The Paras: Men of War - New ITV Series

NAAFI answer - y'all just sit back and have a nice day, maybe rock up at the last moment and cover yourselves in glory.

Sensible answer - did you actually watch the programme in question? Being totally honest here, when I first heard of "milling" it seemed horrifying. But that's because I have the mindset of an old biddy. For fit young men, it shouldn't be much of a problem..

Out of interest, how does the US military train their infantry in close combat?
I scared the shite out of my opponent in the milling.






















He thought he had fecking killed me
 
Most of us learned how to duck in high school!!

You haven't been listening, have you. You're not meant to duck, but to endure.
 
You haven't been listening, have you. You're not meant to duck, but to endure.
I hear what you say, it’s a very interesting endurance test and I will keep it mind. Some things are just viewed differently across the pond. But with the greatest respect, it’s your system not mine.
 
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The Afgan chap who was backsquaded could present a huge security risk if he makes the grade.
Tv footage of the character praying before P company made me ponder our Armed Forces ethos....

Are we the British Army or the BBC PC renegades...
If the chap passes I’m sure he’ll fit in in 2para 3para etc...
Yeah, you’re right, maybe the Army should start checking people’s background. Write to your MP immediately.

YOU can stop terror on our streets :eek:
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
I had never boxed or had a fight until basic training 'millimg'. I was up against a slightly smaller guy, but he was an absolute hard nut. I was totally shittinh myself. As we closed for the first punch I shut my eyes and stuck my fist out.........he had come at me so fast he went straight into it, out for the count. Never had a problem after that :D
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Slight diversion, but gen question.

Jonesy mentioned "ground fighting" - I guess the closest thing over here would be formal Judo training. I know the British Army used to encourage Judo as a sport (presumably optional), but is it still routinely practiced, or is there not time and resources for that sort of luxury these days??
 
And anyway, when they jump with kit, the bigger the bloke, the smaller the container.
In my generation the personal height : weight ratio was enforced. This was due to the 'height' of the aircraft door and the weight relative to the opening 'shock' that the canopy could absorb without tearing on deployment in a worse case scenario.

This 'All up Weight' (AUW) that is - body weight + operational load weight + main canopy weight + reserve canopy weight were governed by the 'weight' a reserve canopy's opening could absorb.

Tall gents exiting from a DC3 / Andover. / Argosy doors felt as though they needed to squat a bit down in order to prevent banging your helmet on the door top. With a 75lb load clipped onto the harness front, it made for a very unstable entry into a 110kts in some instances, slipstream hence the height limitation in those days.

As @spaz has remarked, the pie eaters got away with handbag loads while the skinnies were honoured with the mortars, base plates, gpmg's in sf mode besides the specialist rubber boat types with the outboard motors et al.

Ramp exits and developments in parachute design changed the height / weight parameters , besides the very obvious variety of aircraft now cleared for para sorties
 
Slight diversion, but gen question.

Jonesy mentioned "ground fighting" - I guess the closest thing over here would be formal Judo training. I know the British Army used to encourage Judo as a sport (presumably optional), but is it still routinely practiced, or is there not time and resources for that sort of luxury these days??
I heard that the RM teach a sort of Judo / Jujitsu sort of thing.
 
Did anyone else laugh when the 17 yr old wanted to transfer out?

"So you want a transfer, where to?"

"The Rifles Corporal"

"The fcuking Rifles, Haha..haha..OK Fcuk Off"

Then the others join in: "Go on then.. Fcuk Off"

I laughed then I felt bad for the kid, at least he tried and wasn't asking to leave the Army altogether, nice to see him get the 'Top Recruit' award from the Rifles though.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
I laughed then I felt bad for the kid, at least he tried and wasn't asking to leave the Army altogether, nice to see him get the 'Top Recruit' award from the Rifles though.
It actually said that he ended up transferring to the R. Anglians, so he either changed his mind about the Rifles or wasn't accepted by them. Either way, he obviously did well for himself.
 
Not much needed to add to Alecs post.
From an earlier comment (which was touched on here,) smaller blokes carrying heavier loads did not smack in harder on landing.
Because the load was dropped below you on a rope, as soon as it hit the ground you , above it, instantly slowed a bit.

Wind speed was the biggest factor in hard landings.
 

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