their new “luxury” home kicks in and their investment is actually worth quite a bit less on the housing market than what they paid for it. And of course, having obtained a mortgage which they are now paying off monthly, they now find themselves in a considerable negative equity situation!

A bit of a tale and you would think that the local Council who gave the planning permission for this housing scam as it’s pretty much turned out to be would learn some lessons for the future.

Sadly, they haven’t since this estate was built, there have now been numerous others built all over the town. Thousands of flats have been thrown up all over the place mostly at the expense of the local small industry that used to provide employment for thousands of people.

The really annoying bit is that this Council is controlled by Councillors from the north of the Borough. There is a north/south divide in Hillingdon. The north is an overwhelmingly leafy haven with very decent spread out housing set out adjacent to the most pleasant places to walk around. The south has always been the more industrially minded part with Heathrow just inside it‘s most southerly border. So those Councillors continue go back to their northern constituencies and tell their electors how well they’ve doing in raising more money to provide various things for their residents to enjoy.

We in the south are paying for it though. Not just in cash but also in the rapidly descending quality of life that living around here has become as our neighbourhood is turned into a high rise concrete jungle!

And lastly seeing as this thread is about the tragic loss of gardens. Probably since in my estimate, 95% of these new builds are high volume building developments of flats with just a handful of houses thrown in, there isn’t a garden in sight that I’ve managed to find!
Problem:- Area turning into a uninhabitable problematic shit hole, Answer MOVE. as we did many years ago. sorted. ;)
 
Problem:- Area turning into a uninhabitable problematic shit hole, Answer MOVE. as we did many years ago. sorted. ;)
We were looking around Bideford in Devon but my daughter produced a grandson and it’s delayed the move by a few years.
 
I live on the periphery of West London a mile and a half north of Heathrow. The town is a mixture of old housing and newish post WW2 housing estates originally built by the old Councils that existed in those days but now mostly private having been bought by the families that lived in them. The former council estates form the majority of housing stock in the area.

The houses are well built and a little on the small side but quite comfortable to live in. Most of the housing has decent sized gardens and I remember as a child that many tenants back then grew vegetables in their gardens. It was common to see half the garden laid out as a lawn with flower borders and the other half full of growing food.

Overall the area while predominantly a housing area also had a fair bit of light industry dotted around on small industrial estates which provided employment for local people. We also had a military presence with a fair sized RAF camp and the National Air Traffic Control Centre sharing a large site just up the road.

The quality of the area has always been a fairly pleasant one. The local population is a mixture of ethnicities with everybody getting along with everybody else without any problems. Most people work for a living with local industry and the airport providing work. Part of the original planning for the area included parks for people to use and playgrounds for kids to have fun in. We also have fairly decent sporting facilities particularly for local football teams on Sundays.

We are well served by local supermarkets including some of the big names and although the number of local pubs has drastically reduced over the years like everywhere else in the country, there are still some pleasant local places where you can go and have a pint and meet your mates etc.

The rot in the quality of local housing started when the RAF camp was closed and the National Air Traffic Control Centre was relocated to brand new facilities down towards Southampton. That left a huge piece of land ripe for a developer to build on and that’s exactly what happened.

Frankly, if you drive or walk around the place, you will find a very large example of a massive overdevelopment with predominantly flats crammed into every available inch and more. Some of the roads are single track in places where cars have to give way to each other because there are so many buildings crammed into the place. There is some housing other than flats. The houses that have been built look like a modern day copy of coronation street crammed together in rows.

The development has also blighted the existing surrounding estates as well because of the parking policy set in place by the owners of the estate. The problem is that the land including all the roads and parking spaces on the new estate are all still owned by the company who brought the land originally.

At the planning stage and at local public consultations, parking was discussed and local residents were assured that adequate parking would be provided on the new estate. The reality is that the owners have implemented a parking policy that is design to give themselves income rather than to properly control local parking.

Each resident on the estate is allowed to park one motor vehicle on the estate free of charge. Each additional vehicle is charged for. In modern day families, it’s common to have two cars and if you have grown up children still living with you, there can be three or even four cars in a family. So where a family on the new estate have more than one car, rather than paying the expensive costs of parking a second car etc on the estate, they simply park it on one of the surround estates and walk to their home on the new estate. Unsurprisingly, residents on the surrounding estate often come home from work to find that they can’t park outside their homes. So those residents then have to go and park outside someone else’s house. It’s made parking around here a bit of a nightmare. You never know when you come home where you are going to be able to park!

So local residents who previously didn’t have any problems now because of the greed of the landowners of the new estate are rather annoyed at what’s going on.

Many of the residents on the new estate have a problem that they didn’t foresee either. When the flats and the houses on the new estate were built for sale, they were marketed as luxury homes and accordingly, the prices reflected the “luxury” element of the deal. They aren’t “luxury” at all. They’re just ordinary sized homes crammed into a massive overdevelopment but buyers were obtaining mortgages and paying the price asked for these luxury homes.

The problem many of them now face is that having obtained a mortgage for their “luxury” home and having passed over the money to the seller, they then find that the actual market price for their new “luxury” home kicks in and their investment is actually worth quite a bit less on the housing market than what they paid for it. And of course, having obtained a mortgage which they are now paying off monthly, they now find themselves in a considerable negative equity situation!

A bit of a tale and you would think that the local Council who gave the planning permission for this housing scam as it’s pretty much turned out to be would learn some lessons for the future.

Sadly, they haven’t since this estate was built, there have now been numerous others built all over the town. Thousands of flats have been thrown up all over the place mostly at the expense of the local small industry that used to provide employment for thousands of people.

The really annoying bit is that this Council is controlled by Councillors from the north of the Borough. There is a north/south divide in Hillingdon. The north is an overwhelmingly leafy haven with very decent spread out housing set out adjacent to the most pleasant places to walk around. The south has always been the more industrially minded part with Heathrow just inside it‘s most southerly border. So those Councillors continue go back to their northern constituencies and tell their electors how well they’ve doing in raising more money to provide various things for their residents to enjoy.

We in the south are paying for it though. Not just in cash but also in the rapidly descending quality of life that living around here has become as our neighbourhood is turned into a high rise concrete jungle!

And lastly seeing as this thread is about the tragic loss of gardens. Probably since in my estimate, 95% of these new builds are high volume building developments of flats with just a handful of houses thrown in, there isn’t a garden in sight that I’ve managed to find!
Central Government has pressurised Local Authorities to build more for years. And this includes the NIMBY true blue areas.
LAs for years have made big noise about brown field development, but it’s too slow.
So a guy who has owned land for 20 years with a plan no one wanted is in favour.
Front gardens: I live in a late 60s house in a village in Hampshire. A little place on the edge of a big place.
I have a yew tree out front. The chaps who reduced some oaks out back did the yew for a reasonable amount. Kept the volume, and within a few years we will have a nice low coverage. We look onto a lane with a public footpath , so have lots of passers by.
Drive is solid concrete. Nearby neighbour still totters by, and reminds me he laid it way back when. You could park a Chieftain on it today.
Or lots of cars, should you wish.
 
Many of the residents on the new estate have a problem that they didn’t foresee either. When the flats and the houses on the new estate were built for sale, they were marketed as luxury homes and accordingly, the prices reflected the “luxury” element of the deal. They aren’t “luxury” at all. They’re just ordinary sized homes crammed into a massive overdevelopment but buyers were obtaining mortgages and paying the price asked for these luxury homes.

The problem many of them now face is that having obtained a mortgage for their “luxury” home and having passed over the money to the seller, they then find that the actual market price for their new “luxury” home kicks in and their investment is actually worth quite a bit less on the housing market than what they paid for it. And of course, having obtained a mortgage which they are now paying off monthly, they now find themselves in a considerable negative equity situation!
Surely that’s just the risk of investing in the property market; the principal purpose of a house stopped being a thing to live in decades ago.
 

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