The police farce.

Helm

MIA
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1982 or 83, I was still a probby.
The 1984 legislation came about after an enquiry found that many undertakers and mortuary staff were making money off the dead. Theft of clothing and watches and jewellery from the deceased, organs, prosthetics for re-sale. Even pathologists and coroners were getting cash from it.
There was something about displaying body parts, in another legislation. Offhand I can't recall which it was, but as they were in a private house and not on public display I can't see that working either. The stated case involved somebody showing a passenger, a skull in a railway carriage.
 

TamH70

MIA
They didn't hide behind OSA? (Senior management knew about a post office raid in New Addington before it happened, but sat on it... RIP PS Derek Robertson… OSA got wheeled out along with doubts about the source, who was solid.)
The Wapping Riot was similar, mounted and Level 2 DSUs in the rear, SPG in raincoats and beat helmets stood at the front, no shields, collecting bricks, bottles, and cast iron railing spikes.
There were two Joneses that night, DAC Wynn Jones (The only man in the Met with a wooly pully, brought it with him from Thames Valley... took it with him into early retirement shortly after when it became known he received all expenses paid luxury holidays from a villain.)
Ch Supt Ron Jones A9 (SPG).

DAC Jones did nothing, even when PCs and WPCs were getting brained, so the junior Jones uttered some choice words in his radio to the senior Jones before switching it off, drawing his stick, and leading a charge he had requested, but senior Jones had denied. Chased them all the way down The Highway, and they didn't come back that night. Most fun I'd had in ages , ended up with some 1, 3 and 8 Unit officers (I was 4 Unit) for a couple of hours until we were relieved.
You failed to mention Wyn Jones's subsequent trial, conviction, and sentence for shoplifting from Marks and Sparks...

So I thought I might as well...


 
You failed to mention Wyn Jones's subsequent trial, conviction, and sentence for shoplifting from Marks and Sparks...

So I thought I might as well...


"In March 1994, Jones was forcibly detained by a store detective and security guard who accused him of shoplifting chicken breasts, cheese and two bottles of wine worth £24 from a branch of Marks & Spencer on the King's Road near his home in Belgravia, despite having £1,700 in cash on him. He was convicted of theft by a jury on 11 April 1995 and fined £400."

Yep, a wrong-un
 
There was something about displaying body parts, in another legislation. Offhand I can't recall which it was, but as they were in a private house and not on public display I can't see that working either. The stated case involved somebody showing a passenger, a skull in a railway carriage.
I thought that was Gibbets and carnival displays, but that was just my assumption as I really don't think it was something I was taught at training school.
 
"In March 1994, Jones was forcibly detained by a store detective and security guard who accused him of shoplifting chicken breasts, cheese and two bottles of wine worth £24 from a branch of Marks & Spencer on the King's Road near his home in Belgravia, despite having £1,700 in cash on him. He was convicted of theft by a jury on 11 April 1995 and fined £400."

Yep, a wrong-un
When he was DAC he was apparently allowing the Commissioners launch which was berthed at Wapping to be used for parties by business contacts of his wife.
 
Religious beliefs ( rolls eyes)

We had a Chinese FME, force medical examiner ( a GP who gets paid to be called out to examine persons in custody and to pronounce 'life extinct') This one would not touch a body that was cold, even with latex gloves (which were all but the ones in rooms with the heating on.... which tended to be smelly) At a Sudd Death I lied because I had other things to do besides sit next to a deceased all day. I have no idea what she called me when she touched the body but I am sure it was not complimentary, and it went on for over a minute with hardly a pause for breath or variance of volume, quite impressive, she missed her calling as an RSM.

My late father was one of those.

Originally they were called ‘police surgeons’, and the title was changed to ‘forensic medical officers‘ to make it sound more neutral.

Whilst dad would’ve done his examinations in a professional and neutral manner, the desk sergeant and colleagues had no doubt where his loyalties lay!

Only once, in his 60s, did a prisoner assault him – blackeye, bit of facial blood drawn.

The desk sergeant, and his mates, exacted suitable retribution – there was no subsequent re-examination…
 
1982 or 83, I was still a probby.
The 1984 legislation came about after an enquiry found that many undertakers and mortuary staff were making money off the dead. Theft of clothing and watches and jewellery from the deceased, organs, prosthetics for re-sale. Even pathologists and coroners were getting cash from it.

There was also an incident around that time where two likely lads stole a corpse from a Hospital. I think the story was they wanted to frighten a mate by leaving the body in his car. ISTR it was Barnsley.

They were only charged with stealing the shroud/body bag. As you say, there was no offence in taking the body. I think this came from the concept of ownership - i.e. nobody can "own" another person, dead or alive, so a corpse can't be anyone's property. AIUI the state has ultimate responsibility for disposal, but that doesn't imply ownership.
 
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One of London's finest on his way to his gross misconduct hearing.
Met Officer shared 'Golliwog Meghan Markle meme' tribunal told

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There was also an incident around that time where two likely lads stole a corpse from a Hospital. I think the story was they wanted to frighten a mate by leaving the body in his car. ISTR it was Barnsley.

They were only charged with stealing the shroud/body bag. As you say, there was no offence in taking the body. I think this came from the concept of ownership - i.e. nobody can "own" another person, dead or alive, so a corpse can't be anyone's property. AIUI the state has ultimate responsibility for disposal, but that doesn't imply ownership.
If it was the same one. It was a clan warfare incident. They had killed/ or he just died him. As the other clan was mourning him, said chappy turned up via the window
 

Chef

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