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The steady encroachment of pseudoscience

#1
Evening all,


A friend of mine has decided to spend a considerable amount of dosh on something called 'modal spirituality', this will enable him to become a Registered Psychotherapist. Now I'm not sure what 'modal spirituality' is, but a quick google search would suggest it's got something to do with prayer and lots of woo. Websites such as "Energy medicine - Wikipedia" only support my suspicions.

Fortunately the NHS website doesn't appear to mention anything about spirituality on its Psychotherapy website: Psychotherapy - NHS Choices

The problem appears to be worse across the pond, entire universities are built upon this house of cards and offer PHDs in worthless mumbo-jumbo like healing crystals and tarot cards. (Spiritual Psychotherapy Program | Transformational Arts College of Spiritual and Holistic Training) The danger is that some people then claim to go around being real doctors when they have a PHD in the make-believe. Are we in danger of pseudoscience infringing upon the hallowed halls of proper science? It seems a growing number of journals are cropping up which masquerade as scientific literature and I fear this will obfuscate the facts for ordinary people seeking proper research.

The bit that really grips me about all this spiritual malarkey is the absurdity of it all in the face of hard facts. If it was actually true it would be the biggest discovery in all of History, therefore anyone claiming to have proper powers of 'spirituality' should be more forthcoming about being subject to fair scientific tests. If it is shown to be bollocks they should stand by the results and drop their charade, otherwise they're nothing more than snake-oil salesmen.

Has anyone else had any experience of this?
 
#4
A well meaning mate of mine got led right up the garden path by a psychotherapy "training establishment" in Cardiff. All they ever wanted was his hard earned, both to rent the premises he was going to counsel in, "tuition fees" and even more perversely on top of paying he had to then find his own clients.

That being said however I can't comment on the evidence base of the training received but the above paragraph doesn't usually bode well for supposed Healthcare vocations IME.
 
#5
Phrenology comes to mind but at least their representative body had some scruples and disbanded when their pseudo science was disproved.
 
#6
I might be doing a disservice to some people but the old expression, a fool and his money are easily parted did cross my mind.

Having said that, a slick con merchant can achieve spectacular results with the right tools.
 
#7
I have a couple of friends who are convinced by such things as crystal healing and homeopathy. I'm tempted to set myself up as a supplier of crystals and homeopathy cures, preventatives and medicines. The expensive part will be the tiny bottles and labels, the tap wat... carefully selected, accurately diluted and hygienically packaged products will be sourced from ethically reliable providers using the green energy while constantly ensuring our carbon footprint is minimal and offset by our bio conservation area.


Yes, I'll be filtering rainwater into bottles in the garden.
 
#8
Nothing new I'm afraid. The Victorians loved this sort of crap although there was sufficient proof by then that all of it was bollocks. Even earlier suckers, without the advantage of widespread scientific experience but the disadvantage of widespread religion, lived by it.

We should know better but you can fool a lot of the people most of the time......
 
#9
You can thank social media, they now have the ability to peddle their nonsense to the masses without providing any proof. When someone asks for proof of what they claim that person is dismissed as a shill of "big pharma" or some other nonsense and is blocked from commenting again. Facebook is dumbing down the planet.
 
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#10
Moon howlers to a man

Incredibly people who research this nonsense up to the max on google and swear by it generally fail to take any notice of all standard evidence based science/medicine

Conspiracy theory for the medically challenged
 
#11
Moon howlers to a man

Incredibly people who research this nonsense up to the max on google and swear by it generally fail to take any notice of all standard evidence based science/medicine

Conspiracy theory for the medically challenged
I enjoy when they say they have done their research, via the lab of Google.
 
#13
You can thank social media, they now have the ability to peddle their nonsense to the masses without providing any proof. When someone asks for proof of what they claim that person is dismissed as a shill of "big pharma" or some other nonsense and is blocked from commenting again. Facebook is dumbing down the planet.
Ah you too know people who are at great pains to point out there's a natural cure for Cancer - but they don't want us to know because they make money of peddling false treatments like Chemotherapy
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#14
#16
Evening all,


A friend of mine has decided to spend a considerable amount of dosh on something called 'modal spirituality', this will enable him to become a Registered Psychotherapist. Now I'm not sure what 'modal spirituality' is, but a quick google search would suggest it's got something to do with prayer and lots of woo. Websites such as "Energy medicine - Wikipedia" only support my suspicions.

Fortunately the NHS website doesn't appear to mention anything about spirituality on its Psychotherapy website: Psychotherapy - NHS Choices

The problem appears to be worse across the pond, entire universities are built upon this house of cards and offer PHDs in worthless mumbo-jumbo like healing crystals and tarot cards. (Spiritual Psychotherapy Program | Transformational Arts College of Spiritual and Holistic Training) The danger is that some people then claim to go around being real doctors when they have a PHD in the make-believe. Are we in danger of pseudoscience infringing upon the hallowed halls of proper science? It seems a growing number of journals are cropping up which masquerade as scientific literature and I fear this will obfuscate the facts for ordinary people seeking proper research.

The bit that really grips me about all this spiritual malarkey is the absurdity of it all in the face of hard facts. If it was actually true it would be the biggest discovery in all of History, therefore anyone claiming to have proper powers of 'spirituality' should be more forthcoming about being subject to fair scientific tests. If it is shown to be bollocks they should stand by the results and drop their charade, otherwise they're nothing more than snake-oil salesmen.

Has anyone else had any experience of this?
I think it was Lawrence Krauss who nailed it.

He pointed out that if Chinese medicine or homeopathic medicine worked, it would be tested.

There's a word for products like this that are tested and work.

'Medicine'.
 
#17
Don't forget that a highly alkaline diet can destroy cancer

and so can cannabis
and dichloroacetic acid
and natural enzymes
etc
 
#18
There are those who would argue that psychotherapy (whether "spiritual" or otherwise) is, at best, utter b0ll1x and total charlatanry with no proper basis in science whatever - and that its practitioners should not in any way be compared to psychiatrists or psychologists who at least have some meaningful and properly accredited training behind them.

(I should add that personally I have no particular view on the matter - but would be unlikely to "go into therapy" unless I woke up one morning and found that I had become Woody Allen)
 
#19
The church. They set up oxford and are still getting away with it. They also make lots of dosh.
 

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