The heroic story of how a British soldier single-handedly saved 10 men from a collaps

#3
Seems odd she's saying she doesn't have any kids to pass it on to and yet is selling the stuff to fund her wedding !! Isn't that the correct order to do things in ?

Mind, if she's incapable of saving an extra three grand that the memorabilia is expected to fetch. she's not a chip off the old block is she ?

I hope she ends up divorced. Then she can rue what the extra money got her, be it a honeymoon overseas rather than in the UK or whatever.

Perhaps she was estranged as she lives with her mum - the EX-Mrs Hero ............

D_B
 
#4
Any of you old breathless ones, remember this happening in Celle 1965, It happened in Vorwerk near the WAZA Biscuit factory.?


Hero soldier Sergeant Patrick Hanlon saved 10 German workers in daring rescue - now daughter is selling the memorabilia | Mail Online
I didn't know of the incident but thanks for bringing up, these gallant actions deserved to be remembered.

As does a little known and almost forgotten award of the George Medal to an American airman in East Anglia, Reice Leming, for saving a number of civilians during the 1953 floods. I chanced upon the story just recently. Wonder what became of him and his well deserved medal? I know he took some time to recover from the exertions of his actions.

As for Sgt Hanlon's daughter selling the medal- it's hers to do as she likes and at least it's brought her father's heroism to a wider audience.
 
#5
In the long run 3k is feck all but that medal should be passed down the line. Simple greed. It will also go for more than 3k I believe.

The only positive thing however is that collectors will keep the story alive and look after the award and the mans memory and deed.
 
#6
As for Sgt Hanlon's daughter selling the medal- it's hers to do as she likes and at least it's brought her father's heroism to a wider audience.
Whilst I agree completely with that, if I were her son in 20 or more years time, I'd be pissed off at her if I found out she'd sold it to go to DisneyWorld. Of course that's just me and her son may not give a shit about ancient history concerning someone he never knew.

I might understand it if it were for £30k + but a measley £3k ............ that's not a high price for your family history is it ?

Be nice if his Regt got it.

D_B
 
#8
Although she can do what she wants with it, trying to pass it off as her old mans contribution to her wedding is taking the piss a bit.

As one of the comments on the link said, a George medal for some fizzy pop and a piece of cake, not much of a trade.
 
#9
i just hope she does not read the comments of the daily hates readers at the bottom.
I can only think of two reasons why these "I have to sell my/my xxxxx's medal(s) stories" crop up in the papers, usually the DM, from time-to-time.

1. To publicise the sale in order that it might bring in a higher price.

2. In the hope that a knight in shining armour is moved sufficiently to cough up
the required sum so that the seller gets the cash and gets to keep the medal(s) as well.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#10
As does a little known and almost forgotten award of the George Medal to an American airman in East Anglia, Reice Leming, for saving a number of civilians during the 1953 floods. I chanced upon the story just recently. Wonder what became of him and his well deserved medal? I know he took some time to recover from the exertions of his actions.
Still alive I believe:

BBC NEWS | England | 1953 floods hero returns to remember


1953 floods hero returns to remember

Reis Leming sometimes thinks his rescues were a mirage


Dick Meadows

BBC features producer
A man who rescued people from the devastating 1953 east coast floods returns to Hunstanton for the first time in 50 years


"For 50 years I have woken up some nights and wondered 'Was it all a mirage? Did I really save all those people? Did they really survive?'"
The words of American Reis Leming on his emotional return to Hunstanton in Norfolk.
Half a century earlier he rescued 27 people from the east coast floods - a feat which earned him the George Medal, the first American in peacetime to receive it.
The floods on the night of 31 January 1953 were the worst peacetime disaster in Britain during the 20th Century.
Reis Leming as a 22-year-old serviceman


More than 300 people died - and hundreds more were saved because of the bravery of people like Mr Leming.
What had begun as an unremarkable weather front far out in the Atlantic had turned into what meteorologists sometimes call "the perfect storm".
As the piled-up waters from the Atlantic reached the North Sea, rising winds of well over 100mph - and coming disastrously from the North - began to drive a wall of water down the North Sea.
Worse still, it coincided with high tide. In its path were dozens of unsuspecting coastal communities living in wooden prefabricated homes, surviving symbols of post-war austerity.
Mr Leming was a 22-year-old airman stationed at the United States air base at Sculthorpe.

"It was cold, bitterly cold. And there came a time when I realised that I, too, was probably, not going to survive "

Reis Leming


When the floods struck nearby Hunstanton, many of those trapped were American service families living off-base in South Beach Road.

Thirty-one people would not survive - 16 of them Americans.
Dragging a small rubber raft, the young American airman plunged through the roaring winds and waves.
It was pitch black and he was totally alone.
Around him were the screams of the trapped and dying.
Standing in South Beach Road 50 years on, Mr Leming recalls his fear and apprehension as he struggled to save those clinging to their roofs.
Others had already been swept out to sea.
"Scared ? I was frightened to death.

'Out of control'
"It was cold, bitterly cold. And there came a time when I realised that I, too, was probably, not going to survive.
"Everything was out of control. And I wondered at times, 'What the hell am I doing here?' "
Totally exhausted after hours in the raging torrents and with his survival suit torn and filled with water, Mr Leming eventually collapsed suffering from severe hypothermia.
For years he was haunted by the first remark he heard when he awoke -"cut off his legs!"
It was only recently that he discovered these were the words of a nurse trying desperately to cut off the legs of his survival suit so he could be massaged back to life.

Queen's visit
The day after the floods wreaked such terrible havoc along the East Anglian coast, the Queen, who was at Sandringham, visited Hunstanton.
Only nine days later the young American was awarded the George Medal, one of the quickest-ever recipients of the award.
He was one of five people to win the George Medal for their gallantry that wild night. The others were two policemen in Lincolnshire, a Great Yarmouth fireman and another American.




See also:


23 Jan 03 | England Horror of the floods undimmed
Who was the other Yank? I can't seem to find his name (only been looking five mins though).
 
#11
Still alive I believe:


Who was the other Yank? I can't seem to find his name (only been looking five mins though).

Wow!
Many thanks for that.
The BBC's first name differs from the name Reice that appeared in the contemporary article that I saw. I believe that his was the only US award promulgated at that time so the other American may have been awarded later (for the same date)
Amazing story, I hope it was made known in the States
 
#12
I didn't know of the incident but thanks for bringing up, these gallant actions deserved to be remembered.

As does a little known and almost forgotten award of the George Medal to an American airman in East Anglia, Reice Leming, for saving a number of civilians during the 1953 floods. I chanced upon the story just recently. Wonder what became of him and his well deserved medal? I know he took some time to recover from the exertions of his actions.

As for Sgt Hanlon's daughter selling the medal- it's hers to do as she likes and at least it's brought her father's heroism to a wider audience.
Reis Leming is living in Central Oregon and the George Medal is in a frame on the hallway wall along with pictures of his family. We are continually
amazed at the memory of the English people and have been welcomed in Hunstanton and the surrounding area several times. We love it there, we
love the people there and feel at home there. Reis has recently been contacted by a representative of the 67th Air Rescue Squadron (now called the
67th Special Operations Squadron at RAF Mildenhall) regarding the 60th anniversary of the 67th and we hope to be able to attend any ceremonies
for that event in 2012. The Leming family is very proud of Reis and thanks to his former wife, Mary Ann Ramsay Nokes who recently passed away,
we have lots of memorabilia from the flood and more. As of 2011 Reis has 3 children, 6 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren and has been
married to Kathy since 1973.
 
#13
Reis Leming is living in Central Oregon and the George Medal is in a frame on the hallway wall along with pictures of his family. We are continually
amazed at the memory of the English people and have been welcomed in Hunstanton and the surrounding area several times. We love it there, we
love the people there and feel at home there. Reis has recently been contacted by a representative of the 67th Air Rescue Squadron (now called the
67th Special Operations Squadron at RAF Mildenhall) regarding the 60th anniversary of the 67th and we hope to be able to attend any ceremonies
for that event in 2012. The Leming family is very proud of Reis and thanks to his former wife, Mary Ann Ramsay Nokes who recently passed away,
we have lots of memorabilia from the flood and more. As of 2011 Reis has 3 children, 6 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren and has been
married to Kathy since 1973.
Hello Kathy,

I was delighted to read your post. Many thanks for taking the trouble to bring us up-to-date on what is really a heart-warming story and I can well understand the family pride in Reis. I am also pleased to hear of your reception in Norfolk.
60 years is a significant anniversary and I shall keep a local media lookout for it.
Best wishes to you both.
T-50
 
#16
How sad, but he leaves this earth much loved and not forgotten. RIP Reis.
 
#17
Here's saluting a hero!

Unlike the other piece of excrement who, when stationed at Hohne not long before I got there, shot and killed a taxi driver and later on became a crap actor and became a "star" of Eastenders.
 

cent05zr70

On ROPS
On ROPs
#19
Here's saluting a hero!

Unlike the other piece of excrement who, when stationed at Hohne not long before I got there, shot and killed a taxi driver and later on became a crap actor and became a "star" of Eastenders.
Seconded. The whole garrison was CB for a couple of days. Couldn't even get to the Snakepit.
 

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