The Queens Commission

#1
Has anybody read 'the Queen's commission', a document provided on the homepage of the RMAS website.

If that isn't enough to spell out the role of an officer and inspire people to want officership I don't know what will.
 
#4
He means he has the Queen's Commission he was awarded on successful completion of his course at Sandhurst - not the guide book you refer to. Your other posts lead me to believe this is not a wah.
 
#5
Mr_C_Hinecap said:
He means he has the Queen's Commission he was awarded on successful completion of his course at Sandhurst - not the guide book you refer to. Your other posts lead me to believe this is not a wah.
Yes I thought it was that he meant. Course a lowly wannabe like me doesn't have one (yet!). Anyway, having been accustomed to the term "wah" I can see why this thread might be seen as one, or an attempt at one, but I genuinely think the guide is a really good read.
 
#6
Krankenschwester said:
What, like the certificate article or the document? If it's the document, is it like wallpaper I presume?
Its like parchment about 20" x 15" and signed by Elizabeth R and some bloke called Blacker - and its getting old like its owner :(
 
#7
I could swear it's been out for a few years now. If I had to pick one part that sums up what makes British officers unique, it's this earlier indicator of the calibre of men to follow:

For officers of this period, the army meant active service
throughout an ever expanding empire. Being able to ride and
shoot, and understand and map terrain, were essential attributes
when campaigning against the Ashanti, the Zulus, the Matabele,
the Dervishes and the Afghans. To a much greater extent than the
officers of other armies, the British officer developed the ability to
operate independently on detachment, displaying initiative of a
quite exceptional kind. Sometimes it was taken to extremes.
When Wolseley refused to allow a young Cyprus based engineer
officer, Herbert Horatio Kitchener, to accompany his
expeditionary force to Egypt in 1881, Kitchener took leave,
disguised himself as a Lebanese businessman (he had already
taught himself Arabic) and, travelling to Alexandria in advance of
the invasion, occupied himself sketching Egyptian defences. In
their own expansion into central Asia, the Russians kept
encountering young British officers on leave, disguised as
Turkmen or Kazakh tribesmen, while other British officers
delighted in impersonating Pathans on the North West frontier.
The sons and grandsons of these men would ride with TE
Lawrence across the Hejaz, or shoot up Rommel’s airfields with
the Long Range Desert Group and the SAS.
As here's the worst of British, although surely rare these days:
But with the exception of a few anti-social swots like Major JFC Fuller and Lieutenant Bernard Montgomery, it was generally considered
bad form to discuss professional matters in the mess.
 
#9
*first post*

Im 16 and hopefully on my way to Welbeck dsfc in September (AOSB in March), I was recommended to read this before going to the AOSB, Im hacking my way through it but I was just wondering if any of you know where I could get hold of this in paperback or possibly hardback?

Thanks in advance, Auden
 
#10
JFC Fuller? a man who wasn't just interested in blitzkrieg but also in Nazism?
 

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