THE PUTIN PLAN TO SUCKER AMERICA

#1
http://www.nypost.com/seven/0225200...s/the_putin_plan_to_sucker_america_156757.htm

THE toughest challenge Americans face in dealing with Vladimir Putin's Russia is that we insist on complicating the obvious. Putin's schemes are plain as day, but we insist on polishing up his motives.

Recently, Prime Minister Putin bribed the Kyrgyz government to shut down US access to the Manas air base, which is crucial to sustaining NATO's efforts in Afghanistan. Simultaneously, Moscow offered us a lengthy caravan route through Russia and its Central Asian client states to make up for the loss of Manas.

The strategy couldn't be more straightforward: With our main supply route through Pakistan increasingly threatened, Putin wants to addict us to an alternative under his direct control.
...
Putin figures that, faced with a choice between Georgia's death as an independent state and the loss of our new main supply route for Afghanistan, we'd grumble but opt to keep the logistics flowing.
...
The Russians whom we meet, then describe as "friends," are thoroughly coached in advance by the GRU (military intelligence) or the FSB (the eternal KGB). A Russian general or diplo-huckster sitting across the table from one of our reps has been carefully schooled on which buttons to press to win at "con the gringo."

Today, we have no strategy for dealing with Putin's Russia. None. And our lame responses to Putin's provocations increasingly seem "made in Europe."

One minor example among many: At the close of last summer's war of aggression against tiny, democratic Georgia, the Russian military seized US Marine Corps equipment that was on the docks awaiting shipment home after an exercise. The Russians refused to give the gear back. And we rolled over.
...
Russia can be our ally in specific cases, but will never be our friend. Why? Because Russians don't want to be friends.
...
Better to leave Afghanistan than to leave our soldiers at Moscow's mercy.
So who has written it?

Ralph Peters is a former army officer who wasted too much of his life studying the Russians.
Ahhh... an intelligence officer and no doubt a 'sincere friend' of Russia.

Edit to add. It appears that I'm right

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Peters

He spent ten years in Germany working in military intelligence.
...
Peters later became a Foreign Area Officer, specializing in the Soviet Union. He attended the Command and General Staff College. His last assignment was to the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence.
Mr.Peters has interesting view:

There will be no peace. At any given moment for the rest of our lifetimes, there will be multiple conflicts in mutating forms around the globe. Violent conflict will dominate the headlines, but cultural and economic struggles will be steadier and ultimately more decisive. The de facto role of the US armed forces will be to keep the world safe for our economy and open to our cultural assault. To those ends, we will do a fair amount of killing.
... ant those sly Russians don't want to be our friends...
 
#2
As my Grandmother used to say, 'never trust a Bolshevik!!'
 
#4
Ah, right so an Intelligence officer has no right to express an opinion on a subject directly related to his job then? Or do you think FSB agents giving briefings to putin & Medvedev should be ignored because they're possibly biased against America? It may not be the Cold War but theres been geopolitical competition between Russia and the West for centuries, the Cold War was nothing new and this is just back to business as normal...
 
S

Screw_The_Nut

Guest
#5
THE toughest challenge Americans face in dealing with Vladimir Putin's Russia is that we insist on complicating the obvious. Putin's schemes are plain as day, but we insist on polishing up his motives.

Recently, Prime Minister Putin bribed the Kyrgyz government to shut down US access to the Manas air base, which is crucial to sustaining NATO's efforts in Afghanistan. Simultaneously, Moscow offered us a lengthy caravan route through Russia and its Central Asian client states to make up for the loss of Manas.

The strategy couldn't be more straightforward: With our main supply route through Pakistan increasingly threatened, Putin wants to addict us to an alternative under his direct control.
...
Putin figures that, faced with a choice between Georgia's death as an independent state and the loss of our new main supply route for Afghanistan, we'd grumble but opt to keep the logistics flowing.
...
The Russians whom we meet, then describe as "friends," are thoroughly coached in advance by the GRU (military intelligence) or the FSB (the eternal KGB). A Russian general or diplo-huckster sitting across the table from one of our reps has been carefully schooled on which buttons to press to win at "con the gringo."

Today, we have no strategy for dealing with Putin's Russia. None. And our lame responses to Putin's provocations increasingly seem "made in Europe."

One minor example among many: At the close of last summer's war of aggression against tiny, democratic Georgia, the Russian military seized US Marine Corps equipment that was on the docks awaiting shipment home after an exercise. The Russians refused to give the gear back. And we rolled over.
...
Russia can be our ally in specific cases, but will never be our friend. Why? Because Russians don't want to be friends.
...
Better to leave Afghanistan than to leave our soldiers at Moscow's mercy.
Yet another ****ing yank, with his own agenda and primitive and blinkered views of the world... what a fecking surprise!

We should just all nuke USA and rid the world of these wingeing, weak and pathetic losers. *end of rant.
 
#6
Screw_The_Nut said:
THE toughest challenge Americans face in dealing with Vladimir Putin's Russia is that we insist on complicating the obvious. Putin's schemes are plain as day, but we insist on polishing up his motives.

Recently, Prime Minister Putin bribed the Kyrgyz government to shut down US access to the Manas air base, which is crucial to sustaining NATO's efforts in Afghanistan. Simultaneously, Moscow offered us a lengthy caravan route through Russia and its Central Asian client states to make up for the loss of Manas.

The strategy couldn't be more straightforward: With our main supply route through Pakistan increasingly threatened, Putin wants to addict us to an alternative under his direct control.
...
Putin figures that, faced with a choice between Georgia's death as an independent state and the loss of our new main supply route for Afghanistan, we'd grumble but opt to keep the logistics flowing.
...
The Russians whom we meet, then describe as "friends," are thoroughly coached in advance by the GRU (military intelligence) or the FSB (the eternal KGB). A Russian general or diplo-huckster sitting across the table from one of our reps has been carefully schooled on which buttons to press to win at "con the gringo."

Today, we have no strategy for dealing with Putin's Russia. None. And our lame responses to Putin's provocations increasingly seem "made in Europe."

One minor example among many: At the close of last summer's war of aggression against tiny, democratic Georgia, the Russian military seized US Marine Corps equipment that was on the docks awaiting shipment home after an exercise. The Russians refused to give the gear back. And we rolled over.
...
Russia can be our ally in specific cases, but will never be our friend. Why? Because Russians don't want to be friends.
...
Better to leave Afghanistan than to leave our soldiers at Moscow's mercy.
Yet another * yank, with his own agenda and primitive and blinkered views of the world... what a fecking surprise!

We should just all nuke USA and rid the world of these wingeing, weak and pathetic losers. *end of rant.
LOL! You accuse the yanks of having a primitive view of the world and then say that! Oh the irony!
 
S

Screw_The_Nut

Guest
#7
I'm just fecking sick of Americans with their HUGE chip on their shoulders, having a go at Russia and Europe every time they don't get their way. Going on and on about the new cold war and how Putin is trying to "screw" them. Get a fecking grip.... :x
 
#8
Bradstyley said:
Ah, right so an Intelligence officer has no right to express an opinion on a subject directly related to his job then?
He has this right of course. Moreover, I see his opinion as interestring and worth to be discussed.

Bradstyley said:
Or do you think FSB agents giving briefings to putin & Medvedev...
these two dwarves? Second one is no more that a statist.

Bradstyley said:
... should be ignored because they're possibly biased against America? It may not be the Cold War but theres been geopolitical competition between Russia and the West for centuries, the Cold War was nothing new and this is just back to business as normal...
I agree with many points, even with this perl

Russia can be our ally in specific cases, but will never be our friend. Why? Because Russians don't want to be friends.
However, I would like to hold another question. Why the Russians don't want to be friends? Maybe because the Americans don't want to be friends as well?
 
#9
I love unbiased, impartial articles like this. The Ivans want the Septics out of their backyard. That seems fairy nuff to me. I wonder how the Septics would react if the Ivans established an airbase in Mexico.

This was also interesting:
One minor example among many: At the close of last summer's war of aggression against tiny, democratic Georgia, the Russian military seized US Marine Corps equipment that was on the docks awaiting shipment home after an exercise. The Russians refused to give the gear back. And we rolled over.
It was the Georgians who kicked off the war in the first place, thinking that the Septics would pitch in. And Georgia is anything but democratic. In addition, the Septic kit that was seized was actually being imported, not exported, and was meant for the Georgian army. That's why the Ivans nicked it - spoils of war.

I get the impression that the Septics still haven't managed to shake off their Cold War mindset (and their delusions of grandeur).

MsG
 
S

Screw_The_Nut

Guest
#10
KGB_resident said:
Russia can be our ally in specific cases, but will never be our friend. Why? Because Russians don't want to be friends.
However, I would like to hold another question. Why the Russians don't want to be friends? Maybe because the Americans don't want to be friends as well?
Because the americans are weapons grade arsseholes? And the russians are obviously bright enough to recognise this fact.
 
#11
Drlligaf said:
You know a lot about int, don't you Sergei? :wink:
Me? I'm absolutely unexperienced on these matters. :D
 
#12
Bugsy said:
I love unbiased, impartial articles like this. The Ivans want the Septics out of their backyard. That seems fairy nuff to me. I wonder how the Septics would react if the Ivans established an airbase in Mexico.

This was also interesting:
One minor example among many: At the close of last summer's war of aggression against tiny, democratic Georgia, the Russian military seized US Marine Corps equipment that was on the docks awaiting shipment home after an exercise. The Russians refused to give the gear back. And we rolled over.
It was the Georgians who kicked off the war in the first place, thinking that the Septics would pitch in. And Georgia is anything but democratic. In addition, the Septic kit that was seized was actually being imported, not exported, and was meant for the Georgian army. That's why the Ivans nicked it - spoils of war.

I get the impression that the Septics still haven't managed to shake off their Cold War mindset (and their delusions of grandeur).

MsG
So what about Cuba then? :?
 
#13
To quote one Simpson, Bart on such matters ... "Well, duh!"

One strand of US foreign policy, whether they admit to it or not, is to keep Europe divided so it cannot emerge as a competitor. In crude terms this means keeping Russia outside NATO and the EU. Hence the post Cold War willingness in Washington to surround the Rodina with vengeful nations and help them settle old scores - sorry, I meant free democratic countries, who just happen to have ABM radars.

Nice idea, but the utter stupidity of US foreign policy post 9/11 has rather kicked the legs out from under it. To succeed in Iraq and draw down they need Iran to co-operate, although you'll rarely hear them admit this. And that means they need Russia to stop stirring the pot. Again, in Afghanistan they have to face the reality that keeping supply lines open to AFG as Pakistan implodes requires Russia on side. And then there's India, all the 'stans ... it all comes back to Russia.

The recent Munich conference was the US talking tough - and lo and behold, Iran go ahead and "commission" a reactor. If the US push, Russia will push back and in a manner that will really hurt the US. Imagine if a few modern MANPADS ended up in AFG ? I bet there's a good few afghantsi in the Russian Army begging for some payback.

The author is correct, the US has no idea how to deal with Russia as the US has been stupid enough to back themselves into a corner.
 
#14
Ord_Sgt said:
Bugsy said:
I love unbiased, impartial articles like this. The Ivans want the Septics out of their backyard. That seems fairy nuff to me. I wonder how the Septics would react if the Ivans established an airbase in Mexico.

This was also interesting:
One minor example among many: At the close of last summer's war of aggression against tiny, democratic Georgia, the Russian military seized US Marine Corps equipment that was on the docks awaiting shipment home after an exercise. The Russians refused to give the gear back. And we rolled over.
It was the Georgians who kicked off the war in the first place, thinking that the Septics would pitch in. And Georgia is anything but democratic. In addition, the Septic kit that was seized was actually being imported, not exported, and was meant for the Georgian army. That's why the Ivans nicked it - spoils of war.

I get the impression that the Septics still haven't managed to shake off their Cold War mindset (and their delusions of grandeur).

MsG
So what about Cuba then? :?
But even then, in the Sixties, Cuba was some 90 miles from the US, Ord_ Sarge. I mean a military airbase about ten clicks from the Texas border on Mexican soil, and then watch how the Septics get really twitchy.

They don't like it up 'em! :D

What really pisses me off about the Septics at times is that they've no mind to listen to any criticism AT ALL! Even if it's constructive.

MsG
 

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