The Times - Army faces huge bill for victims of rough justice

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by DangerMouse, Jan 6, 2013.

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  1. DangerMouse

    DangerMouse Old-Salt Moderator

    http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/defence/article3649756.ece
     
  2. The MoD will just get the requested exemption under military discipline.

    Swept under the carpet as always.
     
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  3. NEVER accept a caution.
     
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  4. DangerMouse

    DangerMouse Old-Salt Moderator

    Why not - what are the disadvantages? I thought that there was no effect if you got a caution - i.e. it was just a 'slap on the wrist', hence why lots of people take a caution even if they didn't do something, rather than bother with the palaver of a court hearing?


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  5. I think his point is you got a record any way. Bang to rights is one thing, innocent is another.
     
  6. If the Police and CPS can prosecute they will. If they do not have enough evidence, they may and usually do offer a caution. You have to weigh up why they are offering a caution because a caution equates to a conviction in crime recording purposes.

    It also goes on your record.

    NEVER accept a caution unless it is in your advantage to do so.
     
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  7. Why does the Times have such a hard on for the military discipline system at the minute?
     
  8. I got shouted at once, do you think I should claim....?
     
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  9. As others have stated, a caution is a guilty plea and gives you a criminal record. Never accept a caution. See a solicitor.
     
  10. Hum.

    So how would it work now if a soldier accepted a police caution for possession of a Class A/B/C drug? Prior to this, Major Admin Action was seen as a correct method of dealing with the failing (dismissal). If the Army cannot deal with this under Admin Action or Summary Hearing, what then?

    I see trouble ahead....
     
  11. wise ****ing words. Argue the ins and outs as much as you want but many a law abiding upstanding citizen has fallen foul of this.

    Stand down if you are a workshy thieving repeat offender with no future potential and a record as long as your arm

    I stopped a very drunk aquaintance (who did something pointless and stupid but unprovable by the coppers) from accepting a caution which would probably have de railed his high flying career. I had to phone another friend (A defence solicitor) to explain this to him.

    he saw sense and walked away, lesson learnt
     
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  12. double post
     
  13. So you told a friend to lie to get himself off a crime he committed and you think that is a good thing.


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  14. To administer a caution, you still have to have enough evidence to take the case to court and the offender has to freely and frankly admit the offence.

    The offender cannot have much previous and it should not be related to the offence in question. Most people who get a caution are first time offenders or it is the first time they have been caught. Why would you want to go to court if you are banged to rights rather than accept a caution.

    Remaining silent and not admitting to what you have done is one thing but refusing a caution when it is your best option is silly.


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