The Third Reich in 100 Objects

The Third Reich in 100 Objects

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Themanwho submitted a new resource:

The Third Reich in 100 Objects - A list of Nazi tat - but done well

"The Third Reich in One Hundred Objects" is an attempt to chronicle the history and effect of the Third Reich through a selection of artifacts. This sort of exercise is not usually my cup of tea, as I’ve always felt the effect of producing a list of things seems to be “Look at the shiny”, a superficial overview discouraging in-depth understanding of the subject in favour of a covetous depiction of historic tat. However, as my son is sitting his History GCSE this year I thought some...
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skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Given the appeasement from Chamberlain and the pre war lords and conservatives inviting Ribbentrop and meeting other Nazi leaders.
I’d say a Labour Party card would be a rare thing, given Attlee’s service in the First World War and with so many labour members fighting Franco in Spain.
 
I’d say a Labour Party card would be a rare thing,
I'm not so sure when you consider that Nazi is short for National Socialist German Workers Party. With a title like that, it must have had a greater lean to the left than the right.

I always chuckle when I hear of the SWP accusing people of being Nazis - the only thing they're missing is patriotism.
 
I'm not so sure when you consider that Nazi is short for National Socialist German Workers Party. With a title like that, it must have had a greater lean to the left than the right.

I always chuckle when I hear of the SWP accusing people of being Nazis - the only thing they're missing is patriotism.
I suppose Nazism could be described as Nationalism, but with a social agenda for those who qualified as Germans/Germanic (in an ethnic rather than a national sense).
That description could be applied to Nazism as it existed in WW2 but there was a long period when the party was split between those who were focused on a Socialist, anti-status quo agenda, and those like Adolf who saw the priority as national expansion and provided the social care measures to help obtain the consent of the workers for his wider agenda.
There were those in the party whose individual beliefs in some areas (anti-religion - Bormann and Goebbels) had more in common with far left policies than with the Conservative nationalism of traditional German politics.
Some features of Nazism were also shared with Communism - the idea of the individual being part a greater idea/institution, the ideas of collectivism in terms of public activities such as the yearly 'Winter Help' campaign where all were encouraged to collect and donate items to those Germans in need.
Nazism was a radical force. It appeared to be a force for continuity but it despised, and was despised by, the old order. There were apparently plans for a post-war reckoning with the nobility and clergy (postponed in wartime to create the impression of unity).
 

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