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The Russkies are back!!!

#1
Why are they spying on us? Are they looking for intelligence on how not to equip and run their Armed Forces? Or maybe they believe that our equipment is so sh!t it must be a cover for a frighteningly effective capability. Oops, hope I haven't let the cat out of the bag!

From the Independent:

Carry on spying: Russian agents flood UK in revival of intelligence Cold War
By Jason Bennetto, Crime Correspondent
26 October 2004


Russia has resumed Cold War levels of spying and intelligence gathering in Britain, senior Whitehall and security sources have told The Independent.

Among the spies are at least 32 Russian diplomats who are attempting to obtain secret information about the United Kingdom's military, technical and political capabilities, according to authoritative sources.

The spy network is also collecting information about opponents and critics of Vladimir Putin, the Russian President and a former KGB officer, who are exiles in Britain.

A Whitehall source said: "The level of espionage by the Russians in the UK is back to Cold War levels: it is business as usual for the spies."

MI5, the counter-intelligence agency, has warned David Blunkett, the Home Secretary, of the growing Russian spying activities. It is concerned that funding for counter-espionage work has been cut by half because resources have been reallocated to deal with al-Qa'ida.

A confidential document, Espionage Threat, based on information provided by M15 and MI6, the Secret Intelligence Service, also reveals that Russian spies have been monitoring the movements of military aircraft in the UK.

The classified paper, written by military intelligence earlier this year, said the agents were using the internet to target military specialists with access to secret information.

Several Russians have left Britain for alleged spying activities, although these departures have not been publicised to avoid a diplomatic rift with the Putin government. The build-up of the Russian spying capability in Britain and other European countries follows a policy change by President Putin since coming to power in 2000.

Putin has replaced the powerful oligarchs of the Boris Yeltsin era with intelligence and military officers. The old Soviet culture of secrecy and foreign espionage has returned under the Putin regime.

Britain is of great interest to Russia because of its strong ties to the United States and its influential role in Nato, and its attitudes towards Iraq and Iran. In addition, the oligarchy and opponents of Putin living in the UK are prime targets for the Russian spying machine. These have included fallen oligarchs, such as Boris Berezovsky, who has been in exile since 2000.

In Britain, the Russian spying network is run by the SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service), which partly replaced the old KGB, and the GRU, the military intelligence organisation. The SVR has about 18 officers in Britain, while the GRU has about 14, all of whom have diplomatic status, according to intelligence sources. They say officers each have dozens of informers and agents. SVR is divided into three specialist fields - gaining intelligence on political issues, matters of security, and technology, such as military and commercial secrets.

The GRU, which is considered the most hardline and active of the agencies and which also runs dozens of agents, is involved in obtaining information on issues such as Britain's nuclear and military capabilities, and American bases.

MI5 and MI6 have given a series of warnings about the growth of Russian espionage to the Intelligence and Security Committee, the group of MPs that oversees security matters.

The committee's annual report, published earlier this year, said: "The threat from espionage did not disappear when the Cold War ended ... countries such as Russia and China still want to acquire both classified material and technology for exploitation by their own industry."

It also noted that in 1999/2000 MI5 allocated 20 per cent of its budget to counter-espionage work, the bulk of which involved Russian spy activities. This has since dropped to 10 per cent. Eliza Manningham-Buller, the director general of MI5, told the committee: "There's not less of it [espionage] about, we are doing less work on it, we are being more selective about the priority cases. It is something I have discussed with the Home Secretary: I recently gave him a summary and he is well aware that we are carrying some risk here.

"The plan is to back-fill when we can, but the problem is that the international counter-terrorist work is moving and expanding at such a rate."

Oleg Gordievsky, the double agent who served as head of the KGB at the Soviet Embassy in London before he defected in 1985, said: "The strength of the KGB is that there are so many Russians living here and working for British companies. Each second Russian in a position of some importance is acting as an informer to the KGB.

"The information is about individuals who might be of interest to the Russian authorities and technology. They also want information about politicians. They have become much more active under Putin. Russia is under the foot of the KGB now."

Alex Standish, editor of Jane's Intelligence Digest, said: "We are seeing a steady increase in the number of diplomats being posted in the UK. If you look at the profile of the individuals you see a significant proportion of these people are linked to the SVR. Putin is rapidly building up intelligence systems that have been allowed to fall into decline under the Yeltsin era."

A spokesman from the Russian Embassy, based at Kensington Palace Gardens, in west London, said: "No comment".
 
#2
So has anyone here had a dodgy PM?

"Oh hi Comr.... errr mate , I see you're working with Bowman , tsk tsk crap innit ? By the way , I'm having trouble with the databurst capability when the satellite is shaded in the 5'o clock azimuth at an angle of 42.7 degrees , are you having the same problem?"

I would hope most people here would either ignore , or flag an out of the blue PM from someone "interested in what they do"

So beware PM's from people you've never ever spoken to , PM's that ask about Technical specifics or comparisons ,what you do in the Army or where your last posting or next posting will be etc etc.

Especially PM's from "Female students interested in the Army"

I know when it happens in open forum, most of you are quick to jump in with "Why do you want to know that , are you KGB or summat?"

But , joking aside, be aware it's not just "Military enthusiasts" that are interested in any snippets of information
 
#4
I never had a PM from any female students interested in the Army...am I doing something wrong???

"Hello, I am Natasha and I am interested in the Army. I need you to see if my bosom is suitable for the military environment and if my private hair is cut correctly. I am doing a project on the (insert overbudget capability here) and if you send me information on the (insert embarrasingly precise technichal specifics here) I will send you photos of my bosom and private hair for evaluation"
 
#5
The problem (alledgedly) with Russian women and "private hair" is that it tends to cover more than the usual target area. You could get a 'photo of her sternum. Not nice, and hardly worth telling them why it is our radios don't work. Alternatively we could just sell them some dodgy submarines. Preferably crewed by satanists...
 
#6
Well if some lovely Russian slapper wants to know all my secrets of the DMS, she can come round to my office and take down the particulars in question and I will help fill her with all the information she needs. Then if she needs more oral verification of the problems I face, I can give her that too. However if she wants too much, I can always show her the back entrance and tell her to kiss it, which hopefully she might :twisted:
 
#7
In my experience most Russian military who come to the UK are more interested in going to Madame Tusuards and shopping in Argos than they are in trying to get any useful int.
 
#9
MrPVRd said:
Oleg Gordievsky, the double agent who served as head of the KGB at the Soviet Embassy in London before he defected in 1985, said: "The strength of the KGB is that there are so many Russians living here and working for British companies. Each second Russian in a position of some importance is acting as an informer to the KGB.
Two McDonalds stars?
 
#11
MrPVRd said:
Why are they spying on us?
From the Independent:

Carry on spying: Russian agents flood UK in revival of intelligence Cold War
By Jason Bennetto, Crime Correspondent
26 October 2004


MI5, the counter-intelligence agency, has warned David Blunkett, the Home Secretary, of the growing Russian spying activities. It is concerned that funding for counter-espionage work has been cut by half because resources have been reallocated to deal with al-Qa'ida.
d.
Ob dear, our budget has been cut - let's invent some spies to get it re-instated.

Watch 'The Power of Nightmares' 21.00 tomorrow BBC2 - you'll get the idea.
 
#15
F*ck it, I am open to offers. :D

Fifty quid gets you the secret ingredients to the Naval Cheesy-Hammy-Eggy, though will settle for "Honey-trap" style blackmail at a pinch... :D
 
#16
dui-lai said:
Well if some lovely Russian slapper wants to know all my secrets of the DMS, she can come round to my office and take down the particulars in question and I will help fill her with all the information she needs. Then if she needs more oral verification of the problems I face, I can give her that too. However if she wants too much, I can always show her the back entrance and tell her to kiss it, which hopefully she might :twisted:
The old song wishing on a star comes to mind typical Medic talking about ARRSE kissing again (please Sir it was not me sp££k me quick :roll: )
 
#17
But , joking aside, be aware it's not just "Military enthusiasts" that are interested in any snippets of information
Straying off the subject slightly, isn't this military culture of secrecy a bit counter productive when it comes to military kit. If information on miltary equipment was more open, it would make it very difficult to hide problems with deficient or dangerous kit. If the enemy is really stupid they might try and build the same bit of kit themselves. (russians copied concorde and the space shuttle, both flawed designs)


Sort of example I was thinking of was the pariot missle system. After gulf war one the US military claimed it was around 80% sucessful, MIT professor Theodore Postol carried out his own analysis and forced the US to admit it was more like 10% (and it might have been zero). Some would suggest theres no problem with this since it helps boost defence exports, but in the second gulf war its main sucess was shooting down friendly planes (incidently the parriot system was orginally designed as an anti aircraft system not as a anti ballistic system).

Another example is the internet, when it was first developed by the US miltary the information required to build such a system was made freely available. The hope was that the russian might build a similar system which could survive a nuclear attack, so russian and american leaders could keep in touch.

Finally, secrecy makes a system brittle, once the secret is out, kit may have to be junked. Here's a non military example


Seems you can open Kryptonite bicycle locks with the cap from a plastic pen. The attack works on what locksmiths call the "impressioning" principle. Tubular locks are especially vulnerable to this because all the pins are exposed, and tools that require little skill to use can be relatively unsophisticated. There have been commercial locksmithing products to do this to circular locks for a long time. Once you get the feel for how to do it, it's pretty easy. I find Kryptonite's proposed solution -- swapping for a smaller diameter lock so a particular brand of pen won't work -- to be especially amusing.
<http://www.indystar.com/articles/0/179342-1470-223.html>
<http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,64987,00.html>
<http://www.bikeforums.net/>

ideas in this post have been stolen from Bruce Schneier
 
#18
chechyna or chelsea if you were a gru kgb (or what ever its called now )
agent which would you rather infiltrate i guess some commander is taking very large kick backs to arrange postings to uk and lying through teeth to justfiy his budget. Or do they really believe we are a threat?
 
#19
Don't worry about the Russians. What about the Chinese, how else do you think, has their economy grown so rapidly. By nicking technology, reverse engineering it, and then selling it to Iran,Iraq, India, Pakistan, North Korea etc etc etc.

PS. I am not a real spy. Crap or otherwise.
 

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