The lanyard of courage

#1
Just been chatting with a Grunt I know, who gave it the old - you Scaley's are a bunch of mincers far from the front line.
I informed said Grunt we have a history of being there in the middle of it all, and in fact our lanyard was awarded after our lads took command of some guns abandonded by the Drop Shorts in World War One.
He laughed till he was blue in the face and said 'bollox did you'
Am I right here - There's a Corps pride at stake and a night on the lash...
 
#4
is this the story of the artillary abondoning there guns and the re s manning them something about a yellow lanyard :?
 
#5
First World War - 28 July 1914–11 November 1918.

'Corps of Signals' formed on 28th June 1920. Six weeks later, His Majesty the King conferred the title 'Royal Corps of Signals'.

So, no. The Corps had nothing to do with the event you're talking about.
 
#7
The lanyard came from the Sappers, so why do the Sappers wear the Lanyard?

from http://www.remuseum.org.uk/rem_his_tradition.htm

Corps Lanyard and Stable Belt

Lanyard - The Royal Engineers lanyard is navy blue and worn on the right shoulder. Since 19th century plain lanyards were used for securing the jackknife which was issued to all mounted troops. It was intended to be worn around the waist but soldiers soon found it to be more convenient to wear it on the shoulder with the knife in the breast pocket. The Royal Engineers, as did other corps and regiments of the British Army, introduced the lanyard to brighten up their battledress uniform in 1951.
From the all knowing source that is Wiki (couldn't find anything else)

On the No 2 uniform the Royal Signals wear a dark blue lanyard signifying its early links with the Royal Engineers.
I have always been told (from training) that the reason we wear a blue Lanyard is because the Engrs did.

Excepting 216, 264 and the yeomanrys obviously.
 
#9
Just to put more info on here.

Fromthe RA Institute http://www.36regimentra.org.uk/id587.htm#origins_of_the_lanyard

There has long been a tale about the Gunners wearing a white lanyard for cowardice, allegedly for deserting their guns,
but the story is nothing more than a piece of leg-pulling. However, it is time to put this particular story to rest.

Lanyards came into use in the late 19th century when Field Gunners manned the 12 and 15 Pounder equipments,
ammunition for which had a fuze set with a fuze key. The key was a simple device, and every man had one, attached
to a lanyard worn around the neck. The key itself tended to be kept in the breast pocket until needed. The lanyard was
simply a piece of strong cord, but in time it was a typical soldier's reaction to turn it into something a bit more decorative.
It was smartened up with white ink or even blanco, and braided, gradually taking its present form.

Prior to the South African War, Gunners were issued with steel folding hoof picks, carried on the saddle or in the jacket.
In about 1903 these were withdrawn and replaced by jack-knives, which were carried in the left breast pocket of the
Service Dress attached to the lanyard over the left shoulder.

During the two World Wars, the lanyard could be used as an emergency firing lanyard for many of the guns, because
they had a firing mechanism which operated like a trigger. The lanyard could be attached to the trigger mechanism and
allowed the Gunner to stand clear of the gun's recoil.

The question of which shoulder bore the lanyard depends on the date. There is no certainty about this, but the change
from the left shoulder to the right probable took place at about the time of the Great War, when the bandolier was
introduced, because it was worn over the left shoulder. But there are some who insist that 1924 was the date of change,
when the sloping of rifles over the left shoulder would soil the white lanyard.

Eventually, in 1933, the end of the lanyard was simply tucked into the breast pocket without the jack-knife, though
many will remember that it was often kept in place with the soldier's pay-book! On the demise of Battledress, the
lanyard disappeared for a short time, but returned as part of the dress of the Royal Regiment of Artillery in 1973.

For those still plagued by jokers, the simplest answer to any leg-pulling is to invite the joker to produce evidence:
no change can take place to any of the Army's dress regulations without an appropriate order,
and since no such evidence exists, the joker's story falls flat on its face.

. One might even ask why other arms and corps wear lanyards -
They say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery!!!
And it seems our Antipodean cousins also tell the same stories at the expense fo the Royal Regiment!!!!!

http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-army-today/arty.htm

THE ORIGIN OF THE WHITE LANYARD

The lanyard had a genuine purpose in war. It was originally a piece of cord, approximately a metre in length, used to secure a jack-knife which was issued to both the artillery and the cavalry. The knife had a number of uses; the blade was for cutting loose horses which became entangled in the head and heel ropes of the picket lines, and the spike of the knife was used as a hoof pick, for the removal of stones from horses hooves. A fuse key was also attached to the lanyard.

Hanging loose, the lanyard soon became dirty and for the day-to-day barrack routine it looked out of place on an otherwise smart uniform; so for peace time purposes the lanyard was plaited, and whitened with Blanco, to match both the white bandolier and the white waist belt worn by the gunners of the day. The lanyard was worn on the left shoulder with the end containing both the knife and fuse key tucked into the left breast pocket.

In 1920 the lanyard was moved to the right shoulder, simply because of the difficult problem of trying to remove the knife from the pocket underneath the bandolier. By now the bandolier and belt, worn with battle dress, had long ceased to be white, whilst the lanyard remained so.

The knife was removed in 1933 and the lanyard then became a straight cord, worn purely as an ornamental item of dress.

In 1955 it was, for a short time, reintroduced in the plaited style, but it quickly went back to the straight lanyard currently worn today.

There is simply no truth either to any other popular story regarding the Artillery's white lanyard.
 
#10
Interceptor said:
First World War - 28 July 1914–11 November 1918.

'Corps of Signals' formed on 28th June 1920. Six weeks later, His Majesty the King conferred the title 'Royal Corps of Signals'.

So, no. The Corps had nothing to do with the event you're talking about.
Ok maybe not the corps but the Sqns and Regiments? My Sqn was formed as 1st West Riding Engineer Volunteer Corps formed in Sheffield on 8th Nov 1860
 
#11
Track_Link said:
I informed said Grunt we have a history of being there in the middle of it all, ...
Nah. How many of our Corps paintings have us pointing shooty-sticks at baddies? However....Cpl Waters, Sig Smith and LCpl Jennings et al were awesome! Mind you, I suspect that it won't take long before we have a few 216 Herrick paintings to adorn the walls of messes everywhere.
 
#12
PoisonDwarf said:
Track_Link said:
I informed said Grunt we have a history of being there in the middle of it all, ...
Nah. How many of our Corps paintings have us pointing shooty-sticks at baddies? However....Cpl Waters, Sig Smith and LCpl Jennings et al were awesome! Mind you, I suspect that it won't take long before we have a few 216 Herrick paintings to adorn the walls of messes everywhere.
Well my old Troop OC from basic has his painting all over the place with him pointing his shooty-stick at some nasty Argies, with his famed words of 'Contact Wait Out'
And, I was quite surprised in 91 to note that you can actually see shells in flight as they whizz over your head before going bang on the baddies. So I reckon we're in the thick of it at times
 
#13
Track_Link said:
Just been chatting with a Grunt I know, who gave it the old - you Scaley's are a bunch of mincers far from the front line.
I informed said Grunt we have a history of being there in the middle of it all, and in fact our lanyard was awarded after our lads took command of some guns abandonded by the Drop Shorts in World War One.
He laughed till he was blue in the face and said 'bollox did you'
Am I right here - There's a Corps pride at stake and a night on the lash...
The Engineers were awarded the Artillery lanyard as a battle honour after taking charge of a gun position abandoned by the Artillery.

The R Sigs were spawned from the REs, and therefore carried on wearing the lanyard. R Sigs were not awarded this battle honour in their own right.

Get your facts right, scaley nobber. Not sure how many battle honours your Corps has, but it's not as many as the REs so don't get carried away about your brave Corps for one minute!
 
#14
zxninerpilot said:
Track_Link said:
Just been chatting with a Grunt I know, who gave it the old - you Scaley's are a bunch of mincers far from the front line.
I informed said Grunt we have a history of being there in the middle of it all, and in fact our lanyard was awarded after our lads took command of some guns abandonded by the Drop Shorts in World War One.
He laughed till he was blue in the face and said 'bollox did you'
Am I right here - There's a Corps pride at stake and a night on the lash...
The Engineers were awarded the Artillery lanyard as a battle honour after taking charge of a gun position abandoned by the Artillery.

The R Sigs were spawned from the REs, and therefore carried on wearing the lanyard. R Sigs were not awarded this battle honour in their own right.

Get your facts right, scaley nobber. Not sure how many battle honours your Corps has, but it's not as many as the REs so don't get carried away about your brave Corps for one minute!
Yeeees and as shown above and on loads of other posts on the same subject your explanation of the RE lanyard is bollards.
So wind it in :wink:
 
#15
Track_Link said:
And, I was quite surprised in 91 to note that you can actually see shells in flight as they whizz over your head before going bang on the baddies. So I reckon we're in the thick of it at times
Didn't we lead the first Iraq invasion with some Ptarmigan trunks?
 
#17
zxninerpilot said:
beukyboy said:
is this the story of the artillary abondoning there guns and the re s manning them something about a yellow lanyard :?
The RA were awarded a white lanyard.
No they weren't. This is a myth. A lie. A made up story for gullible fools. Not true. False. Incorrect. Something told to young soldiers for sh1t and giggles.

In short bollocks.
 
#18
zxninerpilot said:
Track_Link said:
Just been chatting with a Grunt I know, who gave it the old - you Scaley's are a bunch of mincers far from the front line.
I informed said Grunt we have a history of being there in the middle of it all, and in fact our lanyard was awarded after our lads took command of some guns abandonded by the Drop Shorts in World War One.
He laughed till he was blue in the face and said 'bollox did you'
Am I right here - There's a Corps pride at stake and a night on the lash...
The Engineers were awarded the Artillery lanyard as a battle honour after taking charge of a gun position abandoned by the Artillery.

The R Sigs were spawned from the REs, and therefore carried on wearing the lanyard. R Sigs were not awarded this battle honour in their own right.

Get your facts right, scaley nobber. Not sure how many battle honours your Corps has, but it's not as many as the REs so don't get carried away about your brave Corps for one minute!
Jesus can people please do a little research before mouthing off about something they have absolutely no knowledge off, its bad enough when this crap is mentioned by the naive and gullable but to do it when there are posts in the same thread that says its balls is just plain stupid.

History is based on facts not some spurious rumour told to you by a drunken full screw in training whilst you were fellating him in the shower

Oh and by the way

1. There is no Warrant Officer who mistakingly shagged his daughter in a darkened guardroom cell
2. Some yank warship didn't tell a lighthouse to move
3. Bromide wasn't put in the tea to stop you getting a hard-on
4. No General told a radio reporter she was equipped to be a prostitute
5. Recruits are not nor never have been issued stress cards
6. Dog tags aren't supposed to be jammed in the front teeth of a dead soldier

There have I spolit anyone elses mess time idle chats ?
 
#19
I think everyone is missing the point. Why let the truth get in the way of a good story.

Ok so the REs wore the lanyard to brighten up their battle dress the same as most other Corps were doing at that time. Sounds a bit boring though hence the myths.

It is true, however, thet R Sigs decended from the REs and carried on wearing the lanyard.

And it is true that all scaleys are nobbers.
 
#20
Lanyard - The Royal Engineers lanyard is navy blue and worn on the right shoulder. Since 19th century plain lanyards were used for securing the jackknife which was issued to all mounted troops. It was intended to be worn around the waist but soldiers soon found it to be more convenient to wear it on the shoulder with the knife in the breast pocket. The Royal Engineers, as did other corps and regiments of the British Army, introduced the lanyard to brighten up their battledress uniform in 1951.

Extracted from information held by the RE Museum.

Myth spoiled by people being too serious on this site.
 
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