The Holiday is over

There are of course demographics in the UK that act in a similar manner, mixing only with their own, not adapting local social mores and norms, refusing to eat any of the local muck but instead only their cuisine.

And look down on the UK population as being lower than dogs - and have moved to the UK as their own country is a backwards s***hole.

Funnily enough the typical Guardian reader would not sneer at such behaviours from that sub-culture in the UK as they would at the behaviour of Brits in Spain.
Yes. So the Daily Mail reader wouldn't see the irony. I actually inherited a property in Tenerife which I still own. I bled myself dry to keep the paperwork in order. The mentality seems to be 'If it's hot there, It'll be fine.'

I have the same with people seeking the idyllic life on the canal. Buy an expensive boat. It's still made of steel, and steel rusts.
 
She essentially wants me to help her with the paperwork in selling it, so she can pocket the money. She says she’ll give me half, but she’s lied about everything for the past two years.
She’s mad, completely effing mad and has completely destroyed half a dozen lives, including that of our kids.

I think you need to speak to a brief mate and get him to evidence this, then get him to write to the estate agent (Leggets perchance?) telling her that she should inform the Notaire of these facts should any sale proceed.
Depends how much dosh they are worth and the hassle factor.

French mayors don't have the power to seize your house, they have lots and lots of powers but not that one.
They can put an order on the owners of a building which is in a dangerous condition in a public place, ordering it to be made safe.
If that is ignored they will get people in, do the work and send you the bill for it, whilst putting a charge on the building to get their money back.
Only seen it done once many miles away.
 
Anyone know what the score is with British owned, but unoccupied, houses in France? I imagine the rules will be the same as in Spain, or the rest of the EU come to that.

My ( I paid for them both) houses in France are (stupidly) in my wife’s name, but she abandoned France two years ago, abandoning me in a French hospital 45 minutes from death (bless her faux Christian nature).

Even more stupidly, everything I own is in those two houses, and I’ve been unable to rescue anything, firstly because I was in hospital in the UK on and off for the first year, and secondly for the past year Covid has made any travel there impossible.

My plan has always been to race over there with a BFO lorry as soon as Covid lifts, but seeing this thread has made me wonder if the frog authorities can seize the properties if they are laying dormant and unoccupied.
I remember your relating the background some time ago and it is a similar(ish) total bind that we are in, albeit inthe UK.
Seriously hope that you can sort the total mess that you have been dumped in and possibly even use legal machinations to reclaim title, not only for your possessions but also for the properties. Worth looking into? Much empathy and best of luck.
 
Nearly 5 years. And they made it incredibly easy as well. You didn't even have to have legal residency before Jan 1st this year, just show that you had been living there by utility bills, being on the council list, bank records and other things then they'd allow you to stay legally.

From July last year, they even set up a special department in each province for handling application from Brits and even put people in there who speak English.

You have to prove a certain income. This is based on the IPREM (The Public effects income indicator) which is around 6,000 euro a year and, if you lived in Spain before Jan 1st, you just had to show that amount so pensioners would be well covered. You also had until 31st March to apply for residency.

Now, the grace period is over and you have to show 4xIPREM as a non EU citizen to get residency (works out around 27,000 euro a year) plus private or state health insurance.

Bureaucracy in Spain is incredibly slow and complicate but they made getting residency for Brits extremely easy. The easiest things I've ever done was getting residency (albeit 10 years ago now) and health cover for free.

Those who haven't done it are the ones that nip back to UK for doctors prescriptions or get dodgy MoT certificates to keep their Brit reg car here and not pay the extortionate (for my 1.6 SUV it's €34.60 a year) road tax.

ETA
Oh, and every Brit newspaper was full of advice from the Brit consulate and the Spanish government on what they needed to do to make themselves legal. We even got a letter direct from the British embassy in Spain informing us of the procedures necessary under the withdrawal agreement and these pieces of advice have been published on a regular basis for well over a year.
Then my heart bleeds purple piss.
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer

She added that the departure of people who had “lived under the radar for 20/30/40 years” and who “contributed nothing” in the way of taxes or social contributions would not be missed.

^Chair of a group that represents UK migrants to Spain broadly agreeing with the thread consensus.
 

Awol

LE
I think you need to speak to a brief mate and get him to evidence this, then get him to write to the estate agent (Leggets perchance?) telling her that she should inform the Notaire of these facts should any sale proceed.
Depends how much dosh they are worth and the hassle factor.

French mayors don't have the power to seize your house, they have lots and lots of powers but not that one.
They can put an order on the owners of a building which is in a dangerous condition in a public place, ordering it to be made safe.
If that is ignored they will get people in, do the work and send you the bill for it, whilst putting a charge on the building to get their money back.
Only seen it done once many miles away.
Thanks Buddy. I did find a legalese website which pointed out that there is a particular ‘protocol that comes into play when a property is disputed by a non-French couple, even if one of them is the sole legal owner. Had it happens we are both English (but married in the Cloth Hall in Ypres, don’tcha know, Mrs @Old Stab was spitting kittens when I told her that :) )


I need to track down where the ex wife lives first those before I can send qany terrifying letters. Once I’ve found that, all gloves are off, shes not on the electoral register, and unlikely to be on the census

Any suggestions short of hiring Philip Marlowe would be welcomed.
 
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Kirkz

LE
Thanks Buddy. I did find a legalese website which pointed out that there is a particular ‘protocol that comes into play when a property is disputed by a non-French couple, even if one of them is the sole legal owner. Had it happens we are both English (but married in the Cloth Hall in Ypres, don’tcha know, Mrs @Old Stab was spitting kittens when I told her that :) )


I need to track down where the ex wife lives first those before I can send qany terrifying letters. Once I’ve found that, all gloves are off, shes not on the electoral register, and unlikely to be on the census

Any suggestions short of hiring Philip Marlowe would be welcomed.
The obvious starting point would be to search for her on social media.
 
Thanks Buddy. I did find a legalese website which pointed out that there is a particular ‘protocol that comes into play when a property is disputed by a non-French couple, even if one of them is the sole legal owner. Had it happens we are both English (but married in the Cloth Hall in Ypres, don’tcha know, Mrs @Old Stab was spitting kittens when I told her that :) )


I need to track down where the ex wife lives first those before I can send qany terrifying letters. Once I’ve found that, all gloves are off, shes not on the electoral register, and unlikely to be on the census

Any suggestions short of hiring Philip Marlowe would be welcomed.

Why was everything in your (ex)wifes name?
 

Awol

LE
Why was everything in your (ex)wifes name?
When we first met, thirty years ago, we had a house each. To consolidate things I sold mine and put the money into hers which was more suited for a growing family. Each subsequent house remained on the same mortgage (ie hers), with never a hint that things might go pear shaped after 30 years of married bliss.

Hindsight is a b’stard.
 

Dread

LE
Thanks Buddy. I did find a legalese website which pointed out that there is a particular ‘protocol that comes into play when a property is disputed by a non-French couple, even if one of them is the sole legal owner. Had it happens we are both English (but married in the Cloth Hall in Ypres, don’tcha know, Mrs @Old Stab was spitting kittens when I told her that :) )


I need to track down where the ex wife lives first those before I can send qany terrifying letters. Once I’ve found that, all gloves are off, shes not on the electoral register, and unlikely to be on the census

Any suggestions short of hiring Philip Marlowe would be welcomed.

Lawyer up.

Hungary uses the Napoleonic Code system of law, and while there are many differences, there are also many similarities with its French originator.

In the UK it is typical for the wife to get the house and be looked at kindly by the Courts. Not so much in Europe. Here in Hungary the courts take the view: whatever was yours before you were married is yours, whatever was hers before the marriage is hers and everything else is split 50:50.
 

Awol

LE
I moved to France in 2013 and took the European Health card to guarantee decent medical treatment if needed, plus one for each of my family.

In December 2018 I became seriously ill with internal bleeding days before the regular family flight back to the UK for Christmas. Our lovely French neighbour Eloise, drove us to the Airport except that I was drifting in and out of consciousness just getting to the car and had to be carried. Once in the front passenger seat, it was reclined fully and all I can remember of the journey in staring at the roof of the car. All this time, despite the fact that I was clearly dying, my wife kept insisting “airport, airport, airport”.

Eventually, thank god, somewhere near Limoges, Eloise said to herself (in French no doubt) “Bollox to this, this bloke is dying” and took me direct to the main hospital. I remember being stretchered in and, under very bright lights, being given two and a half litres of 0+ and half a litre of plasma. That’s more than three quarters of my normal blood level. A doctor later said that I was 45 minutes from death upon arrival. At some point in the next hour my wife and my beloved 14 year old son arrived and she said, “Bye, we’re off to catch the plane” and they left.

The surgery the next day (cauterising extensive bleeding in my stomach) failed, but a subsequent operation using staples succeeded (it may have been the other way around, I’m not clear).

Three days later, on Christmas Day, I felt okay and insisted on discharging myself, and subsequently came across an example of human kindness it would difficult to beat.




I’m knackered right now and maybe will continue this tomorrow if anyone is interested, but for the moment, and for the record, @ExREME.TECH, if you think, as is the clear inference in your snide posts, that I was some sort of health tourist, you can shove you’re dirty little mind clear up your filthy, rotten ringpeice.
To continue.....

I entered hospital on 22nd Dec. 2018 and let the very nice French medics slice and dice for the next couple of days.

Eventually on Christmas Day itself I escaped into the very, very quiet centre of Limoges, it being Xmas day etc.

Thanks to millions of pounds having been spent on the finest military training the world has to offer, I had learnt that the sun set in the west and as I was heading home (30km to the north) I knew that I had to keep the sun on my left. I started walking, and as .

To continue.....

I entered hospital on 22nd Dec. 2018 and let the very nice French medics slice and dice for the next couple of days.

Eventually on Christmas Day itself I escaped into the very, very quiet centre of Limoges, it being Xmas day etc.

Thanks to millions of pounds having been spent on the finest military training the world has to offer, I had learnt that the sun set in the west and as I was heading home (30km to the north) I knew that I had to keep the sun on my left. I started walking, and as I did I discovered that the bus stops mostly had maps stuck behind Perspex.

This gave me a general sense of direction, but it wasn’t really accurate enough.

Anyway, about midday, I was struggling through the suburbs when I came across a couple of blokes who were repaving a driveway (Christmas day remember). I knew from the bus stop maps which road I needed but I didn’t have an accurate map, so I asked in my bestest French “Pardon mes Amis, est-ce-vous avez une carte de la route pres d’Ici?”

Or something.

I explained that I had just left hospital and needed to get home.

They then spoke to each other in a flurry of Frenchness, and one of of them said he would take me home in their Peugeot/Citroen/Transit thing.

I was delighted and said that I would more than happily pay him €40 for his trouble, especially bearing in mind that there were bugger all taxis available on Christmas Day.

So we drove north, to what I knew would be a cold, empty and familyless house. On the way we made (very) small talk, but the bloke knew all the short cuts etc and he explained that he had lived there all his life and even occasionally pretended to understand me.

When we got to the house, I explained that the €40 was in the house, and just to reassure him that I wasn’t trying to pull a fast one, I offered him my (God’s own) British passport as security.

But no matter what I said, he just wouldn’t have it, and just kept telling me that it was Christmas, I had just been released from hospital and he was only too pleased to help me.

To my eternal shame, I didn’t photograph the van or even get his surname, but the guy
deserves my thanks for evermore.


More to possibly follow, with midnight cramps, vomiting 11 times before I reached the UK, having Bath RUH, tying me down while they assaulted me 15 times while they shoved 8mm pipes up my nose and down my throat.

Question....why are the doctors (err.... female , bloody obviously) who are so damnedly beautiful, that they are the ones who are so cruel?
 
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Anyone know what the score is with British owned, but unoccupied, houses in France? I imagine the rules will be the same as in Spain, or the rest of the EU come to that.

My ( I paid for them both) houses in France are (stupidly) in my wife’s name, but she abandoned France two years ago, abandoning me in a French hospital 45 minutes from death (bless her faux Christian nature).

Even more stupidly, everything I own is in those two houses, and I’ve been unable to rescue anything, firstly because I was in hospital in the UK on and off for the first year, and secondly for the past year Covid has made any travel there impossible.

My plan has always been to race over there with a BFO lorry as soon as Covid lifts, but seeing this thread has made me wonder if the frog authorities can seize the properties if they are laying dormant and unoccupied.
If they are going to seize yours, then they will seize ours as well! My wife is French and we have a house in the Charente, and, no, I've heard nothing at all about the French seizing non-residents property. Given the number of Brits owning homes over there (and the number of French with holiday homes), if they tried that one, there would be riots in the street (again). Put it this way - I'd burn the place down before I let the French authorities seize it.
 

Awol

LE
If they are going to seize yours, then they will seize ours as well! My wife is French and we have a house in the Charente, and, no, I've heard nothing at all about the French seizing non-residents property. Given the number of Brits owning homes over there (and the number of French with holiday homes), if they tried that one, there would be riots in the street (again). Put it this way - I'd burn the place down before I let the French authorities seize it.
Mine are in the Charente too. What’s your nearest town?

Perhaps we can have a house warming (burning) party.
 
Anyone know what the score is with British owned, but unoccupied, houses in France? I imagine the rules will be the same as in Spain, or the rest of the EU come to that.

My ( I paid for them both) houses in France are (stupidly) in my wife’s name, but she abandoned France two years ago, abandoning me in a French hospital 45 minutes from death (bless her faux Christian nature).

Even more stupidly, everything I own is in those two houses, and I’ve been unable to rescue anything, firstly because I was in hospital in the UK on and off for the first year, and secondly for the past year Covid has made any travel there impossible.

My plan has always been to race over there with a BFO lorry as soon as Covid lifts, but seeing this thread has made me wonder if the frog authorities can seize the properties if they are laying dormant and unoccupied.
This link might help Divorce and distribution of property in France
 

Ayatollah

Old-Salt
My heart goes out to all affected, but if those who are affected sat back thinking I'm a Brit with a nothing can touch me attitude, then you created a self-inflicted problem. Americans and Canadians have suffered these problems in Mexico for years and property has been seized, although mainly because they didn't rightfully own the land the property was built on and refused to pay again?

To AWOL, although it will be expensive you need to talk to an international property lawyer, the fact you were in hospital and with covid restricting movements you should be able to either take residency or get an extension to apply. And as you have proof of your hospital stay etc it may be worth the expense there again perhaps you could get the lawyer to sell for you?

Good Luck
 

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