The selling of the 4 Type 22Cs for scrap

#3
Bit of a one sided argument. Training,spare parts and repairs are all doable with money and the right attitude. True if they are knackered they are of no use, however these ships still had a good few years in them and were versatile.
 
#5
Bit of a one sided argument. Training,spare parts and repairs are all doable with money and the right attitude. True if they are knackered they are of no use, however these ships still had a good few years in them and were versatile.
Bad time to sell and costly to keep support infrastructure going purely for sales purposes. Once binned we like to get rid of stuff ASAP and forget about it. Rightly so as well.
 
#6
"Bit of a one sided argument. Training,spare parts and repairs are all doable with money and the right attitude. True if they are knackered they are of no use, however these ships still had a good few years in them and were versatile."

As the author of the piece, the point was more that if the money no longer exists (which it didnt thanks to SDSR) then there was little else that could be done. The ships had about 5-8 years left on the clock, and while useful were increasingly expensive to maintain. They are missed, but less so than if we'd lost 4 Type 23s IMHO.
 
#7
Bad time to sell, and a risky option to keep maintaining them on the off chance that a buyer can be found in the future.

Good ships by all account. Many Matelots I know rate them more than the Type 23s.
 
#8
I was a 22 rating. Then ended up on a 23. I called in a few favours and ensured i got drafted straight back to a 22.

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#11
22s were just overmanned yachts.
 
#13
"Bit of a one sided argument. Training,spare parts and repairs are all doable with money and the right attitude. True if they are knackered they are of no use, however these ships still had a good few years in them and were versatile."

As the author of the piece, the point was more that if the money no longer exists (which it didnt thanks to SDSR) then there was little else that could be done. The ships had about 5-8 years left on the clock, and while useful were increasingly expensive to maintain. They are missed, but less so than if we'd lost 4 Type 23s IMHO.
From the article you state that the MOD received 3M for the ships or 750,000 for 5K tn ish / ship of scrap metal or 150/tn

Just scooted around some scrap metal sites and can not get an immediate comparison and therefore whether this is a good price. I have no idea - maybe it is... Scant return on navy's £1.2bn frigate sale | UK news | The Guardian

Anyone help?

Krom
 
#14
I was offered between 90 to 120 quid per tonne when I phoned around some scrappies last year. I suspect that large quantities of BX plate might be worth a bit more. Dont forget theres several hundred tonnes of CuNi pipework in each hull.

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rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#15
I was a 22 rating. Then ended up on a 23. I called in a few favours and ensured i got drafted
straight back to a 22.

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Comparing a 22 to a 23 is like trying to compare a Bently to a Mondeo.

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So what made 22s special in comparison to 23s in your opinion?
 
#16
So what made 22s special in comparison to 23s in your opinion?
Good looking ships that got good trips. Enough manpower onboard to reduce the number of onerous
routine tasks that makes life on a 23 so morale sapping.
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#17
From the article you state that the MOD received 3M for the ships or 750,000 for 5K tn ish / ship of scrap metal or 150/tn

Just scooted around some scrap metal sites and can not get an immediate comparison and therefore whether this is a good price. I have no idea - maybe it is... Scant return on navy's £1.2bn frigate sale | UK news | The Guardian

Anyone help?

Krom
I suspect that part of the reason for the price to be so low is the need to safely dispose of the toxic materials that are part of the ships structure, I think there a large quantities of asbestos and other fire retardant materials on board that will be expensive to remove.

Question what are we using as a replacement for these ships?
 
#18
#19
We're not; 19 ships are doing the tasking of 23.
That's piss poor planning by some one, probably the late lamented Labour government, not to put a replacement program in hand as I'm assuming that the other 19 hulls will soon be following their sister ships to the scrappy.

Is this disarmament by stealth as new ships will take at least a decade to commission leaving us no choice but to accept the protection of UK waters by the EU.
 
#20
That's piss poor planning by some one, probably the late lamented Labour government, not to put a replacement program in hand as I'm assuming that the other 19 hulls will soon be following their sister ships to the scrappy.

Is this disarmament by stealth as new ships will take at least a decade to commission leaving us no choice but to accept the protection of UK waters by the EU.
Nope, it was a in-year saving caused solely by SDSR 2010, and willingly accepted by the NSC 'on risk'. Which is great for them, because as they sit in their offices in London, the risk has no effect on their daily family life, unlike us at sea.

And remove your head from your arse, the EU has nothing to do with this.
 

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