The Rising

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by jonwilly, Aug 20, 2005.

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  1. On the Beeb world service TV they are just reviewing the 'New ' Film The Rising about the Indian Mutiny. The director and a Indian historian are being interviewd and are having a good wriggle even admitting they have done a "Mal Gibson" on the history of events.
    I have not seened the film but the excepts seem very racist as does the movie. Er the Brit government put up some of the cash for the film.
    john
     
  2. Well quelle fcuking surprise. Post-Imperial Guilt - The Motion Picture. I'm actually a bit of an anorak with Victorian politics & colonial warfare, so I shall enjoy tearing it to pieces.

    Embolic of Edgeware
     
  3. The ballad of Mangal Pandey or Aamir khan's ego is just an excuse for the man to gain a second oscar nomination after Lagaan.

    Even before the first scene starts, the makers of the movie make quite clear that many of events in the movie (99.9% imo) have been created for dramatic effect, its Braveheart for the Indians. If you take the movie for Bollywood escapism, then it is rather good. RTFQ could even get some ideas for his dance offs. Do have to say I didn't particularly like the musical interludes in this flick.

    Since the movie celebrates a 'hero' who fought in 'The first war of Independence' (that’s Indian nationalism for you) Of course the Brits are the main villains in the movie, so of course there are some terrible British villains like Kenneth Cranham's character and vicious portrayals of the 'evils of colonialism': i.e. slavery, the economic exploitation of Indians and 'forced ' conversion.

    However saying that not all the Brits are bad in the movie, take for example the rather GINGER Toby Stephen's character of Captain William Gordon who happens to be Mangal Pandey best friend is probably the second most sympathetic character in the movie. The movie makes it quite clear that many of the Brits involved were just doing their jobs. However saying that, it has to be said that Stephen's character does often make rather inane comments about the evils of colonialism and the free market.

    But I guess you can't escape the fact that many who have no idea about Indian colonial history are going to see this movie and again think that it is a completely accurate representation of the events surrounding the 1857 uprising. :evil:

    Edited: Forgot to say I think the Arts Council contributed £150 K to it because this movie is supposed to be an east-west cross over i.e. the first Bollywood flick designed for both western and eastern audiences.
     
  4. When it’s all said and done we slapped that mutiny into the ground and ruled India for another century.