The Long Range Desert Group: History and Legacy

The Long Range Desert Group: History and Legacy

untallguy

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untallguy submitted a new resource:

The Long Range Desert Group: History and Legacy - The LRDG in the Western Desert

The Long Range Desert Group: History and Legacy by Karl-Gunnar Noren and Lars Gyllenhaal is a history of the formation and formative years of the Long Range Desert Group. For those who don’t know who the LRDG were, they were precursors to the SAS (and supported them at the start) and started as a raiding group and then developed specialist road-watch skills to support operational intelligence gathering.

This book is a labour of love, no two ways about it. Noren and Gyllenhaal are...
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As the LRDG numbers dwindled, the SAS Association 'adopted' the group and who have become well ingrained into the DNA of subsequent annual meetings.

LRDG have a stone memorial within the cloisters of Westminster Cathedral. It sits alongside the Parachute Regiment and SAS Memorials. A granite stone with the scorpion embossement. A really quiet, unobtrusive, piece, which, I guess, a lot of tourists pass by in the majesty of their visit to such a location.

It suits such a unit as these.
 
Bagnold's work is remarkable in every respect. Libyan Sands is a must read. Ref the missing actions outside of Libya, David Lloyd Owen wrote his own accounts of actually being there. See also Mike Mogan (fwd by DLO).
 
Without wishing to trample if there is an interest in the LRDG may I recommend:

Bearded Brigands: The legendary Long Range Desert Group in the diaries and photographs of Trooper Frank Jopling

Author: Brendan O'Carroll
 
Bagnold's work is remarkable in every respect. Libyan Sands is a must read. Ref the missing actions outside of Libya, David Lloyd Owen wrote his own accounts of actually being there. See also Mike Mogan (fwd by DLO).
His later* studies on dunes and sand movement fed a lot into oil and gas, especially seismic operations and construction.
I haven't done an overlay of LRDG ops and post war oil infrastructure in Libya (...yet. I'm still deluded enough to think I have a life), and I wouldn't be surprised if there is some overlap in the east

E2A: my mistake/clarification. His studies were in 1935 after his time as a Subaltern in Egypt and before his LRDG stint. he then went very into fluid dynamics post WW2 and others used his studies as a spring board.
https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspa.1936.0218
 
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