The Glorious 1st of June (1794)

#1
Warm and heartfelt greetings today, the 213th anniversary of the Battle of the Glorious 1st June, to all members of the Regimental Family of the 2nd Foot (The Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey)) and their successors.

VEL EXUVIAE TRIUMPHANT
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#4
Yes, hearty cheers all round, and especially to those now serving in the PWRR, as well as all former PWRR and Queens Regiment.

Don't forget - never stand for the Loyal Toast - in commemoration of this Victory :)
 
#6
Yes I pushed this one around the office with ribald responses as to why Lord Howe was known as 'Black Dick'.

It was of course because of his swarthy good looks.

He is commemorated in the name Howe Barracks at Canterbury - home of the PWRR.

1st Bn The Queen's Regiment used to celebrate this day by playing HMS Excellent at Whale Island (inheritors of the traditions of the Queen Charlotte) at cricket for the toillette trophee (an old toilet seat suitably mounted and inscribed). Great fun - alas a tradition that has not been kept up.
 
#7
This WFR bloke started the day with a glass of port and 'Hearts of Oak' playing loud enough to annoy the neibours (foreigners you know!)
 
#9
Because the Army did much of the fighting (not all of it I accept)
 
#12
OldSnowy said:
Don't forget - never stand for the Loyal Toast - in commemoration of this Victory :)
To this day, I never do! Given, I will stand up when everyone else does, but only when comfortably seated again will I raise my bumper and toast 'The Queen'! Usually gets 'em going!!!

Small point to note Snowy, the Queen's custom of drinking the Loyal Toast seated actually comes down from the East Surrey Regiment. They saw service as Marines between 1702 and 1715! They were raised as Villiers Marines in 1702, changed it's name to Luttrell's Marines in 1704, the same year they won their first battle honour - namely 'Gibraltar'. In 1715 the then named Goring's Regiment (since 1711) were redesignated as Infantry of the Line, eventually becoming the 31st of Foot.

With this tradition came the playing of 'A Life on the Ocean Wave' on ceremonial occasions as well as the wearing of the smart Blue Lanyard of the Royal Marines (Admiralty Fleet Order 333 of 1948). We wore these in the old 1st Battalion - do the PWRR?
 
#13
Queensman said:
OldSnowy said:
Don't forget - never stand for the Loyal Toast - in commemoration of this Victory :)
To this day, I never do! Given, I will stand up when everyone else does, but only when comfortably seated again will I raise my bumper and toast 'The Queen'! Usually gets 'em going!!!

Small point to note Snowy, the Queen's custom of drinking the Loyal Toast seated actually comes down from the East Surrey Regiment. They saw service as Marines between 1702 and 1715! They were raised as Villiers Marines in 1702, changed it's name to Luttrell's Marines in 1704, the same year they won their first battle honour - namely 'Gibraltar'. In 1715 the then named Goring's Regiment (since 1711) were redesignated as Infantry of the Line, eventually becoming the 31st of Foot.

With this tradition came the playing of 'A Life on the Ocean Wave' on ceremonial occasions as well as the wearing of the smart Blue Lanyard of the Royal Marines (Admiralty Fleet Order 333 of 1948). We wore these in the old 1st Battalion - do the PWRR?
2 PWRR started wearing a lanyard around 1998-99.
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#14
I still have my Blue Lanyard somewhere in the attic, along with the late unlamented blue cravat as well worn with Barrack Dress Trs, JHW, and No 2 Shirt).

So 1 Queens wore a blue lanyard - did the other two Bns wear anything similar? Orange one, for example?
 
#16
OldSnowy said:
I still have my Blue Lanyard somewhere in the attic, along with the late unlamented blue cravat as well worn with Barrack Dress Trs, JHW, and No 2 Shirt).

So 1 Queens wore a blue lanyard - did the other two Bns wear anything similar? Orange one, for example?
Crikey! You really ARE 'Old', Snowy!! Blue Cravat...... that's a bit of ancient history. We used to laugh at photos of people wearing them in the Mess scrap book!!!

The 2nd Bn wore some strange dangly thing whose history I know not, as the post above reports the 3rd sported an Orange one, a Royal Sussex affectation, they being big on Protestant Orange things. (Good on 'em). The 5th, 6/7th and 8th Bns all, I think donned a selection of them.

Talking of ancient history - a year ago or so, I took the Godforbids to Dover Castle and thence around the Les Wilson memorial museum! How old is one made to feel when one finds pictures of oneself in a Museum!?!?! Cries of 'Oh Look Mummy, there's a picture of Daddy up there!!' Oh yes! Look..... :-(
 
#17
[/i]quote]With this tradition came the playing of 'A Life on the Ocean Wave' on ceremonial occasions as well as the wearing of the smart Blue Lanyard of the Royal Marines (Admiralty Fleet Order 333 of 1948). We wore these in the old 1st Battalion - do the PWRR?[/quote]

Yes - all ranks wear a Navy blue lanyard but I don't think it is the Royal Marine pattern. In 1 QUEEN'S this lanyard was worn by Officers and Grade One Private Soldiers and above on the left shoulder. In 6/7 QUEEN'S by Officers and Warrant Officers only.

2 QUEEN'S Officers and SNCO's wore a Royal Blue lanyard. 3 QUEEN'S obviously wore a Royal Dutch Orange lanyard initially worn by Officers and Warrant Officers later extended as in 1 QUEEN'S. 5 QUEEN'S Officers + SNCO's wore a sea green lanyard.
 
#18
So on the tradition front - what was the background to Queens officers wearing a tuft of bum-fluff on the cheeks?
As a very young subbie I could never work out if I was jealous or not.
Cheers
Scratch
 

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