The Gay Cake and the Quango

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-29926372

A watchdog has confirmed it is taking legal action against a Christian-run bakery firm over its refusal to bake a cake with a pro-gay marriage slogan.

The Equality Commission wrote to Ashers Baking Company earlier this year, after it declined a customer's order.

The commission supported the customer's claim for compensation, but lawyers for the County Antrim firm do not accept the bakery owners acted unlawfully.

Paul Staines aka Guido Fawkes puts a good spin on it..

http://order-order.com/2014/11/06/gaycakegate-breaks-promise-to-defend-religious-freedoms/
Another day, another bonkers politically correct ruling from a taxpayer-funded quango. The Equality Commission, which is a public body paid for out of the public purse, is using its state-sponsored power to takelegal actionagainst a small, independent patisserie in Belfast because its Christian owners didn’t want to bake a cake. ‘Queerspace’ gay rights activist Gareth Lee asked the shop to make him the above cake, but was politely told by its religious owners the message was contrary to their beliefs.Rather than simply go to a different shop he called the equality police, who are now taking the Christian bakers to court.

What this comes down to is the state using taxpayers’ money to force a free citizen into forced labour against their will: that is a form of slavery. The shop owners did no harm to the gay rights activist – who could easily have taken his custom elsewhere – they merely expressed their right not to produce a message contrary to their religious beliefs. Gordon Ramsay kicked a customer out of his restaurant for asking for ketchup, will the Equality Commission be taking him to court for infringing the human rights of ketchup lovers?When the government passed gay marriage they vowed religious beliefs would be respected, instead the state is persecuting anyone who does not conform to their ‘progressive’ views…

What happened to the bonfire of the Quango's and surely the Baker has the automatic right to turn down work if he so wishes.

Did the House of Commons mean for State prosecutions like this to take place when they enacted the equality legislation?
 
What the bakery did was right, only they went about it in the wrong way. They should have declined his business on the basis that they were simply too busy, or taken the order and then subsequently cancelled it, rather than go down the 'belief' route. Have to play these types at their own game.
 
Political Correctness and Multiculturalism are the twin cancers that ripple though society, most loved and ordained and supported by our "progressively" Liberalised Lefty 'Luvviedom' - and other addled pated morons on the political left.
 

NSP

LE
Being a natural-born cynic, part of me* suspects that the punter went in with prior and malicious hope that he would be told his order couldn't be taken for contentious reasons, simply to get his organisation all over the headlines, along with a nice compo cheque for the cause.


* All of me, in point of fact.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Being a natural-born cynic, part of me* suspects that the punter went in with prior and malicious hope that he would be told his order couldn't be taken for contentious reasons, simply to get his organisation all over the headlines, along with a nice compo cheque for the cause.


* All of me, in point of fact.

that outrageous suggestion has been made elsewhere, by a rampant gayer. It's almost as if some people are professional homosexuals. it's more important to them that they are gay (and being discriminated against) than anything else.
 
What the bakery did was right, only they went about it in the wrong way. They should have declined his business on the basis that they were simply too busy, or taken the order and then subsequently cancelled it, rather than go down the 'belief' route. Have to play these types at their own game.

Better still, accept the order, but on the basis of being too busy, sub it our to an Islamic baker.

Sit back with popcorn and Kia-Ora and enjoy the fallout.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I wonder if they'll make me some fairy cakes?
 
You wonder if the Gay Police would invade and pursue this place if they did the same thing in rejecting a LGBT themed Cream Puff?

Halal extends to drinks, to vegetable products, and even to baked goods. Manor is a Muslim owned patisserie based in Ruislip so you can be sure that no lard is being used in the delicious cheesecakes or tiramisu.

IMG_0408.jpg



http://www.halalgirlabouttown.com/manor-bakery/
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
"Religious beliefs" are only protected, under law, for religious organisations or actual religions. Not for businesses whose owners, managers or employees happen to have religious views.

And there is some considerable doubt under ECHR case law precedent just how strong the UK legal exemptions for religious organisations would turn out to be. ECHR has stated (Gas and Dubois vs France, 2012) that gay marriage is not a "human right" but the issue is that if gay marriage is permitted, as it is in England and Wales and will shortly be in Scotland, whether churches will be able to refuse to marry people who are legally entitled etc, etc ... Note that the same exemption has applied to divorcees for some time, with little challenge, and to transgender folk with a gender recognition certificate (with, to date, no challenge I am aware of.)
 
Being a natural-born cynic, part of me* suspects that the punter went in with prior and malicious hope that he would be told his order couldn't be taken for contentious reasons, simply to get his organisation all over the headlines, along with a nice compo cheque for the cause.


* All of me, in point of fact.

I share your cynicism.

Personally I disagree with the bakers.

However this story first happened in the US earlier this year (California IIRC). Identical circumstances. Xtian fundies refusing to bake a gay wedding cake.

I think these guys knew that and were deliberately trying to creat a fuss.
 
What the bakery did was right, only they went about it in the wrong way. They should have declined his business on the basis that they were simply too busy, or taken the order and then subsequently cancelled it, rather than go down the 'belief' route. Have to play these types at their own game.

Could have, but why should they need to?
If they objected to the request, IMHO they should be entitled to refuse it.
 

NSP

LE
It's almost as if some people are professional homosexuals.
Indeed - in much the same way as some people are professionally offended on behalf of people who really couldn't care less. Usually these offendees are from an entirely different social/ethnic group, too.
 
Yes, make the cake. Then, when they come to collect it, wish them luck, and mention in passing that you sacked one of the staff for making homophobic remarks, and miming spitting at the cake as it was being mixed.
 
Run a business along business lines and places of religion along religious lines. Don't (as we used to say) bring your politics and religion to work.

I am sure we could all find instructions in any good book that command discrimination against people who aren't this or don't do that etc.

Would you accept a manager of a business for example refusing to have someone on the team because that person refuses to pray five times a day on Friday or the like? I bet if you look in that particular good book you can find some instruction that mandates and justifies such an action.

Would the line "it is against my religious belief to associate with that person" be met all round acceptance and the person affected told to sling their hook?
 
You can guarantee it was done on purpose to get this result, exactly the same as the B+B that got shat on a few years back for refusing to let a gay couple stay.
Seems no-one is allowed to have personal opinions any more.

One of my closest friends used to be a lesbian and we'd go out sometimes to various gay pubs around.
As a straight bloke there were some places that I could only go in by invitation. I didn't kick up a fuss. Their place, their rules.

I wonder what the result would be if I demanded compensation for the hurt feelings caused by their heterophobic attitude....
 

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