The march of technology

AI robot bodyguards will be a thing in the next few years (In my lifetime), I had a remote controlled car when I was a sprog - and it wasn't wireless as it had a cable going to it. Tech stands still for nobody.

Probably in the future time travel will be a thing - you won't need to travel faster than light speed to travel around the universe - you can just travel slowly inside a 'time bubble' and get somewhere instantaneously to any point in the universe and at any time. It wouldn't surprise me if some aliens already have this capability.
You don't look a bit like your avatar.
1609925406600.png
 
In the 80s I carried a "portable!" radio similar to this.
View attachment 536396
It weighed a ton and had a range of a few miles, fast forward 35 years, its a lot easier now, I can now speak to my control room 150 miles away with this radio. ;)
View attachment 536397

In the early 90’s an ex 14/20th officer was selling mobile phones like that. And the plugged in ‘car phone’ variant. Let’s call him John, as that is his name.

He found himself at a set of lights next to a pair of very attractive fillies in an open-top car. To impress them he started to have an imaginary conversation on his phone.

He recounts that it was all going well until the phone rang while he was holding it...
 
Whern I started playing the guitar the only way to tune the strings was by ear, a handy piano or tuning fork or a set of pitch pipes...

pitch-pipe.jpg


All of these also required good hearing and the ability to tell when the strings are in tune...

These days I use one of these:

577SNARK1_300x300.jpg


Its an electronic polyphonic tuner which clips on to the end of the guitar. It has a contact microphone built-in and detects very low-level vibrations, detecting the string pitch from the vibrations through the body of the guitar. It detects the analogue signal and using pitch detection establishes the frequency. It then processes this information (converting from analogue to digital), displays the information on a visual display.

They can tune accurately in noisy environments without needing to plug in and work perfectly with either electric or acoustic guitars. This model also has a built in metronome...

Costs less than £20.00...
 
Whern I started playing the guitar the only way to tune the strings was by ear, a handy piano or tuning fork or a set of pitch pipes...

pitch-pipe.jpg


All of these also required good hearing and the ability to tell when the strings are in tune...

These days I use one of these:

577SNARK1_300x300.jpg


Its an electronic polyphonic tuner which clips on to the end of the guitar. It has a contact microphone built-in and detects very low-level vibrations, detecting the string pitch from the vibrations through the body of the guitar. It detects the analogue signal and using pitch detection establishes the frequency. It then processes this information (converting from analogue to digital), displays the information on a visual display.

They can tune accurately in noisy environments without needing to plug in and work perfectly with either electric or acoustic guitars. This model also has a built in metronome...

Costs less than £20.00...
I have an electronic tuner built into my Seagull acoustic. Pretty good!
 
I have an electronic tuner built into my Seagull acoustic. Pretty good!
Two of my acoustics have them as well but I tend to just swap the Snark around as required as it is so easy to use.
 

philc

LE
When I first started working in Civvie St on IT stuff it was looking after these. DEC 300 Mb Removable drives, they took plattered drives that stored the data which was read by heads floating above the platters when it spun round. If a head touched the platter it basically crashed, exploded sending debris every where. This meant a deep clean, new heads that needed aligning and a new removable drive. Hours of fun as the tolerances were very tight.

dec 300mb.jpg


The drives, these were 300 Mb and the size of 9 vinyl albums stacked on beach other separated by an aluminium ring.

It was for a proprietary system know as Atex for publishing. The drives them selves were the size of a large top loading tumble dryer and can be seen in any Science museum.

cdc drive.jpg
 
When I first started working in Civvie St on IT stuff it was looking after these. DEC 300 Mb Removable drives, they took plattered drives that stored the data which was read by heads floating above the platters when it spun round. If a head touched the platter it basically crashed, exploded sending debris every where. This meant a deep clean, new heads that needed aligning and a new removable drive. Hours of fun as the tolerances were very tight.

View attachment 536462

The drives, these were 300 Mb and the size of 9 vinyl albums stacked on beach other separated by an aluminium ring.

It was for a proprietary system know as Atex for publishing. The drives them selves were the size of a large top loading tumble dryer and can be seen in any Science museum.

View attachment 536463

I remember a visit to the Army Pay administration centre back in the early 1980s - it had a huge room full of them things...
 
I did an industrial attachment to a big engineering consultancy in Chatswood, Sydney in 1993. Their big project at the time was the infrastructure for a new suburb, what is now Rouse Hill and home to 300,000 people. The partners had a laptop, the receptionist and typing pool had word processors. Only the draftsmen had PC. None of the engineers had computers; the entire design for water, waste water, roads, rail etc was carried out manually with calculators and design sheets. Hard to believe.
 
You bastard!

I’ll make the traditional call out though...

Gents, we’re now at max beard.
I've seen threads on this site, where there are months long discussions about the particular variant of Messerschmitt BF109, or Ferret scout car that were in use in any given theatre on any given Tuesday in any given unit, but this...this...is a beard thread?

When people get all "Oh look at those nerds" concerning technology matters, it reminds me of how it must have been in the dark ages when ordinary peasants probably said things like, "Hahaha, look at those nerds with all their high-fallutin' readin' and writin'!"
 
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I've seen threads on this site, where there are months long discussions about the particular variant of Messerschmidt BF109, or Ferret scout car that were in use in any given theatre on any given Tuesday in any given unit, but this...this...is a beard thread?

When people get all "Oh look at those nerds" concerning technology matters, it reminds me of how it must have been in the dark ages when ordinary peasants probably said things like, "Hahaha, look at those nerds with all their high-fallutin' readin' and writin'!"

The thing is, not much of it is really all that difficult. V=IR, c=fλ, a^2= (b^2+c^2), 2π, SohCahToa, and 10log(A/B) and you’re pretty much off to the races.

Steve Furber and Sophie Wilson were in their 20s when they designed the ARM processor that’s powering the iPad that I’m writing this on. They’d never even thought about designing a microprocessor until they figured out that what was on the market wasn’t good enough, and well, it can’t be that hard, can it?
 

DAS

War Hero
When I first started working in Civvie St on IT stuff it was looking after these. DEC 300 Mb Removable drives, they took plattered drives that stored the data which was read by heads floating above the platters when it spun round. If a head touched the platter it basically crashed, exploded sending debris every where. This meant a deep clean, new heads that needed aligning and a new removable drive. Hours of fun as the tolerances were very tight.

View attachment 536462

The drives, these were 300 Mb and the size of 9 vinyl albums stacked on beach other separated by an aluminium ring.

It was for a proprietary system know as Atex for publishing. The drives them selves were the size of a large top loading tumble dryer and can be seen in any Science museum.

View attachment 536463
We had something similar, HP, on a certain aircraft, without a mad boom. That was a joy to change when the engines were running ready for transit to mission.
 
Probably in the future time travel will be a thing - you won't need to travel faster than light speed to travel around the universe - you can just travel slowly inside a 'time bubble' and get somewhere instantaneously to any point in the universe and at any time. It wouldn't surprise me if some aliens already have this capability.
Time dilation - yes - very possible.
Backwards time travel - Impossible.
 
We had something similar, HP, on a certain aircraft, without a mad boom. That was a joy to change when the engines were running ready for transit to mission.
Apropos nothing, but the story was that the Wavell 2 rack came out of a discontinued Nimrod project.
 
D

Deleted 4482

Guest
I've seen threads on this site, where there are months long discussions about the particular variant of Messerschmitt BF109, or Ferret scout car that were in use in any given theatre on any given Tuesday in any given unit, but this...this...is a beard thread?

When people get all "Oh look at those nerds" concerning technology matters, it reminds me of how it must have been in the dark ages when ordinary peasants probably said things like, "Hahaha, look at those nerds with all their high-fallutin' readin' and writin'!"
Well, I might be donning a beard tonight to watch this on IPlayer:

About a schoolgirl and how her maths calculations were used wrt Spitfire.
 
The thing is, not much of it is really all that difficult. V=IR, c=fλ, a^2= (b^2+c^2), 2π, SohCahToa, and 10log(A/B) and you’re pretty much off to the races.

Steve Furber and Sophie Wilson were in their 20s when they designed the ARM processor that’s powering the iPad that I’m writing this on. They’d never even thought about designing a microprocessor until they figured out that what was on the market wasn’t good enough, and well, it can’t be that hard, can it?
You're dead right, that is the vast majority of it, but don't forget the one that most people forget:

C = B Log2 (1+S/N)
 

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