The march of technology

D

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I’m safe. No beard, no sandals, and not currently wearing socks. But will be shortly :)
I’ve told you time again...you have previously , at a point in life,been of the mindset thus: “Hmmm, I think I want to increase my standing, become a bit more respected..I think some top lip topiary and facial hirsuteness should cover it”.
That you are currently sans facial fungus matters not...you are simply ‘between beards’.
 
I’ve told you time again...you have previously , at a point in life,been of the mindset thus: “Hmmm, I think I want to increase my standing, become a bit more respected..I think some top lip topiary and facial hirsuteness should cover it”.
That you are currently sans facial fungus matters not...you are simply ‘between beards’.

Absolute bollocks. First time I was merely curious, at the age of 32 I had never seen my beard, so I grew it on leaving the mob. Went back a couple months later and my old SSM yelled “there’s a Yeti in my office!”

The second (and only other) time, I was 50. And cold. To all intents and purposes I am bald, so grew my beard in the winter. But then the Lady Roadster showed me a photo with beard and (unusually) glasses, and was shocked to see I looked about 15 years older than I had thought I looked. I shaved it off directly, put my contacts in, and have not had one since. I did have to wear the specs for a bit in 2020 with an eye infection, but I’m done with beards.

You’re just old :)
 
Absolute bollocks. First time I was merely curious, at the age of 32 I had never seen my beard, so I grew it on leaving the mob. Went back a couple months later and my old SSM yelled “there’s a Yeti in my office!”

The second (and only other) time, I was 50. And cold. To all intents and purposes I am bald, so grew my beard in the winter. But then the Lady Roadster showed me a photo with beard and (unusually) glasses, and was shocked to see I looked about 15 years older than I had thought I looked. I shaved it off directly, put my contacts in, and have not had one since. I did have to wear the specs for a bit in 2020 with an eye infection, but I’m done with beards.

You’re just old :)
I had one for a year when I left the army, neatly trimmed, obviously. I called it my trial beard. Unfortunately, it failed its probationary period and was promptly eradicated never to be seen again.
 
The thing is, not much of it is really all that difficult. V=IR, c=fλ, a^2= (b^2+c^2), 2π, SohCahToa, and 10log(A/B) and you’re pretty much off to the races.

Steve Furber and Sophie Wilson were in their 20s when they designed the ARM processor that’s powering the iPad that I’m writing this on. They’d never even thought about designing a microprocessor until they figured out that what was on the market wasn’t good enough, and well, it can’t be that hard, can it?

You're dead right, that is the vast majority of it, but don't forget the one that most people forget:

C = B Log2 (1+S/N)
Those 2 posts alone tell me I was not wrong to decline my CO's proposal to make me RSO . .
 
I have been interested in computers since I was 16 and did a short post-O-Level course in that pointless gap period between finishing them and the end of term. Still got the ZX-81, keyboard Spectrum and Vectrex game machine upstairs (had a few more but some scally borrowed them long term, the thieving get).

Apart from the obvious near-exponential growth in computer power, storage and capability two things stick out for me.

Firstly the actual capability of older mini and mainframe computers, even when their raw power looks like a joke today. I worked briefly for an end user company in the mid-eighties. Our IBM System/36 was upgraded to its maximum capacity circa 1986. This was 6Mb of memory and 600Mb of DASD (the IBM Extended TLA for hard disks). This looks like a joke compared to my phone, let alone my laptops.

Yet it supported four RPG programmers, about 15 punch bags doing data entry onscreen and via card readers, remote comms to a second site with a System/34 and a fair amount of data processing. My phone can do one of these at a time. At the time there were numerous IBM (and other) mainframes supporting thousands of users, developers and comms with specs that would look Mickey Mouse today.

Secondly: my first proper (i.e Windows) PC back in the late eighties had 16Mb of memory, a 160Mb drive and probably a 286 processor. There has been a steady progression to 32Gb, 2Tb and i7.

Yet they all took exactly the same amount of time to bleeding well boot up.
 
I have been interested in computers since I was 16 and did a short post-O-Level course in that pointless gap period between finishing them and the end of term. Still got the ZX-81, keyboard Spectrum and Vectrex game machine upstairs (had a few more but some scally borrowed them long term, the thieving get).

Apart from the obvious near-exponential growth in computer power, storage and capability two things stick out for me.

Firstly the actual capability of older mini and mainframe computers, even when their raw power looks like a joke today. I worked briefly for an end user company in the mid-eighties. Our IBM System/36 was upgraded to its maximum capacity circa 1986. This was 6Mb of memory and 600Mb of DASD (the IBM Extended TLA for hard disks). This looks like a joke compared to my phone, let alone my laptops.

Yet it supported four RPG programmers, about 15 punch bags doing data entry onscreen and via card readers, remote comms to a second site with a System/34 and a fair amount of data processing. My phone can do one of these at a time. At the time there were numerous IBM (and other) mainframes supporting thousands of users, developers and comms with specs that would look Mickey Mouse today.

Secondly: my first proper (i.e Windows) PC back in the late eighties had 16Mb of memory, a 160Mb drive and probably a 286 processor. There has been a steady progression to 32Gb, 2Tb and i7.

Yet they all took exactly the same amount of time to bleeding well boot up.
As machines got bigger and faster, operating systems have had more and more "features"* added.
I wonder how quickly a modern spec machine would boot into Windows 3.1?

* you can uninstall some features, but many are loaded whether you need them or not.
 
Indeed, it is a combination of increased functionality (necessary) and bloatware (mostly junk).

Even so . . .
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
Secondly: my first proper (i.e Windows) PC back in the late eighties had 16Mb of memory, a 160Mb drive and probably a 286 processor. There has been a steady progression to 32Gb, 2Tb and i7.

Yet they all took exactly the same amount of time to bleeding well boot up.

should get an SSD as your boot drive, grandad.

;)
 
I'm glad my class of patrol car has improved over the years. ;)
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should get an SSD as your boot drive, grandad.

;)

Been keeping an eye on the prices. I have a lot of data spread across music, books, pictures and documents so need a large one.

Now that 1Tb drives are under a ton I will go for one.
 

endure

GCM
Been keeping an eye on the prices. I have a lot of data spread across music, books, pictures and documents so need a large one.

Now that 1Tb drives are under a ton I will go for one.
Get an SSD boot drive and put all your music and stuff on an external hard drive.

Ebuyer are doing a 1TB Crucial SSD for 90 quid plus postage

 
Those 2 posts alone tell me I was not wrong to decline my CO's proposal to make me RSO . .

Chalk & cheese.

Infantry RSOs shouldn't need to know much about the underlying theory, you get your CNR gear issued and use it. RSWO presumably does the comms planning, and if it breaks, REME fixes it. On our side of the fence we had much greater capacity systems, formal messages (and DCN), higher-level crypto, EW, our own techs, electricians etc.

A bit like you guys get your Milans, GMGs, Warriors etc, while we get iron sights and thunderflashes. Or Assault Pioneers get an axe, spade, roll of barbed wire and wire cutters while Sappers get JCBs, AVREs and bridgelayers.

I agree with you though, I imagine RSO is a bit of a career oopsie for an infantry bloke with command aspirations.
 
As machines got bigger and faster, operating systems have had more and more "features"* added.
I wonder how quickly a modern spec machine would boot into Windows 3.1?

* you can uninstall some features, but many are loaded whether you need them or not.
Bloatbox seems to have gained quite a reputation recently as the remedy for some of that. Haven't dabbled with it (yet) myself.
 

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