The Sandhurst Foundation

#1
The Sandhurst Foundation - has anyone here got first hand experience of this lot? Or, indeed, are you a member? It's only a tenner a year to join, but is it worth it?

Thanks.
 
#3
There is a very lengthy debate in the RMAS pages on Linked in about the future direction of the Sandhurst Foundation.

The trustees of the Sandhurst Foundation have initiated a review of what the charity is, what it does and who it does this for. The intent is to define the Foundation's future purpose and map how this vision should be achieved. It is likely to involve a shift of emphasis from event management within the Royal Military Academy to the promotion of command and leadership skills throughout the Army's officer corps, Regular and Reserve, serving and retired. There is much work to be done but the trustees intent to drive this forward with vigour. I look forward, as the Foundation's new Director, to the discussion that will surround the work and would warmly welcome your ideas and opinions.
http://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&gid=35511&item=ANET:S:129886514&trk=NUS_RITM-title

As an ex Officer it would be useful if it championed the value of military leadership to the wider world. I am not convinced that the Sandhurst Foundation can have any role promoting leadership skills in the serving Army, unless its a euphemism for raiding whatever is in the Foundation coffers to subsidise Officer training. ;)
 
#4
I've been back to Sandhurst for a few evening lectures. Took some colleagues with me, some involved in executive leadership development for my FTSE 100 company. They were all very impressed with the cadets, the institution and the lectures (one notable one on the stress of leadership drew on a recording of the speaker leading his company under fire on Herrick after his dictaphone accidentally activated-inspiring) even just one event makes the £10 worthwhile. However, I await the change in direction with interest.
 
#5
There is a very lengthy debate in the RMAS pages on Linked in about the future direction of the Sandhurst Foundation.


http://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&gid=35511&item=ANET:S:129886514&trk=NUS_RITM-title

As an ex Officer it would be useful if it championed the value of military leadership to the wider world. I am not convinced that the Sandhurst Foundation can have any role promoting leadership skills in the serving Army, unless its a euphemism for raiding whatever is in the Foundation coffers to subsidise Officer training. ;)
Lengthy, but dull. You could shorten it if that bloke stopped telling his life story and lost the massive chip on his shoulder about the REME.

I can't really see what the Foundation is honestly for. It's like they realised they didn't have one, set it up and filled it with a few jolly nice RO types, gave it a very modest income by insisting cadets joined, and are now waiting for inspiration. No world-beating ideas in that thread, either.
 
#6
Lengthy, but dull. You could shorten it if that bloke stopped telling his life story and lost the massive chip on his shoulder about the REME.

I can't really see what the Foundation is honestly for. It's like they realised they didn't have one, set it up and filled it with a few jolly nice RO types, gave it a very modest income by insisting cadets joined, and are now waiting for inspiration. No world-beating ideas in that thread, either.
There is a value for reserve and ex officers in having an organisation which acts as a champion for the values of leadership developed by RMAS. The wider world is full of organisations promoting their culture and ethos, and by extension the value of their alumni to employers. Ex officers and reservists compete for employment with people who are alumni from business schools accountants , lawyers, management consultants or blue chip companies who claim that there is something special about the training and ethos of their staff.

There is a pecking order in the commercial world and employers are more likely to shortlist a candidate from, say Mckinsey than from businesses which do not have a reputation for thought leadership in their field. It must help if someone is out there plugging the value of the RMAS leadership approach.

I suspect it is gettign harder and harder to find employers whoi understand and value the ethos of leadership. For several decades years after the Second World War, employers were run by people with their own war experience. Since 1979 the dominant model has been to apply a market model to almost every situation. RNMAS is rare in developing leadership skills that do not rely on the offer of bonuses and the threat of replacement.
 
#7
There is a value for reserve and ex officers in having an organisation which acts as a champion for the values of leadership developed by RMAS. The wider world is full of organisations promoting their culture and ethos, and by extension the value of their alumni to employers. Ex officers and reservists compete for employment with people who are alumni from business schools accountants , lawyers, management consultants or blue chip companies who claim that there is something special about the training and ethos of their staff.

There is a pecking order in the commercial world and employers are more likely to shortlist a candidate from, say Mckinsey than from businesses which do not have a reputation for thought leadership in their field. It must help if someone is out there plugging the value of the RMAS leadership approach.

I suspect it is gettign harder and harder to find employers whoi understand and value the ethos of leadership. For several decades years after the Second World War, employers were run by people with their own war experience. Since 1979 the dominant model has been to apply a market model to almost every situation. RNMAS is rare in developing leadership skills that do not rely on the offer of bonuses and the threat of replacement.
Let's see how Tranches 1 - 4 get on then!
 
#9
I was gassing with a retired two-star yesterday who'd previously had some association with RMAS. He described the Sandhurst Foundation as a 'life support system for a fridge magnet.'

Work to do then...
 
#10
Ooooh, book now (£60) for a chance to dine and listen to Kate Adie. Wow.

No apparent irony in the invitation, but hopefully a few people will save their bread rolls to lob at the woman.
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#14
They probably need the money. When I saw the accounts (published in the back of the Wishstream) it revealed that the Sandhurst Foundation makes no profit (and sometimes a slight loss) even with significant income from renting out RMAS property for weddings and other functions. Given that my £10 was advertised as being used to help maintain the buildings, I'm a little irritated to discover that RMAS would have more money if they closed the Foundation overnight.
 
#17
If the charity needs to have a serious think about what the point of existing is then why not just knock it on the head and give a few bob to a children's hospice or some such?

As a serving officer I could see no benefit in the Sandhurst Foundation. Now I've left, the ludicrous nature of getting new starters to sign up for a tenner a year for something that nobody (not even the organisation itself!) has any idea about what to use the money for makes me feel a bit sorry for RMAS as an institution. It is simply a little bit tragic:

"Give us yer money or else!"
"What for?"
"Promoting ethos you d!ckhead - what do you think it's for"
"How are you going to do that?"
"Too many questions, you don't get this ethos sh!t do you! - write a letter explaining why you think your boss is a knob for enforcing this policy and how the ethos of this fine establishment means so little to you you can't pay a measly tenner"
"Alright I'll pay the tenner"


Also, I'd pay 60 quid to not bother having dinner with Kate Adie.
 
#18
Lengthy, but dull. You could shorten it if that bloke stopped telling his life story and lost the massive chip on his shoulder about the REME.

.
Did you get the InMail from some tedious zip sniffer who took over the running of the group after TSF realised it was all of 5 mins work running it and now wants to turn it into an academic discussion board because he's an "academic" himself, and less of a "I remember when" forum? If our experience on ARRSE has taught us anything it's that trying to dictate what people can talk about in a thread kills a forum.

Oh, and if the "totty" reference earlier in this thread was made in reference to the marketing manager, I wouldn't kick her out of bed for farting under the duvet, but neither would I climb over Nazaneen Ghaffar to get to her. Perhaps I should start an academic thread on the matter on LI......
 
#19
Did you get the InMail from some tedious zip sniffer who took over the running of the group after TSF realised it was all of 5 mins work running it and now wants to turn it into an academic discussion board because he's an "academic" himself, and less of a "I remember when" forum? If our experience on ARRSE has taught us anything it's that trying to dictate what people can talk about in a thread kills a forum.

Oh, and if the "totty" reference earlier in this thread was made in reference to the marketing manager, I wouldn't kick her out of bed for farting under the duvet, but neither would I climb over Nazaneen Ghaffar to get to her. Perhaps I should start an academic thread on the matter on LI......
Oh, I don't check that site very often - it has no value really. As for Inmails - I get quite a lot and one from that group isn't likely to get a reading. Looks like the troublesome codger has poked off.

Dearie me. An academic - how thrilling. It's a shame LI can't be trolled - I wonder if that bloke idly toys with an 'inert' grenade in between lecturing cadets?
 
#20
I did get a nice pair of cufflinks last time I was there.......
 

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