The Queens Shilling

#1
I remember when I joined the British Army that we had to accept the Queen's Shilling.
In the meantime, things have changed and the old adage " a bob for the job" seems to be outdated (not the least reason being because the UK has gone decimal in the meatime).
So how do they do that nowadays when recruits sign on the dotted line and are sworn in?

MsG
 
#4
You were lucky. July 61 got 12/6d (63p) plus bus fares. Mother took the lot (think me dad had steak that night). Tell the young uns that now and they wont believe you.
 
G

Goku

Guest
#5
I got bugger all when I joined.
I’m going to have words with my PASO next time I see him, I think he now owes me 5p
 
#7
General Melchett said:
I signed an acquitance roll (didn't know at the time) for one days pay. Plus about £2 for the taxi.

......if only I'd known then what I know now.......(
now that is a blast from the past but should'nt it be 2 Ts
 
#8
General Melchett said:
I signed an acquitance roll (didn't know at the time) for one days pay. Plus about £2 for the taxi.

......if only I'd known then what I know now.......(
now that is a blast from the past but should'nt it be 2 Ts
 
#11
Thanks for all the helpful answers, lads. I was also wondering if it'd be possible to knock up some "bob" replicas and hand them to new recruits as a sort of memento. I mean, with all the money they waste on duff kit, surely that wouldn't break the bank, would it?

MsG
 
#12
Shillin' a day,
Bloomin' good pay-
Lucky to touch it, a shillin' a day!

6/8d (which I think was the rate for a days ration allowance back then) for me 'though I was also given "The Queen's shilling" and a bible!
 

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