The Taliban have Kabul in their sights

#1
The Taliban have Kabul in their sights
By Syed Saleem Shahzad

KARACHI - As Pakistani politicians scramble to form a coalition government following last week's parliamentary elections, there has been a surge in violence in the Swat Valley and in other parts of North-West Frontier Province, and on Monday a senior army officer was assassinated.

The indications are that whoever takes power in Islamabad - be it the Pakistan People's Party or the Pakistan Muslim League of Nawaz Sharif or a combination of both - the real battle will be in Afghanistan between the Taliban and al-Qaeda-led militants and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and its allies.
More on the link
www.atimes.com/atimes/...7Df01.html
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#3
In-Limbo said:
Syed Saleem Shahzad seems rather optimistic that his country will be able to project any motion of civil war occurring inside Pakistan entirely onto neighbouring foreign soil,
I wish him joy of that one

or that obvious avenues of pursuit into NWFP will remain unaddressed as NATO watches on with mere "fascination".
As opposed to what? Policing everything North and East of Peshawar? A region that has never really been part of Pakistan, other than in the minds of optomistic cartographers and politicians.

When will people realise that there is only one language understood in NWFP, and always has been? Its not violence. That will get them grinning like loons and skulking around behind the many boulders and pine forests up there.

Bribery and corruption.

Pay them to see it our way. Far cheaper than military intervention, and let them make a few quid on the side running the borders.

Sod democracy, unless people are willing to fight for it. I'd be quite happy to watch in mere fascination as they administer their tribal areas. Just so they aint having a pop at the hand that feeds them. Sorry. Bribes them.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#5
In-Limbo said:
Analysts. Doncha love 'em? Strange they dont put a cost to this proposed strategy. Not in dollars, nor in flag draped coffins.

If this joint US-Pakistani taskforce lacks this counterinsurgency component, then it would probably be more reminiscent of the units designed to dismantle the drug lord Pablo Escobar’s criminal network. These US-Colombian efforts were frustrated by the large number of Escobar loyalists who had penetrated the unit and high levels Colombian government.
Ignoring for a moment the entirely fatuous comparison between a South American drugs baron and the situation North of Peshawar, do you suppose the letters ISI mean anything to these armchair pundits? Not that I am suggesting that anyone in the service of Pakistan is playing both ends against the middle up there. No.
 

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