The House is in Dlouha Street, Number 8

#1
In 1995, I was serving with 39 Infantry Brigade, based at Palace Barracks in Holywood. One of the Battalions that formed part of the Brigade counted amongst their ranks a fairly senior Corporal who had once, in his wild and crazy youth, served for 5 years in the French Foreign Legion. I can't name the Battalion involved in order to protect the guilty but let's just say that they were known for enjoying 'Danish Pastries' and going 'Over the Hills and Far Away'.

Anyway, this Corporal (known affectionately as 'Dirty Pierre') was reknowned for mixing French words into English sentences with logic-free abandon. He was also a bit of an alky and supplemented his income by cutting hair cheaply around camp.

One day, he was doing the rounds in one of the junior ranks' accommodation blocks. After shearing a few, he took one look at the double-crowned head of the next lad in line and shouted across to me, 'can you chuck me my posh clippers, mon ami, this one's got mal 'air 'ere'. Read it out loud...

Anyway, the funny thing is that the young lad in question caught something tropical and nasty in Belize and was laid up for weeks with feverish chills. LOL!
 
#2
Did you hand in your sense of humour, cognitive language skills and in-built babble filter when you left the forces?
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#3
roobie is obviously a gentleman of Asian extraction as his name comes from the times when he was being dry bummed and he would constanly cry out "Use roobie, prease. Velly soah" "Roobie".
 
#4
39 Infantry Regiment?????? the 39th Regiment of Foot were The Dorsetshire Regiment surly
 
#6
#10
F@ck off I was in the Cavalry
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#11
Cunt (/ˈkʌnt/) is a vulgarism, primarily referring to the female genitalia, specifically the vulva, and including the cleft of Venus. The earliest citation of this usage in the 1972 Oxford English Dictionary, c 1230, refers to the London street known as Gropecunt Lane. Scholar Germaine Greer has said that "it is one of the few remaining words in the English language with a genuine power to shock."[

Cunt is also used informally as a derogatory epithet in referring to a person of either sex, but this usage is relatively recent, dating back only as far as the late nineteenth century. Reflecting different national usages, the Compact Oxford English Dictionary defines cunt as "an unpleasant or stupid person", whereas Merriam-Webster has a usage of the term as "usually disparaging & obscene: woman", noting that it is used in the US as "an offensive way to refer to a woman"; the Macquarie Dictionary of Australian English defines it as "a despicable man", however when used with a positive qualifier (good, funny, clever, etc.) in countries such as Britain, New Zealand and Australia, it conveys a positive sense of the object or person referred to.

The word appears to have been in common usage from the Middle Ages until the eighteenth century. After a period of disuse, usage became more frequent in the twentieth century, in parallel with the rise of popular literature and pervasive media. The term also has various other derived uses and, like fuck and its derivatives, has been used mutatis mutandis as noun, pronoun, adjective, participle and other parts of speech.
 
#12
Cunt (/ˈkʌnt/) is a vulgarism, primarily referring to the female genitalia, specifically the vulva, and including the cleft of Venus. The earliest citation of this usage in the 1972 Oxford English Dictionary, c 1230, refers to the London street known as Gropecunt Lane. Scholar Germaine Greer has said that "it is one of the few remaining words in the English language with a genuine power to shock."[

Cunt is also used informally as a derogatory epithet in referring to a person of either sex, but this usage is relatively recent, dating back only as far as the late nineteenth century. Reflecting different national usages, the Compact Oxford English Dictionary defines cunt as "an unpleasant or stupid person", whereas Merriam-Webster has a usage of the term as "usually disparaging & obscene: woman", noting that it is used in the US as "an offensive way to refer to a woman"; the Macquarie Dictionary of Australian English defines it as "a despicable man", however when used with a positive qualifier (good, funny, clever, etc.) in countries such as Britain, New Zealand and Australia, it conveys a positive sense of the object or person referred to.

The word appears to have been in common usage from the Middle Ages until the eighteenth century. After a period of disuse, usage became more frequent in the twentieth century, in parallel with the rise of popular literature and pervasive media. The term also has various other derived uses and, like fuck and its derivatives, has been used mutatis mutandis as noun, pronoun, adjective, participle and other parts of speech.
WOW I'm amazed
 
#13
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#16
Boredom is an emotional state experienced when an individual is without any work or is not interested in their surroundings. The first recorded use of the word boredom is in the novel Bleak House by Charles Dickens, written in 1852, in which it appears six times, although the expression to be a bore had been used in the sense of "to be tiresome or dull" since 1768. The French term for boredom, ennui, is sometimes used in English as well.
 
#17
I meant 39 Inf Brigade (obviously). Easy mistakea to makea; was original going to name the Regt but decided against it. Chimp.
Will the point to your story be coming along any time soon?

x
 

Latest Threads

Top