The Re-dedication of the Basra Memorial Wall: Video Footage

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by RachelC, Mar 12, 2010.

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  1. Hi all,

    I thought that some of you might be interested in seeing some video footage from a special service that took place yesterday at the National Memorial Arboretum.

    It was the re-dedication of the Basra Memorial Wall - a monument that honours the memory of all UK forces and coalition personnel who lost their lives on operations in Iraq between 2003 and 2009.

    Following the end of combat operations, the wall was dismantled and faced a future of ruin. But Carol Jones, mother of Sergant John Jones who was killed while serving in Iraq, continuously lobbied the Government for three years until they agreed to re-build the wall brick-by-brick at the Arboretum.

    It's a wonderfully inspiring story and the video is quite moving. Do take a look if you can!

    If you'd like to find out more about the Wall you can also head over to LegionLive.



    Poppy
     
  2. Now that is strange....when I played that, it installed a program on my laptop that blew dust into my eyes right when The Last Post was played.


    Is it just me, or does that wall bear no resemblance to the red and yellow brick and mortar wall that stood in Basra. Unless the original brick wall was rebuilt and then faced in marble??
     
  3. To me it does look the same. Dimensions look spot on.

    The original bricks used would not last long in our UK climate as they were very porous. Look at the state of the roads after this winter.

    I'm led to beleive the original bricks have been used somewere in the construction of this memorial.

    Cheers for the link RachelC :D
     
  4. Sorry, I failed to articulate myself adequately. I can see that your point is valid, I was referring to the bricks themselves and the way that some reports suggest that the wall was re-assembled in UK using the very same bricks that came from Basra in exactly the same format.

    I appreciate you clearing that up :)

    Either way, the memorial plaques are the really important bits and I am glad to see that they have found a permanent home where respects can be paid.

    In fact, I think I will take myself up there for a day out next week and have a period of quiet reflection and contemplation.
     
  5. Most of the original bricks were too broken to use after the original wall came down so they're in the foundations. Those good enough to reuse were built into the Wall above the flood level (it can flood there) and the inner core was then clad with a brickish coloured marble. A v emotional day.
     
  6. I know it is not youf faul but 50 seconds download for 5 seconds of viewing does tend to spoil the effect.
     
  7. Sorry, I failed to articulate myself adequately. I can see that your point is valid, I was referring to the bricks themselves and the way that some reports suggest that the wall was re-assembled in UK using the very same bricks that came from Basra in exactly the same format.

    I appreciate you clearing that up :)

    Either way, the memorial plaques are the really important bits and I am glad to see that they have found a permanent home where respects can be paid.

    In fact, I think I will take myself up there for a day out next week and have a period of quiet reflection and contemplation.[/quote]

    you will need more than a day to go round it all... go to see the "shot at dawn" site... that hits... the boy on the stake is 17...