The Royal Marines amphibious role ?

RM operating as part of 7th (USMC) Marine Regt and along side others it would appear
It was at the very least an exaggeration that the UK press got carried away with.

The press in general tend to shoot from the hip in an effort to 'scoop' the others, and in this case good performance got blown well out of proportion.

Made for a good story, nice to think it was true, but in this case may have made our hosts embarrassed and possibly less than amiable about an abuse of hospitality not by our lads over there, but the press over here. It sadly detracts from what may well have been a really good performance by our various units over there.

Jingoism by newspapers who should have known better.
 

Yokel

LE
Back on the amphibious theme, I think it safe to say that its value to NATO has been understood.

From 11 Jan 21: UK Defence Journal - British assault ship sails to lead Response Force Group

The Defence Command Paper defines a Response Group as “A bespoke force assigned to a geographical area, that contains dedicated shipping, helicopters and boats”. The UK Response Group has also been known as the Littoral Response Group (North).

According to the Royal Navy, under plans announced in the recent defence review, there will eventually be two Littoral Response Groups (North and South) regularly deployed in regions of strategic importance to the UK, one with a focus on European waters (North) and the other looking to the east and south of the Suez Canal (South).

“They are designed to put the UK’s commando forces in forward positions, where they will be able to react quickly to any crises but also continually work with allies. This is part of the Future Commando Force modernisation, which returns Royal Marines to raiders from the sea, equips them for a new era of combat and places them in forward positions important to UK security.”

Previously when the Response Group (North) sailed, it was made up of amphibious assault ship HMS Albion and landing dock RFA Mounts Bay, plus Type 23 frigate HMS Lancaster, Wildcat helicopters from 847 Naval Air Squadron, and Royal Marines from 45 and 30 Commando.

Littoral Response Group (South), when formed in 2023, will be based at the UK Joint Logistics Support Base in Oman with responsibility for the Indo-Pacific region.
 

Truxx

LE
Back on the amphibious theme, I think it safe to say that its value to NATO has been understood.

From 11 Jan 21: UK Defence Journal - British assault ship sails to lead Response Force Group

The Defence Command Paper defines a Response Group as “A bespoke force assigned to a geographical area, that contains dedicated shipping, helicopters and boats”. The UK Response Group has also been known as the Littoral Response Group (North).

According to the Royal Navy, under plans announced in the recent defence review, there will eventually be two Littoral Response Groups (North and South) regularly deployed in regions of strategic importance to the UK, one with a focus on European waters (North) and the other looking to the east and south of the Suez Canal (South).

“They are designed to put the UK’s commando forces in forward positions, where they will be able to react quickly to any crises but also continually work with allies. This is part of the Future Commando Force modernisation, which returns Royal Marines to raiders from the sea, equips them for a new era of combat and places them in forward positions important to UK security.”

Previously when the Response Group (North) sailed, it was made up of amphibious assault ship HMS Albion and landing dock RFA Mounts Bay, plus Type 23 frigate HMS Lancaster, Wildcat helicopters from 847 Naval Air Squadron, and Royal Marines from 45 and 30 Commando.

Littoral Response Group (South), when formed in 2023, will be based at the UK Joint Logistics Support Base in Oman with responsibility for the Indo-Pacific region.
I used to write that sort of stuff.

Looking back I am reminded of a fave expression of one of my QMs

"That is a fine example of someone confusing ambition with capability". He would generally be referring to an individual, but sometimes it could be applied to the group think of the day.
 
Back on the amphibious theme, I think it safe to say that its value to NATO has been understood.

From 11 Jan 21: UK Defence Journal - British assault ship sails to lead Response Force Group

The Defence Command Paper defines a Response Group as “A bespoke force assigned to a geographical area, that contains dedicated shipping, helicopters and boats”. The UK Response Group has also been known as the Littoral Response Group (North).

According to the Royal Navy, under plans announced in the recent defence review, there will eventually be two Littoral Response Groups (North and South) regularly deployed in regions of strategic importance to the UK, one with a focus on European waters (North) and the other looking to the east and south of the Suez Canal (South).

“They are designed to put the UK’s commando forces in forward positions, where they will be able to react quickly to any crises but also continually work with allies. This is part of the Future Commando Force modernisation, which returns Royal Marines to raiders from the sea, equips them for a new era of combat and places them in forward positions important to UK security.”

Previously when the Response Group (North) sailed, it was made up of amphibious assault ship HMS Albion and landing dock RFA Mounts Bay, plus Type 23 frigate HMS Lancaster, Wildcat helicopters from 847 Naval Air Squadron, and Royal Marines from 45 and 30 Commando.

Littoral Response Group (South), when formed in 2023, will be based at the UK Joint Logistics Support Base in Oman with responsibility for the Indo-Pacific region.

It is but each of these will be Bn Gp in size if fully deployed

Does that mean Coy plus normally?
 

Yokel

LE
Our amphibious assets are very much part of NATO - so we did anyone propose getting rid of them?

HMS Albion sails for the fjords ahead of NATO’s Arctic exercises -22 Feb 22

HMS Albion heads for the Arctic as the spearhead of amphibious/commando forces taking part in Exercise Cold Response – a month-long test by land, sea and air of allied forces to operate in one of the most challenging environment on the planet.

Albion prepared for her Arctic mission with intensive operational training in and around Plymouth which culminated earlier this month in a joint disaster relief/civilian evacuation test, working side-by-side with the Dutch Navy’s HNLMS
Karel Doorman.

HMS Albion is embarking a staff to direct amphibious operations, the headquarters of 3 Commando Brigade and Royal Marines packing Albion “absolutely up to the gunnels” from her usual 340 souls to around 1,000 at the height of Cold Response.

Alongside landing support ship RFA
Mounts Bay, Albion leads the UK’s amphibious input into Cold Response, with “a significant level” of littoral strike operations – traditional-style commando raids – staged in the fjords, with the British force integrating with numerous allies, including the US, Norwegians, French, Germans and Italians.

“The UK has long had a very specific roll up in the high north in the Arctic. And it's all part of our routine development of that capability,” said Captain Simon Kelly, HMS
Albion’s Commanding Officer.

“Our ability to plug into and integrate into larger task groups is absolutely the core of all our capabilities, and it's that integration into the bigger piece of NATO, that collective ability which really brings the fighting edge to NATO.”

Royal Marines carry out fjord recce mission as huge Arctic exercises with NATO allies take shape - 3 March 22

Expert teams from 30 Commando Information Exploitation Group swam ashore and used inflatable raiding boats, before studying their surroundings to carefully calculate the best place for troops to land and hit an adversary decisively.

The commandos carried out this essential training in northern Norway to ensure that amphibious forces are able to access the rugged Arctic coastline when the Norwegian-led Exercise
Cold Response begins in earnest next week alongside a galvanised NATO effort for peace and stability in Europe.

Around 35,000 troops from 28 nations are expected to be involved in
Cold Response, which will show how a unified multilateral force would defend Norway and Europe’s northern flank from a modern adversary.

Roughly 900 Royal Marines will spearhead the UK involvement, raiding along the rugged Norwegian coastline from
an amphibious task group led by HMS Albion.

Aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales will deploy to the exercise, with frigate HMS Richmond, Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender, a Royal Fleet Auxiliary tanker and a nuclear-powered attack submarine escorting her.

UK Merlin and Wildcat helicopters will patrol the skies, supporting commando operations and hunting submarines alongside a wide range of aircraft from across NATO, including F-35 fighter jets and attack helicopters.
 
Our amphibious assets are very much part of NATO - so we did anyone propose getting rid of them?

HMS Albion sails for the fjords ahead of NATO’s Arctic exercises -22 Feb 22

HMS Albion heads for the Arctic as the spearhead of amphibious/commando forces taking part in Exercise Cold Response – a month-long test by land, sea and air of allied forces to operate in one of the most challenging environment on the planet.

Albion prepared for her Arctic mission with intensive operational training in and around Plymouth which culminated earlier this month in a joint disaster relief/civilian evacuation test, working side-by-side with the Dutch Navy’s HNLMS
Karel Doorman.

HMS Albion is embarking a staff to direct amphibious operations, the headquarters of 3 Commando Brigade and Royal Marines packing Albion “absolutely up to the gunnels” from her usual 340 souls to around 1,000 at the height of Cold Response.

Alongside landing support ship RFA
Mounts Bay, Albion leads the UK’s amphibious input into Cold Response, with “a significant level” of littoral strike operations – traditional-style commando raids – staged in the fjords, with the British force integrating with numerous allies, including the US, Norwegians, French, Germans and Italians.

“The UK has long had a very specific roll up in the high north in the Arctic. And it's all part of our routine development of that capability,” said Captain Simon Kelly, HMS
Albion’s Commanding Officer.

“Our ability to plug into and integrate into larger task groups is absolutely the core of all our capabilities, and it's that integration into the bigger piece of NATO, that collective ability which really brings the fighting edge to NATO.”

Royal Marines carry out fjord recce mission as huge Arctic exercises with NATO allies take shape - 3 March 22

Expert teams from 30 Commando Information Exploitation Group swam ashore and used inflatable raiding boats, before studying their surroundings to carefully calculate the best place for troops to land and hit an adversary decisively.

The commandos carried out this essential training in northern Norway to ensure that amphibious forces are able to access the rugged Arctic coastline when the Norwegian-led Exercise
Cold Response begins in earnest next week alongside a galvanised NATO effort for peace and stability in Europe.

Around 35,000 troops from 28 nations are expected to be involved in
Cold Response, which will show how a unified multilateral force would defend Norway and Europe’s northern flank from a modern adversary.

Roughly 900 Royal Marines will spearhead the UK involvement, raiding along the rugged Norwegian coastline from
an amphibious task group led by HMS Albion.

Aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales will deploy to the exercise, with frigate HMS Richmond, Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender, a Royal Fleet Auxiliary tanker and a nuclear-powered attack submarine escorting her.

UK Merlin and Wildcat helicopters will patrol the skies, supporting commando operations and hunting submarines alongside a wide range of aircraft from across NATO, including F-35 fighter jets and attack helicopters.

Reorganised
 

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