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NSP

LE
All your recommended reference/coffee table books for modelling subjects here, be it armour, aircraft or war canoe.

Picked this up in the TM shop. Lots of illustrations and colour plates, including spreads of interior detail shots and factoids. Begins in the beginning and works through in sections; both WWs, the CW, and contemporary conflicts into future concepts. Tanks, APCs, IFVs - the lot - all covered.

The Tank Book on Amazon

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NSP

LE
A mate bought me this (for some reason!) - the technical manual the Spams wrote after evaluating a captured 88:-

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Apart from being historically interesting to read there's lots of detail photos and illustrations, not only for the mount but the ancillary kit like the battery aiming solution computer unit and range-finder.

On Amazon.
 
Far East Armour.

Go to YouTube, Australian Army Tank Museum, Puckapunyal.
Not to big but all the Aussie vehicals are painted in their colour scheme's. They've got quite a mix of vehicals. Looking at the film, I counted at least 5 Matildas, one Matilda Scorpion, a dozer mark. Three Grants, four Centurions, a couple of Buffalo's one fire support version.
Enjoy.
Just a quick edit, had another look at video. They've also got a BARV, not 100% but looks to be based on a M3 or M4. There's also some Soviet kit as well.
 
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NSP

LE
Haynes are releasing a CVR(T) "manual" in the new year for those detail nuts that like making little models of little tanks*...

Amazon product



* Typed in a Oberleutnant Gruber accent.
 

NSP

LE
Treated myself to some more reading material to offset the lockdown blues.

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I bought them to feed my interests in military history and engineering but they'd make good references for modelling - the Haynes books are particularly well-stocked with colour plates; period photos - many in colour; development, technical, tactical and historical information, diagrams, cutaways and so on. The German Inf one is particularly good for figure modellers and if you are placing figures in, on or in diorama for your AFVs. Gives the Schutzstaffel a stiff ignoring, not surprisingly, but covers pretty much all branches of the WH from infantry through artillery to the loggies.

The CVR(T) book covers pretty much the full range of variants - mainly Scorpion but Scimitar, Spartan, Samaritan get chapters detailing their development, deployment and notable frontline historical events. The usual plethora of detailed photos, diagrams, schematics, etc. Ditto the D-Day book - which looks at the whole event from conception, planning, technical developments specifially for the invasion (the funnies and so on), Mulberry, breaking through the Wall, key figures and commanders on both sides - the lot. As a result it is notably thicker than most Haynes non-repair manuals - and they're printed on decent paper and not the blotting paper the car repair ones are printed on!

British Battle Tanks looks in alarming detail at the Cent', the Vickers MBTs, Chieftain and both Chally marques. Not so heavy on the photos but there there are lots of detailed colour plates showing the differences between variants, marques, paint schemes both within the British army and with export customers (such as Israeli Cent's). A hell of a lot of detailed technical and historical info in text form, though. I'm going to enjoy a good read with that one.

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Expecting this one tomorrow:-
Amazon product
I wonder if David is any relation to noted German armour historian Hilary Doyle...?
 
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