The media and Covid-19: making a bad situation worse

Here's a very good article from The Guardian on the societal impact of CV19. I commend people read it.

If you class that as a "very good" article, you have a reading age of seven.

It was another ham-fisted windmill at "Tory cuts" sprinkled with cynical schmaltz about how people are coping.

It missed including itself on the list of things that aren't important.
 

Yokel

LE
If you class that as a "very good" article, you have a reading age of seven.

It was another ham-fisted windmill at "Tory cuts" sprinkled with cynical schmaltz about how people are coping.

It missed including itself on the list of things that aren't important.
This would never have happened if parent companies of major newspapers had nor set up offshore so as to avoid paying tax. They still ask the reader for donations though.

Do as we say, not as we do...?

Soft, strong, and throughly absorbent.
 
Just realised today, you could also have the Wu-Han Clan and their debut album, Enter the Wuhan (36 Isolation Chambers).

Boredom is starting to kick in.
Thread drift:
They are already on the festival line up
 
Sky bint ?trott? Saying that govt expected to relax things in next few days. Review, you airhead, REVIEW !
For once the Welsh Government have done something I agree with. They've unilaterally extended our lockdown by one week, initially and reviewing weekly thereafter, I believe.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

rifleair

War Hero
Cut and paste from the guardian, if you take all the bollocks out if the middle then it reads a little better!


“There are decades where nothing happens; and there are weeks where decades happen.”

So said Vladimir Ilyich Lenin of the ferment of revolution, but he could just as easily have been talking about the 100 days that have passed since the moment coronavirus officially became a global phenomenon, the day China reported the new contagion to the World Health Organization.

The world has been transformed in that time, perhaps nowhere more so than Britain.

A hundred days ago, on 31 December, the UK prime minister delivered a video message full of hope and promise.

The coming year would, he said, be a “fantastic” one, the start of “an exhilarating decade of growth, prosperity and opportunity”. In 2020, he enthused, Britain would brim with “confidence"

The early weeks suggested the PM might be right on one count at least. After three and a half years of rancour over Brexit, some of the poison began to drain out of the issue. Of course, it wasn’t “done”, as Johnson promised it would be, but it seemed as if we might dwell on lesser worries.

We saw in 2020 debating Megxit, a country with no greater angst on its mind than whether the Sussexes should carry on royalling.

On 31 January, the UK formally left the European Union. This new coronavirus was low down on the bulletins, safely tagged as foreign news.

Even by early March, it had not quite bared its teeth. People knew the official advice but weren’t sure quite how seriously they were meant to take it. Those politicians involved in public health messaging might attempt an awkward elbow bump at the start of a meeting, only to end it with a handshake or even a bear hug.

Johnson himself, at a press conference on 3 March, cheerfully boasted that he was still shaking hands with people he met – including, he said, people infected with coronavirus.

And yet, after a couple of those weeks in which decades happen, on 23 March Johnson was delivering a TV address to the nation, announcing a lockdown in what might have been a hackneyed scene from dystopian fiction. The pubs were closed, along with the football grounds and the cinemas and the theatres and the schools. Places that normally throb with noise were suddenly quiet and have remained so.


You can jog through Leicester Square, London, a place normally teeming with tourists, and hear nothing more than the flapping of a distant flag.

Two weeks on from that original edict and now the death toll is in the thousands with the prime minister himself in intensive care, a development that shook people who did not expect to be shaken. Decades, in weeks.

This is a story of change so rapid, we can barely absorb it.

People focus on the questions that are human scale and therefore digestible – how long is the queue outside the supermarket? Do I need to wash vegetables if they’re wrapped in plastic? Can I walk in a park if everyone else is walking in the same park? – perhaps because the larger questions are too big to take in, including the largest of all: is this plague going to kill someone I love? Will it kill me?

This is the greatest UK public health crisis in a century. It threatens a death toll in five figures. It dwarfs any such menace since the Spanish flu afflicted a nation already staggering from the losses of the first world war. Perhaps it will come to seem like an act of God that none of us could have done anything about, a plague on all our houses that could not be averted.
so, despite the fear and the loneliness and the claustrophobia and the economic hardship of lockdown, few would say the country has sunk into despair.

Privately, our lives have been pared down to their barest essentials: no sport, no live entertainment, no nights out – just work, for those who still have it, family and remote contact with friends.

The work has changed – all laptops, pyjamas and Zoom for those who once toiled in offices – while family life has changed too, becoming much more concentrated and intense.

For some, that has been an unexpected joy; for others, it has been suffocating and even dangerous.

But our public life has also been stripped to its essentials. We’ve come to see what’s indispensable and what is not.

It turns out that we can function without celebrities or star athletes, but we really cannot function without nurses, doctors, care workers, delivery drivers, the stackers of supermarket shelves or, perhaps unexpectedly, good neighbours.

If you didn’t value those people before – some of those belatedly recognised as key workers are among the lowest paid – you surely value them now. In a new tradition, we emerge from our homes and start clapping every Thursday night at 8pm to make sure they know.

Almost everything the prime minister predicted a hundred days ago has failed to come true: 2020 will not be a year of growth or prosperity, but the very opposite. And yet, on one thing he was right. Somehow, we have left the widest rift of recent years behind.

Leave or remain now feels like an ancient divide, made suddenly irrelevant when the only distinction that matters is alive or dead.
 
For once the Welsh Government have done something I agree with. They've unilaterally extended our lockdown by one week, initially and reviewing weekly thereafter, I believe.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
. . . and yet we still have arrogant twats hauling mobile homes down here (Pembs), desperate to fit in a sneaky early Easter beak.

The twats.
 
Cut and paste from the guardian, if you take all the bollocks out if the middle then it reads a little better!
Maybe it does, but I'm sorry, I simply couldn't get past this bit ...

"The world has been transformed in that time, perhaps nowhere more so than Britain."

Really? I mean, fücking really!?
 

rifleair

War Hero
Maybe it does, but I'm sorry, I simply couldn't get past this bit ...

"The world has been transformed in that time, perhaps nowhere more so than Britain."

Really? I mean, ******* really!?
Well, perhaps, can you remember a time other than actual war when a Tory government spent money like water!
 
For once the Welsh Government have done something I agree with. They've unilaterally extended our lockdown by one week, initially and reviewing weekly thereafter, I believe.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
Better than nothing I suppose...

In light of the proven and inescapable triple link between sheep shagging, male voice choirs and corona virus isnt’t it boyo, the Welsh Government was asked to extend the lockdown for a century with lip service reviews each decade.
 
Cut and paste from the guardian, if you take all the bollocks out if the middle then it reads a little better!


“There are decades where nothing happens; and there are weeks where decades happen.”

So said Vladimir Ilyich Lenin of the ferment of revolution, but he could just as easily have been talking about the 100 days that have passed since the moment coronavirus officially became a global phenomenon, the day China reported the new contagion to the World Health Organization.

The world has been transformed in that time, perhaps nowhere more so than Britain.

A hundred days ago, on 31 December, the UK prime minister delivered a video message full of hope and promise.

The coming year would, he said, be a “fantastic” one, the start of “an exhilarating decade of growth, prosperity and opportunity”. In 2020, he enthused, Britain would brim with “confidence"

The early weeks suggested the PM might be right on one count at least. After three and a half years of rancour over Brexit, some of the poison began to drain out of the issue. Of course, it wasn’t “done”, as Johnson promised it would be, but it seemed as if we might dwell on lesser worries.

We saw in 2020 debating Megxit, a country with no greater angst on its mind than whether the Sussexes should carry on royalling.

On 31 January, the UK formally left the European Union. This new coronavirus was low down on the bulletins, safely tagged as foreign news.

Even by early March, it had not quite bared its teeth. People knew the official advice but weren’t sure quite how seriously they were meant to take it. Those politicians involved in public health messaging might attempt an awkward elbow bump at the start of a meeting, only to end it with a handshake or even a bear hug.

Johnson himself, at a press conference on 3 March, cheerfully boasted that he was still shaking hands with people he met – including, he said, people infected with coronavirus.

And yet, after a couple of those weeks in which decades happen, on 23 March Johnson was delivering a TV address to the nation, announcing a lockdown in what might have been a hackneyed scene from dystopian fiction. The pubs were closed, along with the football grounds and the cinemas and the theatres and the schools. Places that normally throb with noise were suddenly quiet and have remained so.


You can jog through Leicester Square, London, a place normally teeming with tourists, and hear nothing more than the flapping of a distant flag.

Two weeks on from that original edict and now the death toll is in the thousands with the prime minister himself in intensive care, a development that shook people who did not expect to be shaken. Decades, in weeks.

This is a story of change so rapid, we can barely absorb it.

People focus on the questions that are human scale and therefore digestible – how long is the queue outside the supermarket? Do I need to wash vegetables if they’re wrapped in plastic? Can I walk in a park if everyone else is walking in the same park? – perhaps because the larger questions are too big to take in, including the largest of all: is this plague going to kill someone I love? Will it kill me?

This is the greatest UK public health crisis in a century. It threatens a death toll in five figures. It dwarfs any such menace since the Spanish flu afflicted a nation already staggering from the losses of the first world war. Perhaps it will come to seem like an act of God that none of us could have done anything about, a plague on all our houses that could not be averted.
so, despite the fear and the loneliness and the claustrophobia and the economic hardship of lockdown, few would say the country has sunk into despair.

Privately, our lives have been pared down to their barest essentials: no sport, no live entertainment, no nights out – just work, for those who still have it, family and remote contact with friends.

The work has changed – all laptops, pyjamas and Zoom for those who once toiled in offices – while family life has changed too, becoming much more concentrated and intense.

For some, that has been an unexpected joy; for others, it has been suffocating and even dangerous.

But our public life has also been stripped to its essentials. We’ve come to see what’s indispensable and what is not.

It turns out that we can function without celebrities or star athletes, but we really cannot function without nurses, doctors, care workers, delivery drivers, the stackers of supermarket shelves or, perhaps unexpectedly, good neighbours.

If you didn’t value those people before – some of those belatedly recognised as key workers are among the lowest paid – you surely value them now. In a new tradition, we emerge from our homes and start clapping every Thursday night at 8pm to make sure they know.

Almost everything the prime minister predicted a hundred days ago has failed to come true: 2020 will not be a year of growth or prosperity, but the very opposite. And yet, on one thing he was right. Somehow, we have left the widest rift of recent years behind.

Leave or remain now feels like an ancient divide, made suddenly irrelevant when the only distinction that matters is alive or dead.
I refer you to my answer given previously.
 
Well, perhaps, can you remember a time other than actual war when a Tory government spent money like water!
So, do you agree that the UK has seen a bigger transformation than perhaps France, Spain, Italy, Singapore, S Korea, the area around Wuhan ... ?
 
Here's a very good article from The Guardian on the societal impact of CV19. I commend people read it.

Anyone, and the writer of the piece by the sounds of it, who 'suddenly' realises that celebrities (and the media / journalists) are of no value and that it's the 'key workers', gawd bless 'em, - stackers and health care staff who keep this country going, is a complete cnut.
 

rifleair

War Hero
So, do you agree that the UK has seen a bigger transformation than perhaps France, Spain, Italy, Singapore, S Korea, the area around Wuhan ... ?
I did say perhaps, I don't agree with the writer and was just trying to make it a little less puke making!
 
. . . and yet we still have arrogant twats hauling mobile homes down here (Pembs), desperate to fit in a sneaky early Easter beak.

The twats.
Apparently, they have their own comms network to coordinate their movements along back roads to avoid the police.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 
For once the Welsh Government have done something I agree with. They've unilaterally extended our lockdown by one week, initially and reviewing weekly thereafter, I believe.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
And subsequently jocks taking same line. I think they are wise to the risks caused by letting the media influence things by banging on about exit strategy.

If the govt haven't slapped down the editors/owners in private, they need to do some slapping down in public.


Another LK dit - yesterday evening I was on the phone as she was looking really miserable outside St. Thomas's, so thinking someone might have died during the evening I put subtitles on. As I did so, her headlining switched to a pre-recorded update on Boris improving and being perky. No wonder she looked so miserable.
 

rifleair

War Hero
Why? The article was shite and no amount of your "yebbut excuses" turd-glitter caveats can make it any less shite.
Which bit of, I don't agree with the writer and was trying to make it less puke making, suggests to you that I thought the writer was right and was making "yebbut excuses" for him!
 

Offa

War Hero
Add Sophie Ridge to the mediamong list

Matt Hancock interview

people must stay at home and only go out for essential reasons Like essential shopping or to exercise once a day

are you saying sunbathing is against the law?

It seems the f’ing airhead can’t understand that going to the beach and bronzing isn’t ‘exercise’.
Egyptian P.T.?
 

Offa

War Hero
And subsequently jocks taking same line. I think they are wise to the risks caused by letting the media influence things by banging on about exit strategy.

If the govt haven't slapped down the editors/owners in private, they need to do some slapping down in public.


Another LK dit - yesterday evening I was on the phone as she was looking really miserable outside St. Thomas's, so thinking someone might have died during the evening I put subtitles on. As I did so, her headlining switched to a pre-recorded update on Boris improving and being perky. No wonder she looked so miserable.
Liked your post, Whiffler, and especially correct use of 's in Thomas's.
 

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