The Most Heavy Stroke. The Battle Of Roundway Down 1643.

The Most Heavy Stroke. The Battle Of Roundway Down 1643.

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#1
JINGO submitted a new resource:

The Most Heavy Stroke. The Battle Of Roundway Down 1643. - Sir WIlliam Waller called his defeat at the Battle Of Roundway Down, the most heavy Stroke.

The Most Heavy Stroke. The Battle Of Roundway Down 1643. Chris Scott.

The English Civil War is somewhat of a mystery to me I am embarrassed to say. I have vague images in my head from childhood history lessons of “Roundheads” and Cavaliers. It is with some discomfort then that I had my comfortable recollections rapidly turned to dust in the first few pages by a man of Dr Chris Scott, the authors very evident wealth of knowledge and passion for the period.

This book is an in depth...
Read more about this resource...
 
#2
The best thing is that Roundway Down and Olivers Castle can be visited. I used to run out of Devizes, along the old London to Bath coach road - which is now basically a track - and then run up Olivers castle.

Plenty to do along there if you are minded: Avebury is not far, neither are the burial long barrow and Silbury hill, with stretches of Roman road and white horses around the area too.
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#3
The best thing is that Roundway Down and Olivers Castle can be visited. I used to run out of Devizes, along the old London to Bath coach road - which is now basically a track - and then run up Olivers castle.

Plenty to do along there if you are minded: Avebury is not far, neither are the burial long barrow and Silbury hill, with stretches of Roman road and white horses around the area too.
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#4
Thank you for the Effendi. I must admit that reading the book has quite piqued my interest in looking over the ground myself. This could be the year!
 
#5
Thank you for the Effendi. I must admit that reading the book has quite piqued my interest in looking over the ground myself. This could be the year!
Most Civil War battlefields are a) fairly well defined b) accessible on foot. The big exceptions are Newbury 2 where a large part is now a housing estate and Edgehill, which is in the hands of the MoD. That said parts of Newbury are still farmland you can walk and you can get a very good view of Edgehill from the ridge so it's easy to work out what happened roughly where. I'd rceommend anyone who lives vaguely nearby to find your local battlefields and have a look.
 
#6
Oliver's Castle is a Paragliding Launch site. It's pretty technical and is only suitable for those that are 'Pilot' rated due to the lack of bottom landing field.

Apropos of bugger all.
 
#7
JINGO submitted a new resource:

The Most Heavy Stroke. The Battle Of Roundway Down 1643. - Sir WIlliam Waller called his defeat at the Battle Of Roundway Down, the most heavy Stroke.



Read more about this resource...
Thanks for that @JINGO . I like you are lacking in English civil war knowledge and it's about time I started to rectify that fact.

The National Archives | Civil War | Why did people want the king back in 1646? | Key people & events

Historians think that about 180,000 people died from fighting, accidents and disease. That was about 3.6% of the population. (In World War 1 around 2.6% of the population died).

It was a very significant event in English history and has shaped our country ever since. maybe this book will start me on a journey of discovery!?
 
#8
Oliver's Castle is a Paragliding Launch site. It's pretty technical and is only suitable for those that are 'Pilot' rated due to the lack of bottom landing field.

Apropos of bugger all.
Plenty of 'unofficial' launch sites around that area back in the early days, what with the nutters in Marlborough more or less kicking off hang gliding in the UK. Up by Barbury Castle, just outside Wroughton used to be a favourite spot............and did someone say Silbury Hill at very early o'clock?

Barbury Castle is right next to the Ridgeway, good place to go for a wander, it's an old iron age fort/fortified village.
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#9
Thanks for that @JINGO . I like you are lacking in English civil war knowledge and it's about time I started to rectify that fact.

The National Archives | Civil War | Why did people want the king back in 1646? | Key people & events

Historians think that about 180,000 people died from fighting, accidents and disease. That was about 3.6% of the population. (In World War 1 around 2.6% of the population died).

It was a very significant event in English history and has shaped our country ever since. maybe this book will start me on a journey of discovery!?
The book is excellent. It does have a very brief potted history at the start, but in itself is quite focused on this single battle. I’m afraid I cannot recommend a broader history as quite clearly I haven’t read any
 
#11
Plenty of 'unofficial' launch sites around that area back in the early days, what with the nutters in Marlborough more or less kicking off hang gliding in the UK. Up by Barbury Castle, just outside Wroughton used to be a favourite spot............and did someone say Silbury Hill at very early o'clock?

Barbury Castle is right next to the Ridgeway, good place to go for a wander, it's an old iron age fort/fortified village.
Barbury Castle is often associated with er, 'other' activities these days I'm sorry to say......
 
#13
Barbury Castle is often associated with er, 'other' activities these days I'm sorry to say......
<cough> Really!<cough> Couldn't possibly imagine it going on back then, no siree, particularly not after a night out in the Old Town.
 
#14
Plenty of 'unofficial' launch sites around that area back in the early days, what with the nutters in Marlborough more or less kicking off hang gliding in the UK. Up by Barbury Castle, just outside Wroughton used to be a favourite spot............and did someone say Silbury Hill at very early o'clock?

Barbury Castle is right next to the Ridgeway, good place to go for a wander, it's an old iron age fort/fortified village.
Some of those nutters (the few that weren't killed!) taught me hang gliding at the Wiltshire HG school in the 80's. The school was run by a former RAF pilot who was something of a chancer: Tony G came unstuck when an authorised modification to a Moyes HG caused a stall and the subsequent death of a trainee pilot.
We flew various hills around the Vale of the White horse: Milk, Tan, Golden ball, Liddington (another fortification similar to Barbury) and Sugar Hill, to name but a few.

In the late 90's one of the hazards of flying Combe Gibbet was the real danger of one the aforementioned nutters Mike Hibbert, flying his Paraglider right at you, close enough to see the gap in the grinning idiots teeth. The normal form was to both break right and he sometimes did.

The last time I flew at Combe, in 2014, a flying buddy (ex-21) crashed in front of me and was killed - Hibbert was not involved.
 

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