The future of boarding ops?

Must admit, I was pretty sceptical of the military application of the jetpack, but having watched this clip of 3 guys shifting between RIBs and P2000 patrol craft, throw an armed drone into the mix, just maybe.

"Over to our armchair defence consultants and Trace off Facebook for an in-depth analysis...."

 

philc

LE
Must admit, I was pretty sceptical of the military application of the jetpack, but having watched this clip of 3 guys shifting between RIBs and P2000 patrol craft, throw an armed drone into the mix, just maybe.

"Over to our armchair defence consultants and Trace off Facebook for an in-depth analysis...."

If it involves more WAFUs, no thanks.

Manned drones impressive fun, but the future not so sure. Just use drones.
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
Must admit, I was pretty sceptical of the military application of the jetpack, but having watched this clip of 3 guys shifting between RIBs and P2000 patrol craft, throw an armed drone into the mix, just maybe.

"Over to our armchair defence consultants and Trace off Facebook for an in-depth analysis...."

I was at that serial. Pretty noisy and not a lot of finesse. I think there might be the odd niche application when the technology is a lot more mature.

For non-compliant boardings I don't much utility as you expose the operator to too much risk and the endurance is too short for effective stand-off.

UxV technology is maturing and when we've invested in the resilient and flexible C2 architecture needed to make that all work we'll be able to do a lot more at reach with less risk to humans but I think we're a long way off from that. Autonomy by default is a great headmark but it will drive in significant costs and I'm not sure we're prepared for that.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Forget jet packs, with the state of our economy, you're going to relearn how to do this:

 
UxV technology is maturing and when we've invested in the resilient and flexible C2 architecture needed to make that all work we'll be able to do a lot more at reach with less risk to humans but I think we're a long way off from that. Autonomy by default is a great headmark but it will drive in significant costs and I'm not sure we're prepared for that.
Yep. It was the same with the Spitfire I imagine. If it was left to the mercy of the tail-end bureaucracy rather than the teeth of imminent necessity, it would probably never have flown.
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
Yep. It was the same with the Spitfire I imagine. If it was left to the mercy of the tail-end bureaucracy rather than the teeth of imminent necessity, it would probably never have flown.
Total war required and enabled innovation at great cost. We're not in that same position and post COVID I worry a lot of current plans let alone future will be unaffordable. Last year global defence spending was $1.9trillion, in 2.5m we spent $11trillion on COVID, the implications are huge.
 
Total war required and enabled innovation at great cost. We're not in that same position and post COVID I worry a lot of current plans let alone future will be unaffordable. Last year global defence spending was $1.9trillion, in 2.5m we spent $11trillion on COVID, the implications are huge.
Agreed. You don't get owt for nowt, it'll soon be payback time. Hopefully it won't completely strangle innovation or smother it in needlessly expensive layer of administrative formality.

The actual materiel cost of the jetpack engines is less than a Bootneck's monthly wage + Admin Bollix = £Billions.

The Harrier, to be fair, seemed a pretty improbable concept initially too.
 
If it involves more WAFUs, no thanks.

Manned drones impressive fun, but the future not so sure. Just use drones.
Oi. thats enough out of You fishead. ;) They will miss the thrill of stepping on the rung of a rotten boarding ladder on some grotty trawler, and the feeling of being on an express elevator, as the RIB falls away below. Then the perfect timing required to get back into it. :)
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I’m assuming those jet pack things make a pretty big bang if you manage to put a bullet in one.

Just saying.
 
Bosun's chair for the 21st century?
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
Agreed. You don't get owt for nowt, it'll soon be payback time. Hopefully it won't completely strangle innovation or smother it in needlessly expensive layer of administrative formality.

The actual materiel cost of the jetpack engines is less than a Bootneck's monthly wage + Admin Bollix = £Billions.

The Harrier, to be fair, seemed a pretty improbable concept initially too.
Making something cheap isn't that difficult, making it resilient, reliable, relevant and supportable with regular training is where the costs come in. Most of the DLODS we work to aren't simply administrative formality, they're there to make sure we get what we need, it works, can be sustained, supported and trained. Go to any of the MoD sponsored innovation units and ask what have they managed to introduce into Service on a large scale that delivers real operational effect? There will be barely any, if even one, credible example as innovation and releasing to service as a capability are fish & fowl. I've spent the past few years in this space and trying to bridge that gap, it's a significant challenge commercially, legally and in sheer practical terms of delivering a sustainable and supportable capability.

Like I say I can't see broad utility in this (unlike the flying monkeys from Flash Gordon) but there may be the odd niche use case.
 
Making something cheap isn't that difficult, making it resilient, reliable, relevant and supportable with regular training is where the costs come in. Most of the DLODS we work to aren't simply administrative formality, they're there to make sure we get what we need, it works, can be sustained, supported and trained. Go to any of the MoD sponsored innovation units and ask what have they managed to introduce into Service on a large scale that delivers real operational effect? There will be barely any, if even one, credible example as innovation and releasing to service as a capability are fish & fowl. I've spent the past few years in this space and trying to bridge that gap, it's a significant challenge commercially, legally and in sheer practical terms of delivering a sustainable and supportable capability.

Like I say I can't see broad utility in this (unlike the flying monkeys from Flash Gordon) but there may be the odd niche use case.
Yep, Mitchell, Wallis & many more innovators will have been familiar similar obstacles along the way, I'm sure.

With regards sustainability, wartime of course, provides the opportunity for one hit wonders such as the bouncing bomb, exploding ant-tank dogs, flamethrowers, kamikazi pilot's parachutes, etc, etc.

If we look at current boarding ops via helicopter rapid-roping or 30 knot RIB versus the simultaneous, independent arrival of half a dozen bootnecks at 80 knots from different angles, different altitudes, there maybe something worth at least trialling.
 
Just out of interest does the Royal Navy (or any other navy) have the right to board a ship in international waters in peacetime?
 
I was at that serial. Pretty noisy and not a lot of finesse. I think there might be the odd niche application when the technology is a lot more mature.

For non-compliant boardings I don't much utility as you expose the operator to too much risk and the endurance is too short for effective stand-off.

UxV technology is maturing and when we've invested in the resilient and flexible C2 architecture needed to make that all work we'll be able to do a lot more at reach with less risk to humans but I think we're a long way off from that. Autonomy by default is a great headmark but it will drive in significant costs and I'm not sure we're prepared for that.
Slow moving targets with no range or endurance. Don't have to fire a shot, just make landing awkward until they run out of fuel and ideas.
 
Slow moving targets with no range or endurance. Don't have to fire a shot, just make landing awkward until they run out of fuel and ideas.
Bit like an infantryman on the ground, maybe a bit faster on the sprint (80 knots) over water or land/minefields & a little more agile in 3 dimensions, but yep, not much use s'pose.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top