The Joys of Speaking a Foreign language

Today’s weather forecast from the main Swiss TV broadcaster, SRF
 
But I can speak and understand it, AddMyForeskin - and you can't!

How annoying is that, eh? :lol: :lol: :lol:

MsG
Bugsy, do me, yourself and everyone else a favour.

This is a thread for those who speak a foreign language at whatever level. It's really quite good and interesting. Yet you have come here and once again tried to elevenerife everyone, only to be found to be speaking fluent bollocks once again.

Please take it to the poo-poo thread, or even better, this one:

How's your German

I mean, you really had everyone on the ropes.
 

Serpico

War Hero
Today’s weather forecast from the main Swiss TV broadcaster, SRF

Not enough umlauts in that to be Swiss-German, shirley?
 

Heartbreaklane

War Hero
The same with Cantonese. When I was in Hong Kong I did a two week basic Cantonese Course at Osborne Barracks. On the course was a British Gurkha Major who had spent 17 years in Hong Kong, a WO2 RAOC ATO bloke, R Sigs and other odds and sods. I thought it would be a two week doss just learning words and sentences. I had learnt a bit of German just from buying one of those PILL cassette tape 24 hour learning courses in the early seventies.

How wrong I was. Cantonese is all mainly one syllable words with six different tones for each word, three low tone and three high tone, so depending in which tone was used, a word can mean six different things. Our instructors were Chinese soldiers from the HKMSC and were all good blokes. In one of the lessons we all went out to a Dim Sum restaurant at lunchtime and had to order Dim Sum. I am pretty certain that the HKMSC guy briefed the old dears bringing around the Dim Sum trolley's beforehand that he was bring a load of thick gweilos around and to humour them or they were used to it as there would be a course there every fortnight. The HKMSC guy probably got a free lunch.

Anyway I scrapped through with a pass. A pity I had no aptitude as you could go on to do a two year joint services course if you were. Paddy Ashdown completed it when he was in the Royal Marines according to his autobiography. I decided to test out my new found skills on a taxi driver and told him I wanted to go to Osborne barracks in my best tonal Cantonese. He looked at me blankly. So I reverted to squaddie Cantonese, "Kowloon Tong Ping fong", Renfrew road (Kowloon Tong Army camp) "ah so" as mr taxi drivers face lit up with comprehension.

Apparently Gurkha soldiers picked up Cantonese quite well although I don't think Nepali is a tonal language. The locals all understood 'Lapsap' and 'Sapgaw' which means ****** and rubbish, I can't remember which is which.

Both Thai and Vietnamese appear to be high pitched tonal languages like Cantonese. Perhaps because the inhabitants of those two countries originally came from Southern China. Mandarin sounds totatally different, more of a gutteral language like Japanese. I wonder if it is easier to learn for us Gweilos.
Mandarin has 4 tones. I found it harder but then was working day to day with Cantonese speakers.

Lapsap is rubbish and Supgow is w****r. Well remembered.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
Bugsy, do me, yourself and everyone else a favour.

This is a thread for those who speak a foreign language at whatever level. It's really quite good and interesting. Yet you have come here and once again tried to elevenerife everyone, only to be found to be speaking fluent bollocks once again.

Please take it to the poo-poo thread, or even better, this one:

How's your German

I mean, you really had everyone on the ropes.
Well, AddMyForeskin, now that you've given everyone an idea of just how, er, "fluent" you are in German, you might want to take your own advice.

As usual, it's gobshites like you who're eager to get in their infantile remarks at me who derail good threads, not me. And this thread is no exception.

Und wenn's dir dermaßen auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist geht, dann kannste die Biege machen, im übertragenen Sinne natürlich. :lol: :lol: :lol:

MsG
 
Well, AddMyForeskin, now that you've given everyone an idea of just how, er, "fluent" you are in German, you might want to take your own advice.

As usual, it's gobshites like you who're eager to get in their infantile remarks at me who derail good threads, not me. And this thread is no exception.

Und wenn's dir dermaßen auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist geht, dann kannste die Biege machen, im übertragenen Sinne natürlich. :lol: :lol: :lol:

MsG

I always help that when discussing a foreign language, when should include an explanation of the section in the target language.

That way one is using it to educate, inform or inspire.

Rather than the impression that one is showing off or point scoring.....?
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
I always help that when discussing a foreign language, when should include an explanation of the section in the target language.

That way one is using it to educate, inform or inspire.

Rather than the impression that one is showing off or point scoring.....?
It won't have escaped your attention that a few of the usual Bugsy stalkers are (for some reason) out to "prove" that I don't speak any foreign languages at all. Why they find that so extremely important is another question.

I purposely formulated the "German section" of my post in the vernacular to make it a bit more difficult to just run it through Google Translate and then claim to have understood it. However, other ARRSErs who're thoroughly familiar with the language, for instance, @lastwalt or @Brotherton Lad, will have no difficulties.

But for others, I will follow your good advice and offer an explanation. I wrote:

"Und wenn's dir dermaßen auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist geht, dann kannste die Biege machen, im übertragenen Sinne natürlich."

Translation:
And if it gets on your nerves that much, you can always do one, naturally in a figurative sense.

- ... auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den geist geht. The Germans have a number of possibilities to express the fact that something gets on their nerves. "Du gehst mir auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist" translated "one-on-one", as it were, means: "You go to me on the nuts/the sack (ballbag)/the mind or spirit. It all has the same essential meaning. It's also possible to simply say: "Du nervst mich" - Your nerve me.

- ... dann kannste die Biege machen". That's a (fairly) normal vernacular phrase meaning go away. Literally translated it means "then can you the bend make". Other terms available to express the same sentiment are: "Schleich dich" (sidle you) or "Verzupf dich" (pluck you). Another version is: "Mach, dass du weg kommst" (make that you away come).

Furthermore, I used two elisions ("wenn's" and "kannste") that are not "official" in nature but are commonly used and understood by practically everyone. The full versions are: "wenn es" (when it) and "kannst du" (can you).

Lastly, the phrase "... im übertragenen Sinne" literally translates as: "in the over-carried sense" meaning "in a figurative sense", although there's also the German alternative of "figurativ".

If there's anything I've left out that still requires an explanation, please let me know.

MsG
 
Last edited:
It won't have escaped your attention that a few of the usual Bugsy stalkers are (for some reason) out to "prove" that I don't speak any foreign languages at all. Why they find that so extremely important is another question........
If there's anything I've left out that still requires an explanation, please let me know.

MsG


Why yes actually.

You can answer my detailed rebuttal your gobbing off about Mark Duggan that you have never given me the courtesy of a reply to from 2016 or direct me to you reply?

 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
It won't have escaped your attention that a few of the usual Bugsy stalkers are (for some reason) out to "prove" that I don't speak any foreign languages at all. Why they find that so extremely important is another question.

I purposely formulated the "German section" of my post in the vernacular to make it a bit more difficult to just run it through Google Translate and then claim to have understood it. However, other ARRSErs who're thoroughly familiar with the language, for instance, @lastwalt or @Brotherton Lad, will have no difficulties.

But for others, I will follow your good advice and offer an explanation. I wrote:

"Und wenn's dir dermaßen auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist geht, dann kannste die Biege machen, im übertragenen Sinne natürlich."

Translation:
And if it gets on your nerves that much, you can always do one, naturally in a figurative sense.

- ... auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den geist geht. The Germans have a number of possibilities to express the fact that something gets on their nerves. "Du gehst mir auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist" translated "one-on-one", as it were, means: "You go to me on the nuts/the sack (ballbag)/the mind or spirit. It all has the same essential meaning. It's also possible to simply say: "Du nervst mich" - Your nerve me.

- ... dann kannste die Biege machen". That's a (fairly) normal vernacular phrase meaning go away. Literally translated it means "then can you the bend make". Other terms available to express the same sentiment are: "Schleich dich" (sidle you) or "Verzupf dich" (pluck you). Another version is: "Mach, dass du weg kommst" (make that you away come).

Furthermore, I used two elisions ("wenn's" and "kannste") that are not "official" in nature but are commonly used and understood by practically everyone. The full versions are: "wenn es" (when it) and "kannst du" (can you).

Lastly, the phrase "... im übertragenen Sinne" literally translates as: "in the over-carried sense" meaning "in a figurative sense", although there's also the German alternative of "figurativ".

If there's anything I've left out that still requires an explanation, please let me know.

MsG
1624011094893.png

Old man yells at the internet
 
Well, AddMyForeskin, now that you've given everyone an idea of just how, er, "fluent" you are in German, you might want to take your own advice.

As usual, it's gobshites like you who're eager to get in their infantile remarks at me who derail good threads, not me. And this thread is no exception.

Und wenn's dir dermaßen auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist geht, dann kannste die Biege machen, im übertragenen Sinne natürlich. :lol: :lol: :lol:

MsG
Bugsy. I have never, ever claimed to be fluent in German, only that I have some knowledge of the language.

Oh, and you've just admitted that you make your German here difficult to read on purpose?

The key to any language is simplicity and effective communication; you of all people should know this.

@Krautman was right about your German; it's too flowery to be right.

Some of us tell the truth and don't big ourselves up, which is why I'm not mocked relentlessly on here.

I will invite you to the relevant thread....
 
Bugsy. I have never, ever claimed to be fluent in German, only that I have some knowledge of the language.

Oh, and you've just admitted that you make your German here difficult to read on purpose?

The key to any language is simplicity and effective communication; you of all people should know this.

@Krautman was right about your German; it's too flowery to be right.

Some of us tell the truth and don't big ourselves up, which is why I'm not mocked relentlessly on here.

I will invite you to the relevant thread....
Just for the record, I did tell Bugsy some time ago that the best language form is the simplest. KISS.
 
It won't have escaped your attention that a few of the usual Bugsy stalkers are (for some reason) out to "prove" that I don't speak any foreign languages at all. Why they find that so extremely important is another question.

I purposely formulated the "German section" of my post in the vernacular to make it a bit more difficult to just run it through Google Translate and then claim to have understood it. However, other ARRSErs who're thoroughly familiar with the language, for instance, @lastwalt or @Brotherton Lad, will have no difficulties.

But for others, I will follow your good advice and offer an explanation. I wrote:

"Und wenn's dir dermaßen auf die Nüsse/den Sack/den Geist geht, dann kannste die Biege machen, im übertragenen Sinne natürlich."

Translation:
And if it gets on your nerves that much, you can always do one, naturally in a figurative sense.
Would a native speaker say that this way: "And if it gets on your nerves that much, you can always do one, naturally in a figurative sense."
or
"And if it gets on your nerves, then you can fvcking fvck off you fvcking fvck, figuratively speaking of course."?
I don't think so. That's just Bugsy showing off: "Look how great I am and what a good German I speak."
 
I think German is a very workmanlike language, and probably has had some influence on their success at engineering. Make it robust and effective.
Not when you're trying to have a conversation with someone about the finer points of Hochleistungsflüssigkeitschromatographie or the correct use of the Gleichgewichtsdichtegradientenzentrifugation, not to mention what joy and gratitude a
"Schubstangenspanner mit Sicherheitsverriegelung für Spannstellung und geöffnete Stellung" brings.
 

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